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Golden Celebration growing against a wall - advice

Posted by Annalyssa Tuscany, Italy (My Page) on
Thu, Jul 4, 13 at 8:27

I'm new to growing roses and feel like I've just dived into a very deep pool....I've fallen completely in love though and my first purchase, the one that started it all, was a pair of Golden Celebrations which I chose for a couple of spots in front of the house which in retrospect may not have been the best choice, but for now I want to try to see if it works out.

They both seem really happy, have doubled in size in the few months I've had them (around when the photos were taken), and have been flowering continuously.

I'm in Tuscany, outside of Florence and this spot gets morning and early afternoon sun. They are flanked by two old huge Jasmine plants that will eventually get a bit of a trim and trained because right now they are out of control.

My question mainly is about how I should treat the plants. I've read on this forum that GC could/should be treated as a short climber, and since I have them here against a wall/stone railing, maybe that could be a good solution?

Right now the thin canes are reaching out toward the sun and droop with the heavy blooms so that they look down and you hardly get to appreciate them. Should I be tying them to stakes?

Thank you!


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Golden Celebration growing against a wall - advice

Second plant.


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RE: Golden Celebration growing against a wall - advice

Hi Annalyssa, I love your stone balcony ... so romantic. Reminds me of Romeo and Juliet. Last year I was foolish to give my Golden Cel. acid fertilizer high in nitrogen, NPK 10-5-4 ... my soil pH is 7.7, and my tap water pH is 8. It became taller than me, too many leaves, and very little blooms.

Then I saw a picture Golden Celebration in a pot, less than 2 feet, or 60 cm ... was loaded with blooms, at least 40+, that put my GC to shame. So early this spring, I chopped my Golden Cel. below my knees. I gave it balanced fertilizer via horse manure ... it gave twice more blooms than previous years, although the root was chopped off when I dug it up & moved it.

When the bush is too tall, water and nutrients have to work against gravity WAY UP. I learned from Roseseek (Kim Rupert) that plants produce best blooms by being trained horizontally, less work for the plant to pump water & nutrients to the tip.

I got the biggest bloom when my Golden Cel. was in its 1st year, tiny own-root. I'm into quality of the bloom, rather than quantity, so I like my bush smaller .... bigger root than top growth means healthier plants.

Someone from England, Caldonbeck posted a pic. of his/her loaded Golden Celebration as a round & compact bush. I thought it was a floribunda at first. If you have plenty of water & soluble fertilizer, and partial shade from hot sun, Golden Cel. can be a round bush, rather than a climber.

Below is one branch Golden Cel, after I chopped it down to 1/2, and moved it to morning sun only. It lost half of its roots when I dug it up, but now healthy and produces more blooms.


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RE: Golden Celebration growing against a wall - advice

There's English Roses Forum, started by Robert in England that has lots of info. & pics. posted by international folks. My user name there is Straw. See the link below:

The quality of the bloom is better than last year ... as a shorter bush in morning sun only: bigger bloom, picture taken this month:

Here is a link that might be useful: English Roses Forum

This post was edited by Strawberryhill on Thu, Jul 4, 13 at 12:48


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RE: Golden Celebration growing against a wall - advice

Here in Southern California -- which may be closer to your conditions -- Golden Celebration can grow just fine as a quite large arching Shrub.

We have 6 GC's in a row, as an informal hedge, providing privacy for our bedroom window. Now, a passer-by sees roses, rather than our bedroom -- and from the inside, we look out into a back-lit screen of green leaves and yellow blooms.

For reference, these plants are now perhaps 6.5- to 7-ft. tall.

Jeri


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RE: Golden Celebration growing against a wall - advice

Hi Annalyssa: I forget to answer your original question:
"Right now the thin canes are reaching out toward the sun and droop with the heavy blooms so that they look down and you hardly get to appreciate them. Should I be tying them to stakes?"

I would give it soluble fertilizer low in nitrogen, but high in potassium to make the stem stronger. My Golden Cel. has no weak neck since I use low nitrogen, and high potassium & phosphorus.

I have Eglantyne, an Austin that refused to bloom until I gave it high-potassium fertilizer. Caldonbeck in England posted very short Austins with tons of blooms ... I asked for the secret, and Caldonbeck said to use fertilizer meant for tomatoes: low in nitrogen, but high potassium and phosphorus.

See below link for picture of someone growing Golden Celebration in a pot: short, compact, lots of blooms. The other picture I saw in a pot had even more blooms. My tap water is alkaline, so I put acid (vinegar or used lemons) to help with better root growth and more blooming. Putting sulfur in the pot does the same, but risks burning in hot sun.

Here is a link that might be useful: Golden Celebration in a pot


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RE: Golden Celebration growing against a wall - advice

Honest -- I don't mean to be contradictory -- but in a mild Mediterranean climate, keeping Golden Celebration healthy in a pot like that would probably take a great deal of work.

Jeri


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RE: Golden Celebration growing against a wall - advice

Annalyssa

I think your notion of a short climber is spot on. As Jeri noted, GC can grow quite large in warm climates. Maybe train the plants up into the star jasmine and train a cane or two horizontally across the baustrade to increase bloom, as Strawberry suggested, and create a romantic frame for the porch? Your plants are so lovely and healthy! I'm glad you've fallen in love. GC is a favorite Austin of mine.

Carol


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RE: Golden Celebration growing against a wall - advice

The picture of Golden Celebration in a pot is from msjam2 7B DFW ... that's Dallas Forth worth, Texas. Most likely hers is own-root, since Chamblee is in Texas. They get 34 inches or 86 cm. of rain per year, but hot temp. over 100 degrees F or 38 degrees Celsius. It's amazing.

Hi Annalyssa: I'm a bit confused about your pics, are your roses in pots, or are they in the ground, but covered with bricks? What type of root-stock is your Golden Cel. grafted on? That would determine if it can take pruning or not. Golden Cel. grafted on Dr. Huey doesn't like hard-pruning in a dry climate.

My Golden Cel. is own-root, it takes hard-pruning well. It did better 1st year when I pruned it hard. When I dug it up, its roots spread out horizontally, rather than a vertical stick like Dr. Huey-rootstock. As own-root, Golden Cel. has a spreading root system that picks up water very well, much healthier, and can handle hard-pruning.

Khalid in Parkistan posted a pic. of his roses grafted on Rosa centifolia, super-healthy in 120 degrees heat. He also posted Rosa Centifolia as a bush, compact & healthy and lush in high heat ... which makes Dr. Huey quite big and messy. Your rootstock will determine the growth habit of your bush.

My own-root Sonia Rykiel produced the best blooms a pot last summer in full sun, over 100 degrees heat. Own-roots do very well in pots. Now I try to duplicate the "pot-condition" below the ground, fluffy soil and soluble-fertilizer. One advantage of below ground is I don't have to water much.

This post was edited by Strawberryhill on Thu, Jul 4, 13 at 17:34


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RE: Golden Celebration growing against a wall - advice

Strawberry, it looks like the roses are growing in small circular beds with raised perimeters set into the brick. Am I correct Annalyssa?

Also, Annalyssa, the top of the porch is out of the photo range, but if there is any structure up there, you could try encouraging some GC canes to reach that height and stretch across there as well.

Carol


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RE: Golden Celebration growing against a wall - advice

I agree with you, Carol, that training it horizontally would produce the most blooming. I checked the climate of Tuscany: much milder than both Texas and my Chicagoland. Tuscany high temp. is in mid 80's, with 32.6 inches of annual rainfall. My high temp was 104 degrees last year, and Texas was worse.

The rootstock still determines the shape of the bush. Use low nitrogen, and high potassium & phosphorus do firm up the stem. My own-root Golden Cel. has thick strong canes, and blooms don't droop either.


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RE: Golden Celebration growing against a wall - advice

Strawberry, I think you might have missed the follow-up reply to the post you referred to:

"Posted by msjam2 7B DFW (My Page) on Wed, Feb 20, 13 at 22:01
Both roses have since moved to their permanent spot in the ground. They grew too big even though those pots are huge. My potted roses get their roots trimmed and I replace the potting soil at the same every two years."

I will admit to having a pair of Golden Celebrations growing in a place that some day I might (okay most likely will) wonder what on earth I was thinking of. I hope to keep them so one can sit in front of them on a bench and allow them to grow up and out the other way. They already want to peak through the back of the bench, so I figure I am fooling only myself with this vision. But I am going to try it anyway.


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RE: Golden Celebration growing against a wall - advice

First of all, wow! You guys are amazing! This is my first time posting a question (certainly not the last because I don't know what I'm doing and here is a fountain of wisdom I can see!)... THANK YOU! :)

Strawberryhill: Thanks so much for the tip re:non high nitrogen fertilizer. My inlaws are crazy about loading everything with fertilizer which I think is fine for their millions of geraniums but I'm super cautious about this for my roses. We put dry cow manure at the bottom of the hole when we planted them, which they seem to like. We've also got a bunch of chicken fertilizer in pellet form... I'm assuming that's also low nitrogen?
Should I be adding that (or tomato fertilizer) now or wait? The canes are REALLY thin... I'll take a photo tonight and post. Right now they are full, full like 15 blooms at various stages on this still small bush - but thin thin thin canes...

Also, the photo of your Golden Celebration is FANTASTIC - they look mouthwatering. I can't wait until I have so many roses I don't feel my heart break when I cut to bring inside.

Jeri - yours is SO BIG! Maybe one day I will also have enormous rose bushes like you!

Ok, question - so this is the case, right? I pretty much need to decide whether to keep it short in order to produce a rounded bush with better blooms OR to train it as a short climber right? Treating it as a climber would mean - correct me if I'm wrong - bending the long canes horizontally and fixing them to a support on the wall and the stone railing... and then just deadheading? What is the correct way to deadhead a climber?

Location: So the plants are in beds that were created when they made the terracotta walkway around the house (basically they left holes and didn't fill with cement). The Jasmine is also growing in the same and they are HUGE so I figured the GCs would also stand a chance. The only thing is it was tough working the soil down there because the beds are a bit too narrow for the major garden tools, so the earth at the bottom (3 feet?) is quite compact...:(

Rootstock: I have NO idea.... How do you know if it's own root or grafted?
(I know, I'm SO clueless right? But I guess we all start somewhere....)

I've posted another photo with the locations indicated - this was at the beginning of the work to the garden, so sorry for the awful photo!

Thanks so much everyone!

Also, thanks for letting me know about the English Rose Forum... :)


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RE: Golden Celebration growing against a wall - advice

  • Posted by dutch88 Adelaide, Australia (My Page) on
    Fri, Jul 5, 13 at 5:33

I prune my GC quite hard in winter, at least by half. I have lots of buds and flowers all through spring and summer. I love cutting them for inside as the fragrance is gorgeous.


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RE: Golden Celebration growing against a wall - advice

dutch88: Oh my word!!!! Those are GLORIOUS! And what is the apricot rose behind it?
Fantastic!!!
Is that only 1 Golden Celebration there?
How do you deadhead your roses? How far down do you cut them? Or do you leave them?
So many questions....


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RE: Golden Celebration growing against a wall - advice

I checked various types of rootstock: Manetti, a pink Nosette, was not successful in clay, so it's replaced by Dr. Huey. Some rootstocks used in England are: Rosa laxa, Rosa Canina, and Rosa multiflora (for acidic soil).

Dr. Huey is also used in Australia. Pruning hard is great, if you have rainfall to promote new growth. Pruning hard doesn't work for region with hot & dry climate, but I checked: Tuscany has 32.6" of rainfall and mild temp ...sounds good to me.

My rainfall is 40" a year, plus 32" of snow ... so I prune HARD before our spring flash flood. In our summer heat of 100 degrees, or 38 degree Celsius, I don't prune.

Chicken manure at NPK of 1.1 / 0.8 / 0.5 is high in nitrogen, not a good idea. Cow manure NPK is 0.2 / 0.1 / 0.2 Perfect balance!

My limestone clay releases calcium when we get rain, pH of rain is 5.6. Calcium firms up the stems and petals of my roses. It's BOTH calcium and potassium that strengthen cell membrane of plants.

If you have limestone clay like mine, no need for gypsum. Otherwise, gypsum (calcium sulfate) helps. Potassium is sold as muriah of potash, potassium sulfate, or sulfate of potash. I tested sulfate of potash ... browned the petals of my light-colored roses. Muriah of potash was OK. Anything with "sulfate" risks browning of petals and leaves.... I tested "iron sulfate" and it browned the petals & leaves of my azaleas & rhododendrons.

Potassium is best in organic form, such as kelp meal, green sand, and granite meal. Ingrid's soil is decomposed granite, high in potassium, I don't see any droopy necks in her Austins whatsoever ... she also pruned her grafted-Austins down.

For my potassium, I use cocoa mulch, NPK 3-1-4, before a rain, which wash off the chocolate scent, so it doesn't attract animals .. dogs get sick eating that stuff.

Conclusion: if you have good rainfall and mild temp, pruning before spring is a good idea, I'm impressed with dutch88 Golden Cel. in Australia.


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RE: Golden Celebration growing against a wall - advice

About rootstock: most European nurseries graft their roses. If the rose is grafted, which, if you purchased it, it almost certainly will be, it will have a thickened area of the "trunk" at about soil level from which the canes grow. I believe that most nurseries in Italy, France, England, and Germany use Laxa as their rootstock for shrub roses: Laxa is related to the dog rose, makes a deep root, and does well in clay and summer drought, so it's good for Italy. Some nurseries graft on Multiflora, perhaps Dutch nurseries more than in the other countries I've mentioned. Personally I'm a bit scared of Multiflora, it seems to sucker rather readily, though Laxa can sucker as well
The problem with rootstock is that it can sucker--send up its own canes and begin to grow--and overwhelm the grafted part of the rose, the part you want. Rootstock roses tend not to be highly ornamental, so you don't want this to occur. Generally gardeners try to keep this from happening by planting the graft under a few inches of soil. If this isn't feasible you just have to keep a sharp eye out for rootstock suckers and eliminate them as they appear. The canes will look different from the grafted part of the rose.
Many, not all, roses grow just fine on their own roots, but in Italy to get an own root rose you usually have to propagate it yourself. I grow mostly old roses so have no ethical problems violating breeders' rights when I grow roses from cuttings. I know this last paragraph goes beyond the scope of your question, but I did want you to understand that a rose doesn't necessarily have to be grafted to grow well. With an own root rose you don't have the problem of rootstock suckers, and possibly the rose will live longer. Also, if you plant the graft deep, as I mentioned before, the rose may eventually send roots out from its grafted part and begin growing on its own roots.
This is just a quick overview, I hope it's helpful.
It's good to hear of another gardener in Italy!
Melissa


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RE: Golden Celebration growing against a wall - advice

Melissa, you helped me a lot, thanks ... I'm glad I grow own-roots!


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RE: Golden Celebration growing against a wall - advice

  • Posted by seil z6b MI (My Page) on
    Sat, Jul 6, 13 at 20:01

I think GC can be grown either free standing as a large shrub or trellised as a climber. Free standing the canes will droop and fountain because they're pretty long but even trellised the blooms will hang. They seem to nod naturally. Mine is trellised and gets to about 12 feet tall each season.


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RE: Golden Celebration growing against a wall - advice

My GC looks nothing like these beautiful pictures but that is my fault because I no longer can garden the way I used to but I do love the blooms I get---it is a lovely rose.

Florence


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RE: Golden Celebration growing against a wall - advice

seil, that's a lovely and very impressive GC. I wish I had room for a second GC to grow on a trellis. I'm posting a pic from early June of my Golden Celebration--he's very wide and between six and seven feet tall and grows almost against the corner of the porch, but is free standing. Diane


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RE: Golden Celebration growing against a wall - advice

  • Posted by seil z6b MI (My Page) on
    Mon, Jul 8, 13 at 0:17

Thanks, Nana. That picture was taken the day after my show this year. I cut 33 blooms off of it to do arrangements and show the day before.


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RE: Golden Celebration growing against a wall - advice

Melissa, thank you so much!! Really, that answers a lot of questions.
I will examine all my roses' "trunks" tonight... I'm so curious!
But another questions, so I'm buying a David Austin rose from my local nursery... and it comes from DA directly and has the DA label on it, does that still mean it could be grafted?


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RE: Golden Celebration growing against a wall - advice

Seil and Diane, those are stunning!

Here are some photos of mine at the moment - I had to tie them to stakes this weekend because they were literally sweeping the floor.

I'm glad to hear it's sort of usual for them to be droopy but I worry that mine are TOO thin. Do you think they will get larger and stronger with time?


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RE: Golden Celebration growing against a wall - advice

Sorry I still haven't figured out how to post more than 1 photo...


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RE: Golden Celebration growing against a wall - advice

Annalyssa, there is no way to post more than one photo per post as long as you use the forum method of posting--which is what you are doing.

However, you can post multiple photos if you get an account at a free service like photobucket.com, upload all your photos there, and then copy their HTML CODE and insert it in this message box on this forum. In that case, you can insert as many HTML CODES into the message box as you want.

Alternately, if you know the correct CODE, you can insert photos from your own files directly into the forum message box also--and insert multiple photos that way.

Your rose (and house) are just lovely! However, I do think that small space in which you have GC growing just is not going to work at all for a big-growing rose like GC will become.

Kate


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RE: Golden Celebration growing against a wall - advice

The roses from the David Austin nursery are grafted. The only European nursery that I know of that sells roses own root is Nino Sanremo in Italy. They carry Austins. As far as I know they sell roses only directly, not through other nurseries. They're nice people and they have beautiful plants, but when I made two good-sized orders of roses from them back in 2005-06 I received more mislabelled roses that I have ever gotten from a nursery, and they were unable to correct their mistakes, though willing. I don't know whether they ever got this issue straightened out, but quite a bit of time has passed since then.
You're welcome. I love writing about plants when someone's interested, and so do a lot of other people here.
Melissa


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RE: Golden Celebration growing against a wall - advice

Melissa, thank you! I've just been reading about grafting since I realized I have no idea about how roses are propagated (this is going to be SUCH a learning curve)...
Quick question, are "budding" and "grafting" synonymous?

Kate, thanks for the explanation regarding the photos... and I think you might be right GC being too big for this space (Diane's is gigantic!) should I see what happens/try training it as a climber? I really love their blooms and foliage...

Annalyssa


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RE: Golden Celebration growing against a wall - advice

I don't think it makes any difference whether you grow GC as a big bush or as a climber. It will need the same amount of space for the roots to grow and spread as the rose matures--and my concern is that the small container you are trying to grow GC in doesn't leave enough room for normal root development--nor for adequate rainfall to get to the roots.

I personally would move GC to a different area where it would not need to be cramped up in a small space.

Kate


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RE: Golden Celebration growing against a wall - advice

Hi Kate, thanks for the reply.
I don't know if that makes a difference in your opinion but those aren't containers. There was a circular space left for planting when they made the walkway (surrounded by terracotta tiles so it looks like a containter), but under the 3 inches of concrete & tile of the walkway, it's all soil. The jasmine is also growing in the same spot. Granted, it will be compacted, unworked soil...

That's true about rainwater...

Anna-Lyssa


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RE: Golden Celebration growing against a wall - advice

Hi Anna-Lyssa: I look at your pictures of GC blooms. My blooms don't droop like that, even in its 3rd year, after I moved it and chopped half the root off. Putting gypsum (calcium sulfate) strengthen cell walls of plants. Gypsum is also used to break up compacted soil, and de-salt saline soil and water. My soil is limestone clay, and rain water (acidic at pH 5.6) helps to release calcium from my soil.

Gypsum (a natural product) is safer to use than chemical potassium fertilizer. I posted info. on both in the English Roses Forum. See below:

Here is a link that might be useful: Thickness of leaves and calcium


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RE: Golden Celebration growing against a wall - advice

Anna-Lyssa, your GC looks great. He will be naturally floppy for a while, and as he achieves age the canes will firm up, but there will always be some "fountaining" canes. My GC is grafted on Dr. Huey, and came in an official Austin pot with tags, though I bought GC locally. I love your beautiful and atmospheric home. Diane


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RE: Golden Celebration growing against a wall - advice

Anna-Lyssa,
I'm not knowledgeable about budding and grafting, as I don't propagate my roses that way (I'm rather hit-and-miss on propagating in general, though I've tried to root so many cuttings over the years that I have ended up with quite a few home-grown roses). I believe that with grafting you use twigs and with budding you use growth buds (those little bumps on the cane, usually nestled in the base of a leaf, from which new canes grow) of the rose you want to propagate, inserting them in the rootstock. Budding requires less material and so you can get more plants from the mother rose. But the result is the same: a two part rose, the ornamental part, one variety, growing on top and the sturdy root system, a different variety, below.
The other way to propagate a variety is to root it from cuttings, shoots taking at the proper stage of growth and at the right time of year, and stuck in light soil and kept watered and comfortable until they grow roots of their own. If a rose is growing on its own roots (not on a rootstock) it may sucker--some roses do this, some don't. You can also take these suckers and start new plants from them.
Grafting, budding, and rooting from cuttings and suckers are all forms of vegetative propagation--I believe it's called--which means that the resulting roses are clones of the parent plants, genetically identical. There is also sexual reproduction, where a rose flowers, is fertilized, forms hips containing seeds, the seeds are sown and in time grow new roses. These will be different from the parents, perhaps startlingly so as garden roses are a heavily hybridized bunch.
Melissa


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RE: Golden Celebration growing against a wall - advice

Strawberryhill, thanks for such great advice. Our soil is quite clay-ey and I'll definitely take all this info to heart when I prepare the big beds for the fall. I have so much to learn in that regard and I think I've already made a bunch of mistakes...

Diane, thanks for the reassurance and the compliment about the house :) My boyfriend inherited it from his much-loved great-aunt and so it's really special that we get to move in and take care of the house and garden and love it again after it being pretty much abandoned for several years.
One of the most exciting things was seeing all the bulbs pop up this spring and finding out what Great-Aunt Maddalena planted decades ago.... tulips and gorgeous lilies and irises...

Now I feel like it's a great privilege to take care of her garden.

Melissa, wow! Thanks! :) You know, I think our uncle has done some propagating (I don't know which way) and I'm going to ask him to show me....
Thanks for opening up a world....

So I think I'll just leave the GCs there for now, tie them to stakes when I think they need it, and see what they look like in the fall and decide.
I'll post a photo and let you know.
Also going to study fertilizers....

Thanks again for all this valuable help!

Anna-Lyssa


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RE: Golden Celebration growing against a wall - advice

Anna Lyssa----I've also been admiring your home and even more so after reading the history---I'm sure Great Aunt would be thrilled to know that someone is enjoying the bulbs she planted so many years ago---that is one of the rewards of moving into an older home
I hope that someday someone will enjoy all the bulbs I've planted over the years---
My plant was very preductive this year----this little bouquet of GC and Abe Darby is from a couple of years ago .

Florence


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RE: Golden Celebration growing against a wall - advice

A better picture of Golden Celebration

Florence


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RE: Golden Celebration growing against a wall - advice

Florence: Thank you for those lovely bouquets ...those are the biggest blooms I have ever seen, with unique coloring. I admire how well you and your roses look. You are a role model for me.


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RE: Golden Celebration growing against a wall - advice

Thank you strawberry----here is one bloom still on the bush


Florence


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RE: Golden Celebration growing against a wall - advice

Florence, those photos are lovely! :)
Thanks for sharing them!

Anna-Lyssa


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RE: Golden Celebration growing against a wall - advice

What a beautiful classic setting! What's holding the jasmine to their posts? Could you tie into that or the jasmine itself as the rose gains height, even threading the rose's uprights through the loops of jasmine for support? For the rose by the solid wall, you could use wire or monofilament string & vine anchors such as Trumax makes without marring your wall. Can see half-round copper trellis conforming to the shape of the tile supporting your roses without intruding. Don't see a problem with the way they're planted (look at the jasmine, as you say) & the tile may indeed insulate the roots from heat & cold. Love your vision.

Planted Golden Celebration 4? years ago in the center of a garden bed that spans the front porch. Saw within a year that it wanted to grow tall & left it to its own devices to arch for two years trying to figure out how to support it vertically. Assembled a 2-foot square copper pipe obelisk around it rising 9' from ground level. It's not tied to the supports but simply confined within them, which shapes it into a pillar form with the branches finding their own way within the verticals & spilling out over the cross pieces. Like this tall narrow yet full effect, the structure it bears as a centerpiece & the room given other plants in that bed. If the obelisk were removed today, the rose would easily arch down to a width of 15' & overpower the scale of the planting & its neighbors.

Mine started with lax thin canes but has firmed up well over time so the blossoms' stems face outwards instead of nodding as they did at first. The framework supporting it allows it to arch gently & it has many flowering shoots all along the branches. Just counted 18 along 2' of cane, and many of those are budding their own clusters. I've never pruned it, just deadhead the sprays. No dieback here in central Virginia just east of the Blue Ridge Mountains & no disease despite my lazy no-spray ways. At first the blooms came mostly one to stem, but ever since has put out sprays of at least five. Repeats so rapidly, with so many clusters budding as others are blooming that I'd have to call it continuous from mid-Spring past the first frosts - anywhere from mid-April through to Christmas. Love the scent & the nuance of color. Only in temps in the high 90's does it bloom plain yelllow. In the early flush its first Spring after planting the preceding Summer, some blooms were half bright tangerine & half egg-yolk yellow, as if they had a line drawn down their centers. This rose has never ceased to delight & amaze me. May it do so for you!

Have you checked Help Me Find? The photo tab has many glorious pictures including one from Genoa. Enter the rose's name in the search box.

Here is a link that might be useful: search a rose

This post was edited by vasue on Thu, Jul 25, 13 at 14:51


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RE: Golden Celebration growing against a wall - advice

  • Posted by hoovb z9 Southern CA (My Page) on
    Thu, Jul 25, 13 at 15:04

The thing about the small open area is that although there is soil under there, it is soil with very limited access to oxygen. Roots need oxygen as well as soil and water.

Is there any way you can make those holes bigger, as in moving the sidewalk out a few feet? That of course would be the ideal. You have a lovely home.

Here's my GC. The Acer palmatum there on the left (red foliage) is 2 meters tall, to give you an idea of the size.
Golden Celebration with Emperor I Acer palmatum photo a3452_zps3f28b458.jpg


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RE: Golden Celebration growing against a wall - advice

vasue, thank you for the suggestion! I think training the rose through the Jasmine is a great idea and will be so beautiful!

I'm really loving my GCs already - they're so graceful and I love the shape of the leaves and of course the blooms and fragrance! Earlier in the season they were overwhelmed by the Jasmine, but now that that's done blooming you really get a waft of the GC when you walk to the front door. It's beautiful!
Plus they look amazing even in the hot, hot weather we've been having, and have bloomed nonstop.
You're right about the colour - earlier on they were so golden and honey-ish (photo). Now they're much paler, more yellow.

hoovb, i like your idea about making the holes bigger. I'm actually trying to convince everyone that we should make another hole on the right side of the house which is just bare and surrounded by walkway and (obviously) needs a climber. If I manage that, when the workers are here I'll just sort of casually say "oh hey, do you think we could try to widen these while we're at it" all innocent like I haven't been thinking about it all this time....

Thanks for the nice compliments about the house. I love it too, I love every stone of it!

Annalyssa


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RE: Golden Celebration growing against a wall - advice

Annalyssa----I'm really enjoying this post----I'm also enjoying your newfound interest in roses.
I love your home and the history of your family----it is wonderful that you love and appreciate what your home represents
I have always been sad that I was not able to buy back my grandparents home --I really wanted to raise my kids in the home where my father grew up.
Keep us posted about your progress with roses

Florence


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RE: Golden Celebration growing against a wall - advice

astonishingly, there are roses grown all over Europe in the tiniest holes and as long as the roots are actually getting to ground soil and not contained within a complete container, the minuscule surface opening won't matter at all - heck, there are immense street trees grown with the entire trunk encased by pavement. As for oxygen, there will be plenty of it in the interstices between the soil grains, even heavy clay, as long as drainage remains good - the big issue will be that compacted earth but 3 feet down is a fair depth. For some plants, the shading by pavers is an absolute bonus since the roots are cool and as long as they manage a decent run underground, there is no need to worry - although you will have to water patiently and slowly, dripping a can over the course of a few minutes to allow water to penetrate deeply enough and not simply run off. Once the rose is established (after a full growing season, ideally, but certainly for at least 3 months), irrigation will not be a major issue either.
All Austin roses take a few years (at least 3) to make fatter stronger canes - for several years, they will nod and flop - pruning will certainly help to thicken the woody stems but as with most things, time is the answer.


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RE: Golden Celebration growing against a wall - advice

Amen Camp! I love your wisdom and boundless experience ... there's hope to my rock-hard clay after all. I have success using steel barbecue stick to poke holes, then fill them with coarse sand, so water can go deep below. Thank you, Camp, for the info. about pruning to thicken the woody stems.


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RE: Golden Celebration growing against a wall - advice

Florence, I will definitely keep you posted and upload photos as time goes on!
I think it's really special that a little question about roses allows you to connect in some small way with people about things like homes and families....

campanula, thank you for the reply! I love the common sense (wisdom) in that and the reminder to have patience, which for a new gardener is much needed! I've never lived through ONE season much less three years of rose growing, imagine how myopic my vision is! So, thank you!

Annalyssa


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RE: Golden Celebration growing against a wall - advice

Hi all!

I just wanted to post a follow-up to this question you all helped me with!
First of all, you are all so wise... :)

Ok, so after its first summer, this is what I can say about the "GC against the wall" trial. Definitely a rose too large for this spot (of course, right?).
Anyhow... the one to the right of the door is doing fine! No blooms at this very moment, but it's healthy and looks ok.
It's a challenge keeping it looking tidy, but training it horizontally is creating fabulous growth and it's a lot of fun (and fragrant!).

Meanwhile, the one to the left of the door near the jasmin is, as you foretold, struggling. It has blackspot and looks gangly and sad. I didn't take a photo because it's just too embarassing.

I'm not sure what we'll do about it.... See what happens this spring.

But we really love Golden Celebration (now that I'm wild for antique roses, the DAs have somewhat lost their glimmer, but GC remains beloved) and have decided to get another and give her a chance to be big and full and happy in the front yard flowerbed (the lilies flowerbed)...

More to come!... :)

Thanks all!

Annalyssa


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RE: Golden Celebration growing against a wall - advice

I love it too! It's one of the few Austins that will remain here as long as I do.

Jeri


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RE: Golden Celebration growing against a wall - advice

Jeri,

I love your Golden Celebration. I am curious, what is the gorgeous pink rose peeking around the left side of your G.C. in the photo?

Lynn


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RE: Golden Celebration growing against a wall - advice

Hello to you, too, Annalyssa! I'm glad your rose is doing well! And glad fall is here. I'm very busy in the garden these days.
Melissa


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RE: Golden Celebration growing against a wall - advice

  • Posted by dutch88 Adelaide, Australia (My Page) on
    Sat, Oct 26, 13 at 18:22

Sorry it took this long to get back here.
The apricot rose in my original photo is Pat Austin.
The photo here is a close up of Golden Celebration in late autumn, looking very golden. :)


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