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It's been a busy Summer in my yard...

Posted by AquaEyes 7 New Brunswick, NJ (My Page) on
Mon, Sep 2, 13 at 14:44

I've been hacking away at a big and over-grown Callery pear tree in my yard to let more sun into the yard. My tool for the job was a basic hand-saw, so this has been an on-going project.

Tree limbs were then stripped down, with leaves and twigs snipped up with pruners to form a leaf-litter mulch, spread out over cardboard I laid down to smother grass and weeds. Thick branches were sawed into logs to form edging. Roses were placed out in the beds in their anticipated planting spots (and moved around plenty of times until I was finally satisfied with their placement).

Today I neatened up the remaining patch of "lawn" enough to take a couple pictures and share them here. I have plenty others I've been taking throughout this process, beginning last year before I even started anything. Those pics can be seen on my Facebook album linked below (it's public). In a week or two I'll be having 12 cubic yards of mulch delivered to spread out over the leaf-litter layer. And over the winter, I'll be picking out companion perennials.

:-)

~Christopher

Here is a link that might be useful: NJ Garden Pics Album on Facebook


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: It's been a busy Summer in my yard...

  • Posted by AquaEyes 7 New Brunswick, NJ (My Page) on
    Mon, Sep 2, 13 at 14:46

And one more...from a slightly different angle.

:-)

~Christopher


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RE: It's been a busy Summer in my yard...

Looking good! How many you got in there? What are you considering for companions? Where are the HPs located and your r. moschata?
Nice work!
Susan


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RE: It's been a busy Summer in my yard...

  • Posted by AquaEyes 7 New Brunswick, NJ (My Page) on
    Mon, Sep 2, 13 at 15:16

Under the limbed-up arbor vitae, and behind a railroad-ties, is one of the two Gallica beds (with "musk" bookends). In the left corner, against the garage, is "Secret Garden Musk Climber", then 'Charles de Mills', then 'Georges Vibert', then "Sombreuil" which will be trained against the fence, then 'Cardinal de Richelieu', and "Darlow's Enigma" behind the pine tree. The other Gallica bed is not seen in the pic, but is also underneath limbed-up arbor vitae. From left to right there will be 'Rosa moschata', "Sissinghurst Castle", 'Tricolore de Flandre', 'Tuscany Superb' and 'Reverend Seidel'.

The rest of the wrap-around bed has different classes all mixed together. The individual roses were placed based on size, growth (climbers are against the fence and will be trained onto three horizontal wires stretched across the whole length), and flower-color (light next to dark, with the few whites and yellows dotted around). I basically ignored class and paid attention only to how each rose will grow, and tried to place them so neighbors would compliment each other.

How many? Well, though you can't see them all in these two pics, there are 45 -- not including the five planned for the other Gallica bed not seen in the pic, not including the two planted so far in the front yard, not including the pot-pet collection of very fragrant crimson and dark-red HTs, and not including the dozen or so others I have yet to place or which will also remain pot-pets.

Companion perennials? I have a few criteria -- I'd love more fragrant plants, but will accept non-fragrant plants in purple-blue-white colors. I have a huge "possibilities" list that includes Dianthus, Campanulas, Delphiniums, Digitalis, Iris, Catmint, Salvia, Veronica, Sedums, various herbs, and plenty others. I'm sticking to cool colors -- the warmest would be soft yellows. I started out by looking through the Bluestone Perennials website and picking favorites and possibilities. Right now, I'm looking to see what I can grow from seed and what I'll be buying as plants from Bluestone. But next year is the perennial layer. The following year will be the final touch -- Clematis and self-seeding annuals. And that will be in the ground just before I start grad school.

:-)

~Christopher

This post was edited by AquaEyes on Mon, Sep 2, 13 at 15:17


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RE: It's been a busy Summer in my yard...

  • Posted by AquaEyes 7 New Brunswick, NJ (My Page) on
    Mon, Sep 2, 13 at 15:20

Oh, and I know it sounds really crammed, but the bed actually extends much deeper by the deck. You can't see it in these pics, but from edging to fence is about 15-20' at the deepest.

:-)

~Christopher


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RE: It's been a busy Summer in my yard...

Sounds well-planned and will grow up to be very nice! I like seeing the beginnings. I like your natural log edging very much.


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RE: It's been a busy Summer in my yard...

  • Posted by AquaEyes 7 New Brunswick, NJ (My Page) on
    Mon, Sep 2, 13 at 15:40

It stopped raining (for now), so I took some more.....

Hugging the deck, starting from the right and going to the left, I have "Bermuda Spice", 'Rose du Roi (original)', 'Paul Neyron' (tip of one stem against the blue recycling can), 'Reine des Violettes' (against the stairs), 'Abraham Darby', and 'Nouveau Monde' (with one long cane trained horizontally along the deck railing).

Second row: in front of 'Paul Neyron' is 'Mlle. Blanche Lafitte' (who is recovering from defoliation and is barely visible in the pic -- look for the white name-tag), with 'Lady Hillingdon' next on the left (again, look for the white name tag). In the lower left corner is "Rose de Rescht" with 'Quatre Saisons Blanc Mousseaux' diagonally left-behind it.

:-)

~Christopher

This post was edited by AquaEyes on Mon, Sep 2, 13 at 16:01


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RE: It's been a busy Summer in my yard...

  • Posted by AquaEyes 7 New Brunswick, NJ (My Page) on
    Mon, Sep 2, 13 at 15:42

'Orfeo' is growing up the trunk of the Callery pear. In front and to the right of the tree trunk is 'Quatre Saisons Blanc Mousseaux', and in front and to the right of it is "Rose de Rescht". To the left of 'Quatre Saisons Blanc Mousseaux' is 'Yolande d'Aragon'. Vintage Gardens' version of 'Mme Laurette Messimy' (pink with yellow petal-bases, like a softer-colored 'Comtesse du Cayla') is in front and to the left of 'Quatre Saisons Blanc Mousseaux', and still in its pot (against the log-edging) is 'Tamora'. I need to keep an open pathway going back to where the ladder is now, so I'm not sure about putting 'Tamora' there.

Where the ladder is now will be 'Yellow Sweeheart, Climbing' to be trained against the fence (I needed a thornless rose next to the walkway). To the left of the ladder, to be trained against the fence, is 'Ferdinand Pichard'. And cut off on the left edge of the pic is 'Jude the Obscure' (it's in the row in front of the fence-climber row).

:-)

~Christopher

This post was edited by AquaEyes on Mon, Sep 2, 13 at 16:16


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RE: It's been a busy Summer in my yard...

  • Posted by AquaEyes 7 New Brunswick, NJ (My Page) on
    Mon, Sep 2, 13 at 15:43

Starting with the fence-climber row, from right (by the ladder) to the left is 'Ferdinand Pichard', 'Purple Skyliner', 'Bubble Bath' and "Bleu Magenta". I'm going to put eye-ring screws in the vertical fence posts at three levels (where the horizontal posts cross them) and string three rows of wire horizontally across the whole length of the fence. Depending on how they grow, some canes will go high against the fence, some low, so that there will be overlap between them.

In front of the fence climbers, from right to left (follow the white name tags), is the middle row, beginning with 'Jude the Obscure', 'Mme de Sevigne', and 'Pierre Notting'.

In front and slightly to the left of 'Jude the Obscure' is 'Monsieur Boncenne' which is sort of in its own row.

Against the log edging, beginning on the right and moving to the left, is 'Mme Dore', 'Botzaris', and 'Sweet Chariot' (which has been pegged against the log edging -- "miniature" my butt!).

:-)

~Christopher

This post was edited by AquaEyes on Tue, Sep 3, 13 at 13:56


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RE: It's been a busy Summer in my yard...

  • Posted by AquaEyes 7 New Brunswick, NJ (My Page) on
    Mon, Sep 2, 13 at 15:44

In the back corner, behind the pine tree trunk, is "Darlow's Enigma". To the left of it, behind the railroad tie, is 'Cardinal de Richelieu'. In front of the pine tree trunk and behind the big gray stones is 'Louis Philippe' (the China).

On the right side in the pic you can see a cane of 'Sweet Chariot' pegged down onto the log edging. To its left is 'Blanc de Vibert'. Behind the two of them is 'Pierre Notting'. You can barely see "Bleu Magenta" against the fence, but you can see the white name tag for it. In front of "Bleu Magenta" and looking like a floating green blob against the fence (it defoliated a bit lower down) is 'Golden Celebration' arching toward the camera.

In front of the gray stones and sprawled out is 'Souvenir de Victor Landeau' which is growing as a self-pegging rose -- canes shoot up, then arch out and finally get weighed down almost to the point of lying on the ground. I think it'll work well in that spot. Behind and to the left of it (in front of the corner where the railroad tie meets the gray stone) is 'Souvenir de la Malmaison'. And to the left and in front of 'SLDM' is 'Prospero' still in its pot. Also still in its pot, and cut off on the left edge of the pic in front of the railroad tie, is 'Golden Buddha'.

:-)

~Christopher

This post was edited by AquaEyes on Mon, Sep 2, 13 at 16:58


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RE: It's been a busy Summer in my yard...

  • Posted by AquaEyes 7 New Brunswick, NJ (My Page) on
    Mon, Sep 2, 13 at 15:45

From right to left: behind the railroad ties and just to the right of the exposed cardboard is 'Cardinal de Richelieu'. Against the fence and leaning toward the metal pole is "Sombreuil" the climber. In front of the metal pole (and slightly to the left) is 'Georges Vibert'. And all the way to the left is 'Charles de Mills'.

In front of the Gallica Bed (between the log-edging and the railroad ties) is a row of short-growing repeat bloomers. From left to right, this time, is 'Clotilde Soupert', 'The Prince', 'Golden Buddha' (THANK YOU, Paul Barden, for breeding this beauty!!!), and 'Prospero'. To the right-rear of 'Prospero' is 'Souvenir de la Malmaison'.

:-)

~Christopher

This post was edited by AquaEyes on Mon, Sep 2, 13 at 17:08


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RE: It's been a busy Summer in my yard...

  • Posted by AquaEyes 7 New Brunswick, NJ (My Page) on
    Mon, Sep 2, 13 at 15:46

Behind the railroad ties, in the corner of the fence and the garage, is "Secret Garden Musk Climber" with a make-shift tripod put together from stripped-down tree branches. To its right is 'Charles de Mills'.

In front of the railroad tie, where it meets the garage, is "Sophie's Perpetual" (I needed something thornless for near the window, which is the only way into the garage for the time being). To the right of "Sophie's Perpetual" is 'Clotilde Soupert' still in its pot. Also still in its pot, and to the right of 'Clotilde Soupert', is 'The Prince'.

:-)

~Christopher

This post was edited by AquaEyes on Mon, Sep 2, 13 at 17:22


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RE: It's been a busy Summer in my yard...

  • Posted by AquaEyes 7 New Brunswick, NJ (My Page) on
    Mon, Sep 2, 13 at 15:47

Behind the log-edging are just two roses in this pic -- 'Honorine de Brabant' on the right (with its one main cane arching down and sprouting laterals...this one will likely need a tree-branch tripod for a few years at least), and 'Indigo' on the left (THANK YOU PortlandMysteryRose!!! This was one of your suckers!). I don't think I'm going to put any other roses here.

Oh, and see the pot against the garage door, with a cane reaching the top of the pic? That's the 'Baltimore Belle' I received as a band this year and intended to bring to my friend back on Long Island. Now it's WAY TOO BIG to carry on a train.....so....I'll be renting a car and driving it to him, I suppose. Or maybe I can temporarily wrap the canes around itself and throw a bag over it for a train-ride.....

:-)

~Christopher

This post was edited by AquaEyes on Mon, Sep 2, 13 at 17:29


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RE: It's been a busy Summer in my yard...

  • Posted by AquaEyes 7 New Brunswick, NJ (My Page) on
    Mon, Sep 2, 13 at 15:50

'Orfeo' trained onto the Callery pear trunk...


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RE: It's been a busy Summer in my yard...

  • Posted by AquaEyes 7 New Brunswick, NJ (My Page) on
    Mon, Sep 2, 13 at 15:53

'Georg Arends' (which is thornless -- needed for this spot) is on the left, and 'Nouveau Monde' is in the middle.

:-)

~Christopher


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RE: It's been a busy Summer in my yard...

Christopher,

Thank you so much for sharing the beautiful roses you have chosen. I enjoyed looking at everything. I know it takes time to chronicle and reference roses the way that you have. Your yard will be absolutely gorgeous when you are done. I hope you will share more photos:)

Lynn


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RE: It's been a busy Summer in my yard...

  • Posted by AquaEyes 7 New Brunswick, NJ (My Page) on
    Mon, Sep 2, 13 at 16:34

You're so very welcome! I'm sorry it's hard to see them now (follow the white tags!), but they're still babies -- aside from 'Charles de Mills', 'Cardinal de Richelieu', "Darlow's Enigma" and 'Souvenir de Victor Landeau' (which came as bands April 2012), all these roses came as bands this year -- April and May 2013.

:-)

~Christopher

This post was edited by AquaEyes on Mon, Sep 2, 13 at 16:59


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RE: It's been a busy Summer in my yard...

Christopher, I'm impressed by all the work you've done, and sincerely hope you're going to keep us updated with pictures as your rose garden grows and blooms. I like the fact that you've chosen many interesting roses that we in warmer parts rarely grow, and it's going to be a treat to get to know them better. There's something very exciting about seeing a new garden and then being able to watch its development as time goes on. You must be very proud of what you've accomplished.

Ingrid


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RE: It's been a busy Summer in my yard...

Now this is hands-on information I can use from a true planning professional! Thanks for sharing all of this.
Susan


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RE: It's been a busy Summer in my yard...

I can really relate to the wonderful time you must be experiencing with these plantings. Someday it's going to be such a riot of bloom.


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RE: It's been a busy Summer in my yard...

  • Posted by AquaEyes 7 New Brunswick, NJ (My Page) on
    Mon, Sep 2, 13 at 19:42

lori_elf -- Thanks! It was an interesting solution to two different problems -- what to do with the tree waste, and what to use between the bed and the lawn? I have a lot more branches stowed away on the side of the garage which will either become tripods or will be sawed into small pieces to pile up behind the logs after I get mulch put down.

desertgarden561 -- I felt that the whole process -- from repotting the bands to showing their growth and then garden layout and plant placement -- would be something that could speak more in images than with mere words. And also chronicling the before, the process, and the "finished" garden (if a garden can ever be called "finished") would be great to document if everything works well, being as I'm not an expert by any means. So many things I've been trying and using while putting this garden together have been assembled from books, website references, and forum-member advice -- strung together with my own crazy brain and heavily seasoned with my own ideas. So if later I find someone asking how to do something I've already done, I can not only say what I did -- I can show how and the results. And by posting them on the forum, I also am hoping that if someone sees something I'm doing and has a better idea about something that (s)he'll post about it here.

ingrid_vc -- Many of my rose choices came as a result of Vintage Gardens getting ready for its last year of sales. I already had a huge list of "wants" but I expanded "possibilities" even further as Vintage kept putting out their releases. I have a bunch from them that don't seem to be commonly offered elsewhere, and whenever I had to decide between two similar roses, I tried to go with the less-common of the two. I'm happy with the progress so far, but I have quite a ways to go before I can stand back and say "Ta-da!!!"

poorbutroserich -- Oh, I wouldn't call myself a planning-professional. I'm more of a "gather all possible materials of use, solve individual problems as they arise, and have an intense attention to detail during the entire process" kind of person. I didn't lay out plans on paper. I had a few spots with just one rose in mind for each, but that was a minority. Most of that layout came together over a long period of moving things around, looking up pictures and size estimates over and over on HelpMeFind and anything I found via Google, and lots of walking around and trying to imagine how they'd look in a few years. The shape and size of the bed has grown to what you see as I went along. I did know I'd be doing the cardboard and mulch process to kill the weeds and grass underneath, but once I ran out of my moving boxes I saved, I started to improvise -- collecting boxes put out by stores near my house on recycling night.

:-)

~Christopher


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  • Posted by AquaEyes 7 New Brunswick, NJ (My Page) on
    Mon, Sep 2, 13 at 19:48

mendocino_rose -- You're right! Despite the labor involved, I look forward to going out there every chance I can, if only to check on growth and go on caterpillar hunts. BTW -- does anyone know of some sort of beneficial critter that eats those things?

:-)

~Christopher


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What an adventure! Your hard work is everywhere!! Can`t wait to see it develop into the beautiful rose garden you have designed with your love and patience and hard work. Thanks for sharing these pictures. It`s lovely. Lesley


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This is truly amazing and I'm really impressed!----All your labor and record keeping is to be admired-----

I'm looking forward to watching this grow into a wonderful garden-----I'm really excited to be able to share your progress----Since I can no longer garden the way I used to, it will be a joy to share your excitement
Can't wait for pictures
Florence


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What a wonderland of roses its going to be! How exciting to see it from the beginning. All your effort is going to pay you back x 10! I like your natural tree limb edging as well. My neighbors think I'm nuts sitting and stripping leaves after pruning but leaves are great mulch and I don't want to waste any. The roses eat the faded camellia flowers and the camellias eat the faded rose flowers.


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What a lot of hard work! I made a new bed in my front yard a few weeks ago using a similar method. I planted the roses right in the grass and cut the edges of the bed with an edger. I've been saving up as much cardboard and newspaper as I can find and I'll smother the grass with it when I have enough.
Your yard is going to be magnificent! I also hope you share photos as it matures. All my roses are bands from last fall and this spring so I have a bunch of babies too:)


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  • Posted by AquaEyes 7 New Brunswick, NJ (My Page) on
    Mon, Sep 2, 13 at 23:12

melodyinz8a -- May I make a couple recommendations?

First, I didn't plant into the ground until the grass and weeds underneath were smothered to death -- the pots sat in their spots with cardboard underneath for a few weeks. The safest bet would be to let it sit over the Winter and plant in the Spring, but I noticed that anything that was green and growing became mushy after a month of smothering.

Second, if you're looking for boxes, find out when your local restaurants and shops put their recycling out. Each Monday night on my way home from work I pass more than enough cardboard to do my whole yard, but it didn't occur to me to start grabbing some until I exhausted my own supply of moving boxes.

:-)

~Christopher

This post was edited by AquaEyes on Tue, Sep 3, 13 at 10:29


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Thanks for the tip! I cut big 18-24" holes for the roses and removed the sod directly around them. There are probably weed seeds in the freshly turned dirt though. I'm not sure what I'm going to layer over the cardboard though. My husband doesn't want piles of leaves or grass in the front yard so I may just get a load of bark mulch and hide a layer of organic matter under the bark.


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RE: It's been a busy Summer in my yard...

Amazing and Exciting.

It's like you've begun one of those wonderful stories that were originally told in installments. You had your prologue, which featured some of your new roses in pots in your driveway. And now you've "published" your first chapter. It's already suspenseful and I'm sure I'm not the only one excited to read what happens next.

It's just really neat, Christopher.


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Christopher, thanks for showing us rather than just telling us. I really enjoyed the walk through your garden. I see a lot of hard work, but the payoff will be wonderful. Lou


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RE: It's been a busy Summer in my yard...

You can always hide clippings under a layer of bark or mulch. It looks just the same and you need less bark.


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RE: It's been a busy Summer in my yard...

I am glad you documented your work on this garden.

It is fun to look back and see just how far you and the garden have come. It is also helpful when you show your garden and you see all the wonderful changes and some one else just does not get what you had to start with. Nice to show it was this, then that and now this!


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I just love seeing a beginning garden progress! I would much rather see photos of gardens rather than just the rose photos - can see that on Helpmefind. Almost feel as if I am visiting your garden in person. Love the way you have recycled the limbs for an edging. Please do update when they start to bloom and as they grow. I am working on my rose beds now, and last year did raised beds with daylilies - saw them growing and blooming for the first time this year - some are still blooming. It was a joy to plan, get raised beds built, shovel the soil in myself, plant the lilies then see them all bloom so beautifully this year. Some are still blooming today, unusual for Texas. Now working on rose beds and seeing my bands that are planted start to grow - so much fun! Thanks for sharing - look forward to seeing more of your lovely garden!
Judith


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RE: It's been a busy Summer in my yard...

Thank you everyone for the words of encouragement and the compliments! And please, if anyone sees something that could be a potential problem, or sees something that has a better solution, PLEASE chime in!

And for anyone who is leery of ordering bands for Spring delivery, be aware that all but four roses used in this garden came that way. 'Souvenir de Victor Landeau' (in front of the stones at the pine tree trunk), "Darlow's Enigma" (behind the pine tree trunk), 'Cardinal de Richelieu' (to the left of "Darlow's Enigma") and 'Charles de Mills' (to the left of "Secret Garden Musk Climber", which is in the corner where the garage meets the back fence) were my only roses that came last year. Even 'Orfeo', which has two canes that would reach above my head (I'm 5'11" tall) if allowed to grow straight up, arrived in a 4" band pot in April/May of this year (five months ago). I put them in a nutrient-rich organic potting mix, give them lots of sun and rain, and they took off. Don't be afraid of bands!

:-)

~Christopher


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  • Posted by AquaEyes 7 New Brunswick, NJ (My Page) on
    Fri, Sep 6, 13 at 19:02

I didn't take pics of the front because there really isn't much going on there yet. I didn't want to start spreading cardboard until I get the mulch delivered to cover it. But, there are four roses out there -- 'Souvenir du Dr. Jamain' was planted to climb my front porch railing, and 'Jaune Desprez' was planted to climb the Japanese maple. Then I recently planted 'Eugene de Beauharnais' and 'Marie Pavie' in that tiny bed-to-be, but there's really not much to report on them right now -- 'EdB' is leafing out again after going completely naked, and 'Marie Pavie' is just happily blooming away, disease-free.

'SdDJ' is tied to the railing at just one point right now. You can't see it in the picture, but a new, red, thick cane is shooting from the ground right now.

 photo IMG_0428_zps20fb77db.jpg

'Jaune Desprez' actually lost two 12" laterals in the process of attaching it -- they unfortunately stuck out at odd angles which got in the way of securing the rest of the plant to the tree trunk. I tried bending them to fit, but instead they snapped off. Still, there's a lot of rose there, considering how small the band was when it arrived 4 1/2 months ago. And there are a couple more flower buds forming on it again, but I'm not disbudding or deadheading anything anymore this year. Oh, and that "naked stem" sticking straight up is actually a tree-branch I used to support one of the lower laterals.

 photo IMG_0426_zpsd86e25d3.jpg

The lighting isn't great here, but you can still see the height so far of 'Jaune Desprez', which is secured to the tree with a couple of nails and some twist-ties saved from loaves of bread.

 photo IMG_0427_zpsc5dd45b4.jpg


:-)

~Christopher


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I hate it when new canes snap off!

That happened to me overnight with cl Cecile Brunner, she had some fresh canes sticking out on the street side of the fence so I pulled it gently back on our side, just to have it snap off some time over night and head back out to the street.


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  • Posted by AquaEyes 7 New Brunswick, NJ (My Page) on
    Wed, Sep 18, 13 at 18:54

So last Wednesday morning (on 9/11, ironically), my landlord surprised me with a visit -- and his chainsaw. We spent the day tackling the rest of the tree. Seven hours later, this is what's left of the Callery pear:

The newly-naked Callery pear tree...and for the yard,

And this was what was removed:

The pile of branches left for me...ugh...I'll be busy with this for a while.  <BR>:-/ photo 1186882_10151642179157285_1158718111_n.jpg

Another ominous shot of the pile of branches...but on the bright side, there will be lots of material for snipping, and more logs for edging. photo 1236698_10151642181202285_2079311857_n.jpg

Once again, I went through the branches, using hand-held pruners, to snip it into bits and form a leaf-and-twig mulch layer. I got a little more done on Thursday (my "weekend" is Wed-Thu) before the rain sent me inside, and kept doing a little more every day before going to work.

The pile of branches is shrinking... photo 1240565_10151647973777285_729778883_n.jpg

...as of today... photo 1236979_10151647974852285_1158116611_n.jpg

Any branches too thick to snip were cleaned up as much as possible.

...and there's a new pile of cleaned branches too thick to snip... photo 1236596_10151647977192285_94570438_n.jpg

Thick branches were sawed into more logs for edging.

...with the snipped leaves and twigs spread out as more mulch here... photo 1209227_10151647979267285_600074907_n.jpg

More edging material.
...and some more logs for edging... photo 1237840_10151647981432285_274726722_n.jpg

A couple more days later...
...with a bit more to do tomorrow.  <BR>:-) photo 1236081_10151647983417285_370247158_n.jpg

And finally, today, this is what I've got left.
I'm almost done with the tree debris pile!  <BR>:-) photo 1238806_10151654272872285_1238217978_n.jpg

So now I have enough logs to start stacking them and making a higher edge. It's meticulous work -- sawing by hand to make pieces fit. When I've finally gotten it the way I want, I'll drill screws into the logs to hold them all in place. Oh, and the dark stuff in the bed is the first garbage-can of coffee grounds I picked up from Starbucks, spread out over the layer of leaves and twigs. Eventually, it will all be covered with proper mulch.

More tree limbs meant more logs for edging. The dark stuff spread out in part of the bed is the first pick-up of coffee grounds from Starbucks. photo 563088_10151654275187285_1394925131_n.jpg

I'm not sure yet if I want this part of the bed (against the garage) to be deeper. There's not much "lawn" left.
I'm not sure if I want this part of the bed to be deeper... photo 1238324_10151654276742285_1451291876_n.jpg

I'm liking the log edging.
Once I've finished assembling the log-edging, I'll start drilling screws to hold them in place. photo 1002222_10151654278132285_904636916_n.jpg

The big sprawling rose in the center is 'Souvenir de Victor Landeau' which is growing in a self-pegging habit. 'Souvenir de la Malmaison' is in the left-rear corner of it, with a couple of flowers on it.

'Souvenir de Victor Landeau' is growing into a big and sprawling self-pegging Bourbon. 'Souvenir de la Malmaison' is the one blooming diagonally behind it. photo 1010760_10151654279732285_1723546871_n.jpg

The row of shorter repeat-blooming roses in front of the Gallicas (which are behind the railroad ties).
The row in front of the Gallicas (which are behind the railroad ties) has shorter-growing repeat-blooming roses, with space in-between for future companion perennials. photo 1236006_10151654281677285_2026209823_n.jpg


:-)

~Christopher


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RE: It's been a busy Summer in my yard...

Do you have a map of where you planted everything in case the markers get lost. Big roses tend to swallow up markers. One day the markers are there next to the little roses and then before you know it, the plant has covered it. I have pulled up so many of them while raking up weeds that I made a map of who is growing where ( was that the one from vintage or the one from ARE??). It's good to know that you have the information in a book somewhere.

That was a big pile of branches! I remember all the branches that came down when winds knocked down trees in Pasadena The cut pieces stood like haystacks in front of every house on the street. I wish I had thought to collect some for a border like you did.


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RE: It's been a busy Summer in my yard...

  • Posted by AquaEyes 7 New Brunswick, NJ (My Page) on
    Thu, Sep 19, 13 at 17:02

I don't have a map per se, but I've taken lots of pictures of my progress and uploaded them to my facebook "NJ Garden Pics" album. I identified them in each picture, by name and their relative positions. I also have everything listed on a computer file, organized by class, and with the name of the nursery or person from which/whom I got them. I copied the list onto "My Page" here at GardenWeb, so if you're interested in my inventory, check it out!

So if worse comes to worse, I'll have that for reference. But having obsessed over them for so long, and examined them up-close daily, I can't imagine not knowing them by looking at them. They're planted out in such a way that there aren't any two similar roses (in terms of flowers) planted next to each other. And I don't have any duplicates of anything.

I was out there again today, sawing more logs and raising the edging to what is becoming almost a low retaining wall. I was still wondering what I'd be doing with the branches that are too thin to turn into log-edging, but too thick to snip and add to the leaf-layer.

Then I made a discovery -- I can cut them to about 12" lengths and hammer them into the soil to further secure the log-edging! I came upon the solution when I found two random pieces of rebar about the same length, and hammered them into the soil to hold a log in place that was bordering the paved driveway. Wishing I had more of it lying around, I tried doing the same thing with a branch, and it worked! I realize they'll decay after a couple years, but by then it won't matter. The logs will be held together with screws, and I'll be planting some sempervivum and creeping types of sedum in the spaces in between (I was already filling the spaces with peat moss today in anticipation). As their roots spread through the edging, I think they'll further hold things together. And at least I found a way to further use the tree -- my goal is to not throw any of it away.

:-)

~Christopher


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RE: It's been a busy Summer in my yard...

  • Posted by hoovb z9 Southern CA (My Page) on
    Thu, Sep 19, 13 at 17:26

Great job! From what I've read the Callery Pears snap off in storms, so from a safety perspective you are better off. As the roses mature, your garden will be fabulous. You've spent your summer well.


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RE: It's been a busy Summer in my yard...

  • Posted by AquaEyes 7 New Brunswick, NJ (My Page) on
    Thu, Sep 19, 13 at 17:37

Hoovb, you're right. Before I got started, that tree had branches so long that they dragged on the ground. And the center was ripped out during Irene (before I moved here).

I'm looking forward to Spring already! The roses were the first layer -- the "bones" so-to-speak. Next year is perennials and clematis. I figured that this year will be when the roses go in the ground, and next year they can focus more on growing. The perennials, taking less time to mature, will go in next year and fill-in the following year, and thus won't be able to overwhelm the roses.

I came upon a better solution for the side fence and attaching the climbers. I originally thought of stringing three horizontal lengths of wire there, but decided instead to get a roll of bird-netting and tack that up onto the fence at the posts. It will be a few inches away from the slats of the fence that way. I'll plant clematis between each of the fence-climbing roses, and they'll be able to climb the bird-netting on their own. And the bird-netting is thin and black, so it will be almost invisible against the fence.

Yes, I did get a lot done this Summer!

:-)

~Christopher


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RE: It's been a busy Summer in my yard...

Christopher--thanks for sending me over to this thread. I had enjoyed it before but had forgotten whose project this was. I remember the pear tree in the middle of the back yard in particular--my neighbor has one in the middle of her backyard also and I was surprised to see that she could garden all around it. I still find that strange since my pear tree was rather shallow rooted and easily blew over in a strong wind storm--but it didn't affect her garden or pear tree.

I just love watching gardens develop from scratch. Sometimes wish I could start all over just for the fun of it!

Kate


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RE: It's been a busy Summer in my yard...

I use the bird netting for climbers, ramblers and clematis. Works great and is super cheap!!
I'd much rather spend my money on plants.
Your garden is going to be just lovely. Your documentation reminds me that I need to take more photos of mine.
What impresses me most is your energy! If you could bottle it and send some down here I'd appreciate. I bet it would really make my roses grow!
Thanks again and keep up the good work.
Susan


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RE: It's been a busy Summer in my yard...

  • Posted by AquaEyes 7 New Brunswick, NJ (My Page) on
    Sat, Sep 28, 13 at 15:01

I finally finished clearing up the last of the branches. I sawed them into more logs to add to the edging, but it's nice seeing the yard all cleaned up.
:-)

 photo 1381585_10151672376897285_329385633_n.jpg


The sun moves through the bed in such a way that all the roses get hit with at least the minimum number of hours needed to grow well.

 photo 1013152_10151672377777285_1260850297_n.jpg


I moved the cinder blocks to make an area for overwintering the roses that didn't get planted in the ground. After moving them into this space, I think I'll shorten the length of the "box" and stack them three-high. When the neighborhood leaves drop, I'll be collecting them to fill the spaces between them for added insulation.

 photo 1239744_10151672377782285_911640697_n.jpg


I trimmed more branches from these arbor vitae, and planted all but one of the roses going here. On the far left is 'Rosa moschata' which didn't go in the ground yet because I'm not sure if it will get enough sun. I keep track of when the shadow of the house falls on it, and it seems to be getting full-sun from about an hour after sunrise until about noon. Thereafter, it's in bright-shade. I might just end up moving the white azalea from the front to this spot. But the rest of them, going left to right, are "Sissinghurst Castle", 'Tricolore de Flandre', 'Tuscany Superb', and the musk-seedling 'Reverend Seidel'. In the green wheelbarrow you see the thin pieces of the last of the tree branches. On the ground to the right of the BBQ is the last of the thick pieces, which I'll be adding to the log edging.

 photo 1379592_10151672377787285_277843967_n.jpg


A close-up of a section of the log-edging. Right now, it's fairly secure, but I'll be putting a lot of long screws into the pieces to hold it in place better. And there's lots of nooks and crannies between the pieces. I started pouring peat moss in there, and will eventually stick low-growing sedums and sempervivums into the crevices.

 photo 1377347_10151672377802285_1370958542_n.jpg


It's hard to get good shots with the way the sun and shadows are hitting the yard right now, but here's another shot of the bed.

 photo 1380065_10151672377807285_119598283_n.jpg


Another shot of the yard. Re-seeding the "lawn" will be one of next year's projects.

 photo 1280855_10151672378042285_317767933_n.jpg


Another shot of the bed. I'm going to be throwing down mulch and manure to eventually reach the height of the log-edging, making this a somewhat raised-bed.

 photo 1377607_10151672378047285_2016771528_n.jpg


The bed tapers to a narrow end where the garage and pavement meet the "lawn", and I planted only three roses here. On the far left, with room to spread but contained from taking over, is 'Indigo', which came as one of a few suckers from a garden-forum member. To its right is 'Honorine de Brabant', a dark pink and white striped Bourbon. In the corner on the right (look for the white name tag, since the plant is really small now), is "Sophie's Perpetual". I left room by the window because (for now) it's the only way into the garage -- the door must be opened from the inside. And in the corner by the fence, with a few branches forming a make-shift tripod, is "Secret Garden Musk Climber" which is really the end-cap of the back Gallica bed.

 photo 1378419_10151672378057285_2051061224_n.jpg


The Gallica bed is against the fence and behind the railroad ties. In front of it, and behind the log-edging, is a row of shorter repeat-flowering roses -- to the right of "Sophie's Perpetual" is 'Clotilde Soupert', then 'The Prince', then 'Golden Buddha', then 'Prospero', with 'Souvenir de la Malmaison' in the corner by the stones, and 'Souvenir de Victor Landeau' sprawling out to the right and in front of it.

 photo 1381795_10151672378062285_548452647_n.jpg


If you're interested in going through ALL the pics of the yard, beginning last year before I did anything, I put them all in an album on Photobucket. Right now, it's 277 pics (with descriptions), including a lot of "rose inventory" shots, but it's fun to flip through. Make sure you select "Oldest First" to view, if it doesn't already come up that way.

AquaEyes061976's NJ Garden Pics album on Photobucket


:-)

~Christopher


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RE: It's been a busy Summer in my yard...

Christopher,

You have been busy, busy, busy! I love the edging. What a great way to use your resources. Your yard is going to look beautiful and smell wonderful.

I have a question regarding the rose you have planted close to a tree; it seems as though you will be wrapping the canes around it. Are you concerned about root competition? I ask because I am doing the same thing with a Therese Bugnet that is planted next to a tree minus wrapping the canes. I hope that it can hold its own, or I can provide extra nutrients to the area, and that will be enough for both. I really like T.B. but had no other place to plant it.

Lynn

This post was edited by desertgarden561 on Sat, Sep 28, 13 at 20:35


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RE: It's been a busy Summer in my yard...

I've been following your progress with great interest---You are doing a wonderful job. Looking forward to next spring---I was just in your neck of the woods---we had an appointment at Robert Wood Johnson hospital----I was wondering how close you are to that area----Have you ever seen the HUGE "healing Budda" on Rt. 27 a little north of Kingston N.J.?--it is quite something---
Keep up the gardening you are doing a great job
Florence


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RE: It's been a busy Summer in my yard...

  • Posted by AquaEyes 7 New Brunswick, NJ (My Page) on
    Sun, Sep 29, 13 at 1:03

Desertgarden561 -- it was my understanding that long-established trees have the majority of their feeder roots much further away from the trunk than I where I planted 'Orfeo' to climb it. Digging down, all I saw were barked-over roots. The rose has been in its spot for a couple months now, and has been putting on lots of growth. I realize its still mostly utilizing the potting mix, but I don't think it will be competing much with the tree roots. I plan on putting down mulch and manure every year, feeding the roses individually with granular organic fertilizer every Spring, and using fish/seaweed emulsion in a hose-end sprayer for the whole bed through the rest of the season. I'm hoping that since the food has to trickle down from above, enough will hit the roses before being sopped up by the trees.

Zeffyrose_pa6b7 -- RWJ is right near where I work in New Brunswick, and Stephen Jones frequents the restaurant often (I'm a waiter at a steakhouse...if you're ever in the neighborhood again and ask where "the steakhouse" in town is, you'll end up at my job). Being as I'm not driving right now (I've gotten by without owning a car for five years, but that time is coming to a close soon), I haven't really explored much locally. I'm from Long Island, and used to work in NYC, so I'm used to taking the train to go "have fun" but don't know what's more than walking distance from me. And not being able to just "take a trip to Home Depot anytime I need something" has forced me to be creative with using what I have available in the yard before I go out and buy alternatives.

Thanks for the encouragement, everyone, and I'll keep posting updates, but I'm actually looking forward to a bit of a respite soon when the weather tells me "ok, you're done for now...wait until Spring." The next big step will be (finally) getting a mulch delivery, and spreading that out, and putting up the bird netting trellis along the fence. Of course, I'll be spending Winter making orders of perennials, clematis and seed for Spring delivery.

:-)

~Christopher


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RE: It's been a busy Summer in my yard...

This is looking so good. I hope you feel pleased with it. I had an idea about some low flowers, ferns and bulbs just in front of the log edging and then the lawn starting. Just to keep you busy in case you get bored....


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RE: It's been a busy Summer in my yard...

  • Posted by AquaEyes 7 New Brunswick, NJ (My Page) on
    Sun, Sep 29, 13 at 22:56

Kittymoonbeam -- haha! No, not bored yet, but I want to avoid planting anything between the log edging and the grass. The landlord comes by to "mow" by using a weed-whacker, and I think anything mingling with the grass will get shredded. I am already assembling a list of companion perennials by going through Bluestone Perennials' website, and looking into growing some others (and self-seeding annuals) from seed next Spring. I think there's too much sun for ferns, but I was thinking of sticking some short Sedums, Delosperma and Sempervivums in the nooks and crannies of the log-edging. Other perennials include various Dianthus, Lavandula, Campanula, Geranium, Delphinium, Digitalis, etc. -- basic cottage garden stuff in cool shades. Then I will start thinking about Spring-blooming bulbs.

:-)

~Christopher


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RE: It's been a busy Summer in my yard...

Hi Christopher - I know this thread is a bit old, but it just wanted to say thanks for posting all this info. I've just placed by first order ever for bare-root roses (about 30 plants all up), and I feel a bit less crazy knowing that you did something similar!

How are the roses going now? It must be nearly summer for you?


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RE: It's been a busy Summer in my yard...

  • Posted by AquaEyes 7 New Brunswick, NJ (My Page) on
    Sat, May 10, 14 at 9:41

Thanks!

None of the roses are blooming yet, but there are lots of growing buds. I started another thread (linked below) after I put in some perennials and did a few other things. I'll take pictures again when the roses start blooming.

:-)

~Christopher

Here is a link that might be useful: Things are greening up!


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