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help with beans, okra, peas, and corn

Posted by kawaiineko_gardener 5a (jesusbeloved29@yahoo.com) on
Fri, Jan 4, 13 at 19:47

I know it's not recommended to grow beans and okra as transplants as they don't like having their roots disturbed.

The main growing season where I am at (Northern MI) starts May 28th; our growing season is short and cold.

If I try to start okra at the beginning of the main season here, the seeds tend to rot in the soil due to it being too cool; I grow my veggies in containers and still have this problem with direct sowing okra.

Even if I were to do a later planting (i.e. mid June) June is still a cool month here.

For peas, it's the same problem with okra; the seeds rot in the soil cause of it being too cold.

Also with peas and beans it would just make it easier for spacing and figuring out how many plants per container doing transplants as opposed to direct sowing.

How old should the okra, beans, and peas be as transplants before transplanting them to the garden? What size pots should be used (for starting them as transplants)?


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: help with beans, okra, peas, and corn

I live in the mountains outside of Colorado Springs, and my growing season is short, too. I had someone recommend starting beans in toilet paper tubes inside a few weeks ahead of time and then just planting the whole tube without disturbing the roots. He said it worked for him, so I thought I would try it this year, have been saving those tubes for awhile. He didn't mention peas, and I don't even try okra here, but I bet it would work for corn as well.


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RE: help with beans, okra, peas, and corn

Beans and corn will all transplant fine. Those of us in cool climates do it all the time. I just sow in modules. Peat pots have a very poor reputation and are a waste of money imo. I use the same modules year after year. I direct sow peas because they germinate at lower temps than corn and beans. Okra is impossible here.


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RE: help with beans, okra, peas, and corn

Don't give up on peas. You may have to try a different brand. They will sprout in cold soil. Plant them only an inch deep in well drained, moist soil. If they rot, then the soil is too wet.

Okra is a southern crop. Try things that grow up north for more gratification! lol

Planting in paper tubes sounds good but beware of all the processing chemicals in paper manufacturing...more than 20...which you will end up eating.


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RE: help with beans, okra, peas, and corn

Peat pots is what I was thinking of using because it just lessens the possibility of transplant shock. I don't plant the seedlings, 'pot and all' like it's recommended to do with peat pots. I just peel away the peat pot once the root system is firm enough that I can lift the seedling from the pot without the soil crumbling.

I don't know of anything else that would work similar to a peat pot and make a good substitute. Do you have any suggestions regarding this? Also I don't know what plant modules are, but they're not available here, at least not my knowledge.

What size pots (for doing transplants, peat or otherwise) would be an adequate size with depth and the diameter of the starter pots (3", 4", etc.) for beans, okra, corn and peas?


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RE: help with beans, okra, peas, and corn

"Modules" are just the black or brown plastic 6 pack or 4 packs also called cell packs like you buy plants in from any nursery. They are readily available anywhere seed starting supplies are sold - even Walmart.

Peat pots is what I was thinking of using because it just lessens the possibility of transplant shock.

The company claims that but there is no proof of it. And since you have to tear the pots off anyway the odds of it being true are slim.

Size of container used - whatever type - varies from vegetable to vegetable. And most have to be transplanted at least once anyway to a larger container - which is one reason why most germinate their seeds in the small plastic cell packs and then transplant them to larger containers after germination.

Beans, corn, okra, and peas wouldn't all be started or transplanted at the same time anyway so you might as well use plastic that can be re-used. And they all germinate and grow so fast that they will quickly outgrow any germinating container which means they would have to be transplanted at least 2x.

Which is why direct seeding them is the best way to go.

Dave


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RE: help with beans, okra, peas, and corn

I transplanted corn last season and it worked great. I started it inside in modules and moved it out after it was safe. No problems with just handling it carefully. Didn't lose a single start.


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RE: help with beans, okra, peas, and corn

How old should corn and okra seedlings be if you're starting them as transplants and/or how many true leaves should they have.

I have heard that with other veggies you start them in small starter pots/flats and then repot them to larger starter pots.
I am going to assume that with okra, beans, and corn, you wouldn't do this since they are finicky with being transplanted to begin with correct?

So I am going to assume that whatever since starter pot you use, is the one you would transplant it in? What size would you recommend with the depth and rim of the diameter (3", 4" etc.)

People have recommended to not use peat pots, but what about cow pots (the kind that are made with compost as well as peat)


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RE: help with beans, okra, peas, and corn

Five years ago I reported on my invention of pipe pots for growing large transplants without root disturbance. I've used them for many types of vegies and flowers, including okra. Below is a link to one on growing corn transplants.

Here is a link that might be useful: Starting corn


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