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Identify 3-colored rose

Posted by LynneDale 5b or 6 (My Page) on
Sun, Jul 13, 14 at 9:44

This rose is known to me only as "Beppe's rose", Beppe being my sister-in-law's Dutch grandmother who was born in about 1890. It originated on an old farm in Sutton Massachusetts and has been passed around to various members of our extended family. The rose has an arching habit, although my brother managed to prune it into a dense shrub. The blooms change color as they age, resulting in three shades of pink. Someone referred to it as "Three Sisters Rose", but I was unable to find anything when I searched for that, and no images on google resembled it. Does anyone know what it might be?


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RE: Identify 3-colored rose

  • Posted by AquaEyes 7 New Brunswick, NJ (My Page) on
    Sun, Jul 13, 14 at 11:24

There is a rose often called "Seven Sisters" which might be what was meant. Take a look at the link below.

:-)

~Christopher

Here is a link that might be useful: 'Seven Sisters' at HelpMeFind

This post was edited by AquaEyes on Sun, Jul 13, 14 at 14:56


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RE: Identify 3-colored rose

That link takes you to a YouTube video from the Bill Mahar show.

See the correct link for "Seven Sisters"

Here is a link that might be useful: 7 Sisters at HMF (really!)


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RE: Identify 3-colored rose

The rose officially considered Seven Sisters isn't hardy enough to grow that far north. There are other roses that are sometimes referred to as Seven Sisters that are hardier. The most common one is De La Grifferaie.


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RE: Identify 3-colored rose

  • Posted by AquaEyes 7 New Brunswick, NJ (My Page) on
    Sun, Jul 13, 14 at 14:55

ACK! Sorry, I must not have hit "copy" and that was the last thing in my clipboard. I went back and fixed the link. Thanks!

:-)

~Christopher


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RE: Identify 3-colored rose

I see we suddenly have two "Seven Sisters" threads going. Just to clarify: Most parts of the USA seem to have a rose that locals call "Seven Sisters." Nearly all of them have the wrong rose -- De La Grifferaie or Russelliana in the North, Tausendschoen, Dorothy Perkins, or Red Dorothy Perkins in the South, or, often, just "the rose that Grandma grew and we've always called it that." The "real," original 'Seven Sisters' is Rosa multiflora platyphylla, as painted by Redoute. It is marginally cold-hardy to Zone 7, very strictly once-flowering, a moderate climber. Its foliage is unique, and probably the easiest way to determine whether you've got the "real thing." Leaves are large, with the leaflets convex-shaped (like the top half of a pillow) rather than lying flat. Also, the leaves are noticeably fuzzy on their upper surface, not smooth or shiny. Stipules are quite fringed, as in all multiflora types. The real thing also tends to make highly zig-zagged stems. So I agree that the rose pictured in this thread is not the "real" 'Seven Sisters', but could very well be De La Grifferaie or another local "Seven Sisters" thing.

Here is a link that might be useful: Photos of 'Seven Sisters'


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