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Sacrilege, Planting an own root Belinda's Dream Today

Posted by desertgarden561 9/SZ11 -Las Vegas, N (My Page) on
Sun, Dec 22, 13 at 9:46

I am going to plant a Belinda's Dream own root today, mulch well, and cross my fingers. It has been here thriving for 5 months potted, and sitting on a cart in my backyard, but isn't looking so healthy now.

All of the roses received as bands and planted one week later, or those that were potted up and grown for 3-4 months prior to planting are thriving.

My temperatures as far as predicted (10 days) will be around 58-62 for the highs and 38-40 for the lows. January is our cold month with highs in the upper 40's to low 50's, and the lows are about the same as now to the low 30's on average.

Has anyone else tried this sacrilegious planting practice, and what was the outcome?

Lynn


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Sacrilege, Planting an own root Belinda's Dream Today

Fall is our normal planting time here, so it doesn't sound strange to me at all. I would just make sure that it gets water, and is protected from any high winds.

Jackie


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RE: Sacrilege, Planting an own root Belinda's Dream Today

I have had great success planting at this time of year. One of my past Pickering orders arrived in December and every one of those roses took off. R. primula is an example. It was delivered in 2011 and now towers above my head. Bloom this year was spectacular, with hundreds of flowers dotted up and down every cane.

Btw, my local botanic garden actually recommends fall/winter as the best time of year to plant in our area. This is because it allows California native plants, especially drought tolerant ones, to receive water in the cold season, when they are most adapted to get it. Plus have time to develop a strong root system before hot weather sets in when they do not like to be watered. It makes some sense for roses too. Even though most roses appreciate water in the blast of summer heat, that isn't when they are doing the majority of growth, and if they don't have fairly good roots by that time, they will be subject to more stress.

Melissa


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RE: Sacrilege, Planting an own root Belinda's Dream Today

  • Posted by seil z6b MI (My Page) on
    Sun, Dec 22, 13 at 13:58

Those temps sound pretty mild and I don't think the rose will have any problems at all. It may even do better once in the ground!


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RE: Sacrilege, Planting an own root Belinda's Dream Today

Melissa, I totally agree with you regarding planting during the Fall so that roots are more likely to develop in time to handle the summer months. We plant grafted roses here from now through President's Day, but there is no local readily available advice regarding own-root roses, which in earnest, are new to me. Thank you and all for responding. Your input is reassuring.

Lynn

This post was edited by desertgarden561 on Sun, Dec 22, 13 at 19:42


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RE: Sacrilege, Planting an own root Belinda's Dream Today

Lynn, I try to plant own-root bands in the fall for the above-stated reasons and my temperature range in the winter is fairly similar to yours. I water and mulch the new roses well and they've always seemed to do fine. The roses that don't do nearly as well are the ones planted in late spring or when the weather warms up unusually early in the spring. The best time to plant is any time after the cool weather sets in during autumn to just before it's coldest, usually late January. I think you're planting at just the right time. If you lived in Minnesota then of course I'd have to try to dissuade you!

Ingrid


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RE: Sacrilege, Planting an own root Belinda's Dream Today

You live in the desert. I wouldn't worry.
Belinda's dream is always blooming for me.


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RE: Sacrilege, Planting an own root Belinda's Dream Today

Fall planting is not considered uncommon where I live. In fact as long as planting time is reasonably far from the frost period (if any) fall is considered the best period for planting. That would be late October until late December over here. I find that one of the main advantages is that there is less of a requirement to water regularly since this period coincides with the wet period in a Med type climate and in any case evaporation is much less of an issue. On top of that plants have the oppurtunity to grow their root systems unrestricted from a watering regime which tends to make them concentrate their roots to a limited watering spot. For bare root roses already in their dormancy, planting a little later than that (when there is less danger for the plant to immediately start sprouting) would be recommended.
Nik


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RE: Sacrilege, Planting an own root Belinda's Dream Today

Mauvegirl8,

May I ask, how old is your Belinda's dream, what size was it when you purchased it and how large is it now?

I purchased mine as a band this summer, it was growing in a 2 gallon pot, but now is in the ground. It has been planted in a focal point and has an important job to do in that bed. I am trying to get a "general idea" regarding the growth rate for it.

Lynn


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RE: Sacrilege, Planting an own root Belinda's Dream Today

Lynn, I received my Belinda's Dream late in 2010 from Heirloom as a band and it very quickly began to grow to a respectable size. The last winter with very little rain has set it back somewhat but it's around 4 1/2 feet tall by 4 feet wide. The flowers are larger than most old roses and quite fragrant and beautiful. In retrospect I should have mulched it much more deeply and fertilized it more frequently, in which case I'm sure it would be taller and flower more at present.

Ingrid


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RE: Sacrilege, Planting an own root Belinda's Dream Today

Ingrid, that is a respectable size for a rose that is not fully mature. Thank you for the information. I will be fretting less when it reaches 2 x 2, as it is the focal point shrub in a planting bed that is about 9 x 25 or so; in the front yard... There is also a 1 gallon white rose that is about the same size in this planting space. This area is rather sad looking, but I am awaiting the delivery of two roses next month, two in the spring, and the availability of perennials to plant. My neighbors who have not seen the back and side yard changes must be wondering what on earth I am doing....


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RE: Sacrilege, Planting an own root Belinda's Dream Today

Belinda's Dream is a focal point in any garden. She effortlessly commands attention (even among antique or old garden roses.). I have 3 from Antique Rose Emporium. They do not sell bands. Belinda has been in my garden less than 2 years. This rose demands space, many basal canes.
I enjoy deadheading = almost always in bloom. Milkshake pink, has dimension, not flat. Robust blooms, not delicate...


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RE: Sacrilege, Planting an own root Belinda's Dream Today

I have 10 feet in front of my porch and was hoping to grow a Lavender plant which will take up 12-18" and 2 Belinda's Dream roses. Would 8ft be enough room for 2 Belind's Dream roses? How much space do they need between each other? Thanks


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RE: Sacrilege, Planting an own root Belinda's Dream Today

My Belinda's Dream has been in for four or five years. Give her LOTS of room! Love this rose, one of the few that will rebloom during our heat.


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RE: Sacrilege, Planting an own root Belinda's Dream Today

Big, beautiful rose, OG Rose! Belinda's Dream does seem to be a great performer in your area. When my sister in Dallas completes her back garden prep, I'll put BD on the plant list. How's BD's disease resistance for everyone in the DFW (or vicinity/similar climate) area? Carol


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RE: Sacrilege, Planting an own root Belinda's Dream Today

She stays healthy here -SW of Houston.


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RE: Sacrilege, Planting an own root Belinda's Dream Today

Thanks, Porkpal!


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