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peat pots

Posted by fatal_fatalii (My Page) on
Tue, Feb 9, 10 at 3:28

I recently bought some peat pots but they did not have any pre drilled holes in them. This confused me as pots that I have bought in the past had the hole where you can just punch them out, but these did not.

Am I supposed to leave them as is to avoid the porus containers from drying out too quickly?


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: peat pots

I think they should have a hole in the bottom. I know they will eventually drain right through once they are wet enough but I used to put a hole in the bottom. I stopped using peat pots several years ago because I found they dried out quicker or had mold quicker so I swithched to plastic and don't have half the problems I had before. Stan


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RE: peat pots

Peat pots are a PITB and should be avoided - tons of discussions all over the forums on their problems - but yeah, if you want to use them at least punch a hole in them. And if you use them be sure to strip them off before planting in the garden.

Dave


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RE: peat pots

...and make sure that if they are not in a dome greenhouse or something that traps humidity that you water them often. =)


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RE: peat pots

I don't understand the PITB issue? I use the 50 plant "Jiffy" seed starting greenhouse with the plastic covers. I have used them for several years with no problems. What problems or issues are to be expected with these and what are the other options for seed starting?


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RE: peat pots

grow: IMO, there's a very big difference between peat pots in an open area and peat pellets in one of the Jiffy greenhouses. I use those & they work excellent for seed starting.


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RE: peat pots

I don't understand the PITB issue? I use the 50 plant "Jiffy" seed starting greenhouse with the plastic covers. I have used them for several years with no problems. What problems or issues are to be expected with these and what are the other options for seed starting?

As I mentioned above there are literally hundreds of discussions all over the forums on the problems associated with both peat pots and peat pellets. A simple forum search using those terms will pull up those discussions if anyone is interested in reviewing them.

Dave


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RE: peat pots

Dave, no disrespect here but, you stated that peat pots are a PITB. I simply ask why, and what other options there are. I don't care to search every post on peat pots, but if there is a reason that I should not use them for seed starting then I would like to know.


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RE: peat pots

Grow:

In my experience peat pots are very hard to control water in; they are always too dry and then too wet because they retain so much water and don't drain easily. Once they are watered they become impossible to move around because they are so flimsy. I am not a big fan of putting them in my garden because they do not decompose in one year and I can't stand seeing chunks of it in my beds. Also, they are not reuseable so plastic is they way I go.

I do use peat pellets for some of my 'picky' seedlings that do not like their roots disturbed. I end up putting the whole peat pellet then in a plastic container for transplant (minus the netting). It is harder to control their water over my plastic divided trays but I can baby the couple I have.

I hope that helps.

Keriann~


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RE: peat pots

  • Posted by dicot Los Angeles (My Page) on
    Wed, Feb 10, 10 at 18:11

1)Non-renewable resource
2)Moisture control extremely difficult
3)More expensive than newspaper pots or other alternatives
4)Tough for bacteria to breakdown in soil (if planted w/seedling)


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RE: peat pots

Growanything - you don't have to search all the posts, only read through a few of them as you would find very few, if any, positive discussions of either the pots or the pellets. ;)

Might I suggest:

Peat pots ARRRGGHHH!!!

But sure, we can rehash it again. As the others have said peat pots are noted for leaching moisture from the soil so the pot is wet while the soil dries out, root compaction, drying out far too quickly, prone to molds and mildews, poor drainage, do NOT decompose as they claim instead they turn green and rot, and stunted plant growth. There are plenty of alternatives available, plastic containers of any kind being the most commonly used.

Peat pellets are too difficult to moisten properly, too acidic for good germination, once they are wet they suck up too much water leading to rotted seeds and poor germination, stunted plant growth, too compacted soil for good root development, and the netting never never ever ever goes away and the plants get root bound. Pictures have been posted here of dead plants pulled up from the garden where the roots never got out of the netting - thus the standard recommendation that if you do use them you must remove the netting prior to planting.

Again there are a number of other options over using them. Plastic containers of all kinds, plug flats, cell packs, foam cups, not to mention the many different germination set-ups offered by many of the different seed companies - all filled with a good seed starting mix. Check out the FAQS here for all kinds of info on alternatives.

Bottom line - it is your choice but most experience seed growers won't use either - unless desperate. ;)

Dave


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RE: peat pots

I got a number of the peat pots last year & ended up xferring everything that was in peat pots to plastic cups...for all of the reasons mentioned above.
I am done with the peat pots!


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RE: peat pots

I am just talking about seed starting here. Not re-potting or anything else. Is that the consensus that it is not best to start seeds in peat containers? These are what I am talking about...
Photobucket


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RE: peat pots

I still feel I must defend the peat pellets (not the pots). I use them every year for all kinds of different veggies & have no issues with them at all. I always get a 90% or better germination rate. I only use them in the little greenhouse deals with a dome/cover. Once the seedlings have been straightened up for a few days & cotyledons are growing well, I transplant from the greenhouse usually to a cup of some sorts, removing the netting (very easy to do) and the plants still grow fine afterwards. In fact, this year, most plants on suffered about a day or two, if even that, of transplant shock before they started taking off growing again. IMO, if peat pellets are used in the right environment, only for seed starting & a few basic rules are followed, they can be excellent! =)

- Steve


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RE: peat pots

I am just talking about seed starting here. Not re-potting or anything else. Is that the consensus that it is not best to start seeds in peat containers? These are what I am talking about...

Yes, those are what we are talking about. Yes, that is the consensus. Yes, the consensus is they should not be used for seed starting. Nor per the consensus, should they be used for anything else either.

Sorry, but if you don't want to read through any of the many discussions on them where all the details are given then I can't say it any plainer than that.

Dave


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RE: peat pots

Why do they sell 'extra-tall domes' when plastci domes should be removed once the seeds sprout?

Millions of people buy millions of useless products.

Peat pots are useless for growing/starting seeds in or transplanting into later. Save some $ and time and use a plastic container(s), nothing fancy about that.

I am not really sure what other information you need. Many of us have given you words of advice... it is just advice.. don't stress gardening should be fun...use whatever you want, we just know to stay away from peat pots.

Keriann~


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RE: peat pots

This post actually scared me enough to return my peat pot cells. lol. This is my first year and the last thing I need is to deal with water issues and mold. I do believe I've been to HD, Lowes and Menards a million times!

And yeah, I was one of those dopes who bought the extra tall domes for the greenhouses. Clear plastic wrap or a garbage bag would work just fine. Oh well, only lost a buck.

Kim


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RE: peat pots

Heirloom- the domes are great; you don't have to worry that the saran wrap will sag and lay on top of the soil, or get crumpled and stuck to itself, etc. Just that the regular size domes are really all that's necessary since you'd take the dome off well before the seedlings hit the top of it. So you made a good investment! :)


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RE: peat pots

Well one came with the setup I bought. So I bought the extra tall one for vanity I suppose. haha.


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RE: peat pots

I have used both and had success with both of them. I also use the last years plastic pots that family buy their flowers and vegetables in. Last year I tried a "new" option and will use it again this year. I cut toilet paper rolls in half and fill those up with potting soil in the flats. They worked for me and was a cheap alternative being laid off.


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RE: peat pots

When you use peat pots to start seeds, here's what usually follows:

1) You plant the pots with your seedlings directly into the soil. The roots have a hard time getting through the dense walls, even when wet. If the roots can't expand fast enough (and they can't), the plant can't grow and either does poorly or just dies. The peat collar standing up in the air also wicks needed water from the plants.

2) You remove the seedlings from the peat pots before planting. The seedling root tips have grown into the peat walls, so you have to rip them loose to discard the pot and that is often just enough abuse to kill the seedlings or stunt their growth.

But you can use them and learn the hard way, too.

Sue


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RE: peat pots

Digging up an old thread here. I was thinking of using the jiffy peat pots, but after reading all this info I think I'll find an alternative. I was thinking of doing something like joberry and repurposing my toilet paper rolls, I've been saving them anyways for this purpose, but has anyone actually tried it? How did it work out? I am looking into getting some plastic pots now. Also I was thinking of using a soil brick from greenhouse mega store, it says it is a mixture of coir and peat, has anyone used this and had luck with it?


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RE: peat pots

I'd also be interested in any replies you get Nico girl, just starting veg last year, and curious from my reading about using loo rolls, newspaper pots or fibre/peat pots. All of which have been given to me over past few months. Esp wondering if planting any or all of these into ground avoids transplant shock? Eg if peat pots are ripped?


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RE: peat pots

This is the second year I've tried strictly peat pots and I've had so many issues with my seedlings thinking the issues were something else. I came across this post and realized I've seen all of the problems described above.
I used to use plastic pots and thought I remembered not having to baby seedlings as much as I have been lately. It's good to know I haven't lost my touch! I am currently in the process of moving everything to plastic and will hopefully save the youngsters!


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