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'Bridesmaid'

Posted by jerijen Sunset Z24 (My Page) on
Sat, Aug 9, 14 at 20:30

Most of you who can grow Tea Roses know, or grow, 'Catherine Mermet.'

For all her fame, I never "cottoned to" her pale color -- and she tended to mildew here.

I like much better this 1892 sport, disc. in the U.S.

The color has a lot more "bounce," which makes the bloom far more eye-catching. And, for whatever reason, 'Bridesmaid' doesn't mildew for me.

I like it A LOT.

APPARENTLY there was an earlier sport of 'Catherine Mermet,' which is described as being a red rose. 'Waban' was introduced with an immense fanfare, and fell flat on its face. Nothing I've read has actually said WHAT was wrong with 'Waban,' just that it was disappointing.

I can't help wondering, though, if 'Waban' might not have survived, SOMEWHERE, and might turn up some day, as an unidentified Found red Tea Rose.

(JERI)

This post was edited by jerijen on Sun, Aug 10, 14 at 14:20


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: 'Bridesmaid'

Beautiful photo, Jeri! I hadn't heard of 'Waban' before, but that really would be a wonderful find.

Jay


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RE: 'Bridesmaid'

I had heard the name, but not made the connection.

Apparently, a lot of people had shied away from 'Bridesmaid,' because 'Waban' had been a disappointment.

But we don't know why it was disappointing! Maybe WE would like it!

And, maybe ... maybe it's hiding out there, somewhere.

JERI


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RE: 'Bridesmaid'

Jeri - do you know WHEN 'Waban' was described as "red"? In the 19th century rose folks seem to use "red" to describe dark pink roses a lot - just like folks call some roses "blue" now when they are really mauve.

Jackie


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RE: 'Bridesmaid'

The References section on HMF gives a number of descriptions from the late Nineteenth Century. The listed colors were considered "red" regarding Tea roses. "The Book of the Rose" (1984) stated, "Another sport from Catherine Mermet, also from America. Not yet sufficiently tested, but at present it does not often come good." "The Garden" magazine (1894) wrote, "The Bride is now regarded equivalent in merit to its parent, but Waban and Bridesmaid do not possess such great distinction." I'm sure searching for more references in the old rose books listed in Henry's thread the other say should provide even more comments about its performance. Kim

Here is a link that might be useful: References


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RE: 'Bridesmaid'

Apparently, there was some confusion between 'Waban' and 'Bridesmaid' -- which ain't surprising, as they came out only a year apart (maybe less, really).

But I have to say that if 'Waban' was anywhere near as good as 'Bridesmaid,' why -- I wish I could try it.

Here's another look at 'Bridesmaid.'


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RE: 'Bridesmaid'

It's funny, Jeri - when I looked at your first photo, I thought "What a great photo". Then I thought "But I LIKE Catherine Mermet's pale color". And then I scrolled down to your second photo and lost my heart! Lovely, lovely!

Laura


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RE: 'Bridesmaid'

Having had Catherine Mermet briefly, and seeing these photos, I think Bridesmaid is quite an improvement. I really had no idea it was this pretty, however.

Ingrid


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RE: 'Bridesmaid'

I had her and loved her. She was not in a good spot though and when I moved her, she died. I would love to have another. I do like Catherine Mermet color, however. They are both lovely roses.


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RE: 'Bridesmaid'

It's not that I DISLIKED Cat Mermet's color -- I just think this is prettier. In fact, in a world where I have to pick and choose what roses I can irrigate -- Bridesmaid wins. (Her foliage is better here, too.)

JACKIE:

Waban was introduced in 1891 (Bridesmaid in 1892).

I agree with you. At the end of the 19th Century, people WERE still using "red," or "light red," to describe roses WE would call "deep pink," or "pink," or even "rose."

Kim Rupert's 'Lynnie' is oftficially "pink" but in my normally-cool conditions, it is commonly closer to "rose."

JERI


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RE: 'Bridesmaid'

She is a very healthy rose in my climate too. Our horrid summers don't seem to faze her. She doesn't bloom in the heat but her foliage looks pretty ok by this time of year, which is saying something, considering the endless, awful heat here.


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RE: 'Bridesmaid'

Heck, THIS year, our coastal temps haven't been all that cool, either. And with less and less water . . .


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