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Three new bands

Posted by lou_texas 8a N Central TX (My Page) on
Thu, Sep 12, 13 at 10:57

I received three bands last week and have them potted up. The Pretty Jessica and Rainbow look as healthy and happy as can be. The Annie Laurie McDowell has sunburned leaves (it was sitting right beside the other two) and may not make it. Don't know why - it wasn't in all day sun and I didn't think the sun was that strong for the limited time it was in sun. I immediately removed it to shade. Do you have any suggestions? I'm keeping it moist and in shade on my front porch until it shows some life. Thanks, Lou


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Three new bands

It sounds as if you are doing everything right for it. Here in sunny California, I always give new baby roses some sun protection for at least the first week. I use shade cloth, or put them in a shady location. Sometimes they are grown up in those bands in very protected sort of green house environments, and they need to transition before they are exposed to a lot of direct sun.

Jackie


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RE: Three new bands

It sounds as if you're doing what's necessary, Lou. Who knows why you experienced what you did with them? Perhaps the two which didn't complain were better rooted or older, more hardened off plants? Perhaps there was more perlite in the pot of the ALmD so it dried out and fried faster? It might have come from greenhouse conditions more recently than the other two. Perhaps, being smaller bushes compared to ALmD being a larger climber, the Pretty Jessica and Rainbow were more mature for their type considering the balance between top and root growth requirements, thereby better able to endure the heat they experienced? There are too many unknown variables to know the "why" for sure, but your remedy for the issue seems the best you can do for them. Good luck! Kim


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RE: Three new bands

I bet with your good care that it will recover. I hope they all do well.


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RE: Three new bands

Sounds like that perlite...
Whoever said perlite could do bad things?

Here is a link that might be useful: sandandsun on perlite


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RE: Three new bands

Thanks for helping point out the need for perlite in commercial production. For commercial production of bands to be made available for interstate commerce, a soil less medium is required. It is illegal to mail "soil" due to the probability of transporting pests and diseases. Mist is essential for large scale, own root production, where perlite is required to prevent the cuttings from rotting in too heavy mixes. The more mist used, the greater the percentage of perlite needed. Bands dry out quite quickly in many climates, necessitating more frequent irrigation. The drainage benefits of perlite aid in preventing them from rotting. Add the much lighter weight of perlite compared to sand, and you have the postage saving element. I guess that helps explain why bands should be potted as soon as possible upon receipt? Kim


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RE: Three new bands

Lou, I'll keep my fingers crossed for you. Since that rose is so hard to come by I'm really hoping yours makes it. Mine has been in a 1-gallon pot for some time but I still keep it in an area where it gets only early morning sun, and I have it behind a lavender bush so that the pot is shaded at all times. It's also double potted. Growth has been slow but as long as there is growth in this heat I'm satisfied.

Ingrid


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re: perlite

The original post doesn't mention perlite. Hmm, what does that mean?

I made no reference to commercial use, neither was any implied.

Also, I'm not being paid to solve commercial production issues or to provide help to such endeavors here. I do not promote products here - and certainly not any personal ones. I have none for sale. IS THAT CLEAR?

I do however, as I've sincerely expressed and demonstrated, want the home gardener to succeed.

In my referenced post on perlite, I was attempting to help the home gardener realize that perlite is not one's friend in the climates with the specified conditions (at a minimum). So the idea that bands containing perlite should be repotted as soon as practical is extremely good advice. Further, when repotting, as much of the perlite as possible should be removed - as much as possible without damaging the roots.


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RE: Three new bands

I apologize for seeming to hijack your thread, Lou. But as this (and another) thread from the Roses and Antique Forums were cross referenced to the one linked below, and as the question I asked in the other thread was answered here, I guess it would be advantageous to cross link the other thread on the Organic Rose Growing forum here so things can be understood in context. Kim

Here is a link that might be useful: Hello (Organic Rose Growing Forum)


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RE: Three new bands

Wow!!!! I am stunned almost speechless by the post you linked to, Kim.


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RE: Three new bands

Oh my, oh my. I didn't realize that we ate babies for breakfast over here.


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RE: Three new bands

Wow, talk about being mean and a bully! I think SAS shows us that that means! Yikes


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RE: Three new bands

One of the most obnoxiously preachy, condescending things I've read in ages. (Kim's link) that sort of thing is guaranteed to create rifts, not erase them. Classic "them VS us" nonsense.


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RE: Three new bands

Lou: something to consider; roses freshly shipped have been in total darkness for three days or more (usually) during shipping to you, and that is enough time to make the foliage very sensitive to strong light. Even a hour in full sun can scorch foliage under these conditions. Next time, give the plants two days in shade to acclimate and then gradually move them into brighter light.
That said, even if you do scorch all the foliage off, it will almost certainly recover with a new set of eaves.


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RE: Three new bands

Lou.......

In my experience, there are so many different variables that can impact how roses planted at the same time and the same way that it's almost impossible to expect all roses to take off equally well.

Potting up your new bands and keeping them shaded will help them with the stress incurred in changing from a greenhouse environment, shipping environment, transplanting to the larger container and adjusting to your climate.

I've never bothered to remove the perlite from the roots of my bands as I prefer not to disturb the roots at all. The percentage of perlite to potting soil seems insignificant to me. Of course, I may be gardening in a more arid climate than SAS. Our experience varies ... lol.

SAS ... no one gets paid to share their experiences on the GW forums, so I don't know where that one came from in your post. I haven't a clue as to why you are shouting about it, either. I do think there are too many variables to think there is only one way to help home gardeners. I haven't found perlite to be a problem with bands in my climate.

Smiles,
Lyn


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RE: Three new bands

Lyn -- bless you, my dear. Always gracious. Love ya'.

Jeri


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RE: Three new bands

I do so enjoy this forum - it is full of very nice people, some very knowledgeable, some less, but almost everyone tries to be helpful.

The link Kim provides above is indeed shocking - it reveals so much about some folks who enjoy looking for something negative to complain about in every little thing - you can always find that (or hallucinate it) if you try hard enough.

Most folks on this forum do what I do - if a post is annoying or otherwise unpleasant, just ignore it and move on to something positive.

Which brings me to Lou, who asked a very good, rational question at the beginning of this thread. That question has been answered correctly several times above, but I haven't seen Lou post again. Lou, I hope you were not intimidated by one person's paranoia - it has nothing to do with you.

Personally, I am really interested in finding out how your little rose is doing - please keep us posted about that - thanks.

Jackie


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RE: Three new bands

I am one who does precisely what Jackie says: I listen to the advice/information given on these forums and when a nasty remark is made, I ignore it. Ideally, no mean remarks would ever be made, but that is not the world we live in and Kim's link (thank you, Kim) is a shining example of how NOT to voice our disagreement.
Molly


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RE: Three new bands

might just be me.....but I generally find people who refer to themselves in the third person are often a bit.....dodgy.

Campanula signs off....with a tiny bit of pot stirring.


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