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pH level for Raspberry Tart Viburnum?

Posted by plantingman 6b (SC KS climate) (My Page) on
Wed, Jan 30, 13 at 14:19

Does anyone know what pH range Raspberry Tart Viburnums need in order to thrive and produce lots of berries? My soil is neutral to slightly acidic at about 6.3 - 6.5 pH.


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: pH level for Raspberry Tart Viburnum?

That pH level is desirable for the greatest range of plants - you should be fine. To get good berry production, you need to plant another variety for cross pollination. I'd suggest 'Blue Muffin' or any other arrowwood (V. dentatum)


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RE: pH level for Raspberry Tart Viburnum?

i think of V as 'run them over with the truck' plants..

may i suggest you are way over-thinking it all if you are worried about pH ...

and i doubt highly.. that pH has a big impact on berry production ... water , light and soil being much more important.. with your rather benign soil pH ...

as gal suggested ... i would remove pH concerns from your worries about just about anything.. short of the ultimate pH hounds.. like blueberry or something. ...

ken


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RE: pH level for Raspberry Tart Viburnum?

I didn't realize pH levels were so overrated. Why do extension offices suggest homeowners have their soil tested before planting trees and shrubs? Is it just a way for those offices to make money, kind of like an auto mechanic telling you that you need new brakes when you really don't?


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RE: pH level for Raspberry Tart Viburnum?

A soil test tells more than pH. The pH portion of the test will help in dealing with most plants, to a degree, but it is most helpful when dealing with extremes...either extremes in your soil's pH or if you want to plant something that prefers an extreme (like blueberries).

tj


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RE: pH level for Raspberry Tart Viburnum?

one doenst amend mother earth.. before knowing what to do ...

of what benefit to her .. or to you.. had you just went out there willy nilly.. and just started throwing amendments around.. eh????

now that you know you are mid range-fine.. just forget about it ...

BTW.. most ext office.. are pretty familiar with their county.. and can tell you off hand.. if the test need be done ... they usually have a pretty good grip on the area ...

and do keep in mind.. there business is agriculture.. more than the backyard gardener ... if .. like many in lenawee county MI ... if you are growing 1000 acres of soybean ... you better have a pretty good grip on your soil .. if you want to make a profit ... the science of soil management.. isnt really tied up in viburnum .. lol .. for most of us.. its a curiosity.. rather than a requisite ... unless.. as i said.. you are really out there in plant selection ...

ken

ps: throwing stuff around the yard.. willy nilly is.. frankly.. pollution of mother earth.. it is kind of within the definition of such.. if she doesnt need it ... i was once told at MGardener class.. that per square foot of garden.. homeowners are the #1 polluters on the face of the earth ... whether i believe that or not.. is one thing.. but i can believe it.. on the common suburban lawn.. weed killers.. bug killers.. pH adjustors.. flying bug sprays.. i mean really.. dig a hole.. plant the darn thing.. and water it.. and 99% of the time.. they thrive.. especially if you grow weeds.. lol ... may i step off the soapbox now?????


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RE: pH level for Raspberry Tart Viburnum?

Yes, please get off your soapbox. :-) lol But thanks for the information I really do appreciate it. I wonder how many times I've wasted my money on buying Miracle Grow Garden Soil to "ammend" the soil already there when I didn't really need to? lol


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RE: pH level for Raspberry Tart Viburnum?

pH. Unless you are in an extreme zone with pH at the edge of the scale for plants, it IS way overrated. I have planted 100s of trees and shrubs ranging from Hellebores, Forsythias, Philadelphus on the sweet side, to Magnolia, Picea, and High Bush Blueberries on the acidic side. All have succeeded without soil amendments. The soil here is generally acidic, but not to the point of ridiculousness, and that is the case most places in this country I suspect.

One reason County Agents ask about pH is to remove any doubt. I bet just about all the people who get their soil tested are told it is withing the normal range. Just like your doctor might ask for a blood sugar test to eliminate questions he might have, I suspect most of those people are told their level is within the normal range.

So I have to agree that if you have a range of plants, different genera, different species, growing naturally in the area, you probably can grow just about any plant bought in a commercial nursery. And I know, things like Pin Oaks in calcareous soils are one example of non-compatibility. In my mind, it proves the exception rather than the rule, because most Oaks are not that fussy.


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