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Growing Raspberry From Seed

Posted by Greenhorn2 6 (My Page) on
Sat, Sep 7, 13 at 10:00

Hi...i'm wondering if there are any Professionals here that grow plants for a living I.E., Botany , Horticulturist or maybe you have a nursery and sell plants etc.

I have some rare Raspberry seeds from the " Fengmenhong" Jilin Giant Red Raspberry from China that i wish to grow in my backyard and so far i've been unlucky in starting a plant from seed as they are very difficult Raspberries to start from seed and these seeds are the only plant material i can get for this species, so maybe someone is interested in a project to help propagate this Rare Giant Chinese Everbearing Raspberry in which it may help someone else as well as me i'm sure the result will be worth it from what i have researched.

thanx


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Growing Raspberry From Seed

Hi Greenhorn,

Raspberry seeds don't like to be dried and stored. Also, there are a few embryonic "keys" you have to unlock. Lot's of people have different favorite ways of doing this. I would do it this way. Pick ripe fruit and freeze it for 2 months. Thaw and let it overipen to the point of fermentation. Place the fruit in a wire mesh strainer, and separate the seed from the pulp. Place the seeds immediately into a cup of water that is 100F or so and soak for an hour. Place seeds in sterile soil and keep moist, maintaining a soil temp of 75F to 85F until you see signs of sprouting. Then, you can back off to 65F to 75F Here is a scholarly link on it (good luck with trying to scarify a raspberry seed!). You could also soak them in various acid solutions at point of planting. It's all in the article in the link below.
Susan

Here is a link that might be useful: Drying interferes with germ of Rubus species


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RE: Growing Raspberry From Seed

Hi Greenhorn,

Raspberry seeds don't like to be dried and stored. Also, there are a few embryonic "keys" you have to unlock. Lot's of people have different favorite ways of doing this. I would do it this way. Pick ripe fruit and freeze it for 2 months. Thaw and let it overipen to the point of fermentation. Place the fruit in a wire mesh strainer, and separate the seed from the pulp. Place the seeds immediately into a cup of water that is 100F or so and soak for an hour. Place seeds in sterile soil and keep moist, maintaining a soil temp of 75F to 85F until you see signs of sprouting. Then, you can back off to 65F to 75F Here is a scholarly link on it (good luck with trying to scarify a raspberry seed!). You could also soak them in various acid solutions at point of planting. It's all in the article in the link below.
Susan

Here is a link that might be useful: Drying interferes with germ of Rubus species


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RE: Growing Raspberry From Seed

I've never heard the dry thing before. I'm no pro, but I've grown dozens of raspberry plants from seeds in the past from store bought fruit. You won't get the same thing, often times they're just sweet and no tart.

I usually pick a few berries and leave them somewhere warm for a day or two, then run them with my finger using a fine steel sieve and wash them thoroughly and allow them to dry in folded paper towels. When I'm ready I wet and wring out a paper towel or two, place the dried pods which have been ziplocked for a few months, onto one side then fold over the other side. I stick them in a baggy and put them on the condiment shelf in the fridge for about a month, then plant them. I've gotten about an 85% germination rate doing this. Raspberries are invasive, much like mint, so you'll need to check them out often as they mature. I planted and grew a little over 15 plants when I was 10, I'm 24 now and my folks' house's backyard now has about 60 different berry plants all throughout. They're regularly pruned now though, so they don't take up much space.

You could also do as nature intended, just throw a few berries into a pot or the ground where the soil is nice and rich, let it rot in the soil and come some time later, you'll have plants growing.

Depending on soil conditions and regional weather, you may have to wait more than a few years or more for fruit. If you're in California, fruit from seed usually results in faster mature times for trees. In the nearly 30 years my parents have owned that house, they've never had any luck with grafted trees. So they just did it like in the old country, they just planted what they bought at the store. Of the apple seeds, only two trees resulted in tart little apples, the rest of them are some type of cultivar, whether they're discovered or not is a mystery to me. One tree in particular sets crimson red apples the size of a fist with a buttery yellow, pink tinged flesh. The others are some type of gala and golden delicious variety, but not exactly those.

Those all fruited in 3-5 years.


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