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Quick Burning Bush question

Posted by ilovemytrees 6a Western NY (My Page) on
Tue, Oct 30, 12 at 18:30

If planted in an ideal spot, and well taken care of, does Euonymus Alatus Compactus usually grow 4-6 ft or 6-8 ft? I've read both heights on different web sites.

In this case, size definitely matters to me. I want a BB that'll be 6ft tall.

It will have gorgeous full, all day sun, and plenty of water by your's truly. lol

Thanks!


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Quick Burning Bush question

6-8'

It's not nearly as 'compact' as advertised.


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RE: Quick Burning Bush question

It depends on conditions and the given time period. In some conditions you might be lucky to get 6' (height) at maturity, while in others, it may easily reach 8' high and 10' wide. Plants don't just grow magically to a height we write down on their tag and then stop.

Unfortunately, you have also chosen a plant that is known to do serious environmental damage in your area. What a shame that you didn't check your state's invasive plant list!


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RE: Quick Burning Bush question

Oh, and I forgot to say, often the size shown on nursery tags are not meant to be ultimate size, but represent an "average" size at "maturity". The definition of maturity (at least in this case) can vary quite a bit depending on who you talk to. Occasionally, the size will be listed something like, "grows 6 to 8 feet in 5 years".


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RE: Quick Burning Bush question

Yes, do check invasive nature for your area. This is quite the environmental pest in numerous northeastern US areas including New York.


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RE: Quick Burning Bush question

dad's neighbor had one.. between the houses.. we got tired of it at 15 feet tall ... cut a 6 inch trunk to 3 inches.. and within a year.. it was back to 4 to 6 feet ..

its all about the number of years ...

we generally say.. size ESTIMATES are at 10 years.. in this case.. much quicker.. for sure ...

did we not already discuss the invasiveness of this plant???

at the link.. i dont see many within the size you suggest .. and i have no clue.. what COMPACTA adds to your name.. versus the plain old, plain old ...

frankly.. i swear i have told you this before.. NOTHING.. stops growing at some magical height.. as with most shrubs.. its a matter of renovation pruning.. on a 3 year cycle.. should you wish to maintain a shrub at some given size ...

there really are NOT special rules for different shrubs .. this is the same for your forsythia.. weigalia .. viburnum .. etc ... and its no different if this is some supposed dwarf ... [if plain old grows one foot per year .. then a dwarf of her grows less per year.. say 6 inches.. but again.. they dont magically stop growing at some predetermined height.. its all about how fast they get to a given height.. and then surpass it] ..

hubby reinstalling his 2 x 2 this weekend??? .. now that he has counted all his roman coins.. lol ...

ken

Here is a link that might be useful: link


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RE: Quick Burning Bush question

  • Posted by bboy USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA (My Page) on
    Wed, Oct 31, 12 at 10:07

The 15 footer might have been E. alatus rather than E. alatus 'Compactus'.

You can cut one to near the ground every so often and have it recover pretty quickly, as mentioned. This keeps the height below a certain point while maintaining an attractive natural shape, unlike cutting it back part way which is pretty much impossible to do in an appealing fashion, due to how this shrub branches.

But if the species is a noxious weed in your area that should be the dominant consideration.


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RE: Quick Burning Bush question

Hi everyone.

Ken, he never took down the 2x2's. He only took down the burlap. He is walking out the door right now with the staple gun to put it back up.

I am very uncomfortable with all of these labeling of invasive shrubs/trees, you name it. We all share DNA with shrubs and trees, after all, we all came from a giant star that went kaboom. I am not opposed to immigration, whether it be from people or of shrubs and trees. Just as people need to learn how to get along with each other, so do plants and trees need to learn to coexist. It seems wrong to separate living things based on where they originally came from.

Brandon, your knowledge is vast and I respect it a great deal. Your contribution to this board cannot be overstated. All I ask is you please not use condescending phrases like "what a shame". I already knew about the Burning Bush being on the s**t list, and yes, I still want one.

They are ALL around here in my area. Every time I drive by and see them I yearn for one (a few) in my yard. I can't help it. I love them.

I do my part for the environment by not burning my trash, not buying water in plastic bottles, biking to the local park instead of using the car, recycling, not owning a gas guzzling car, turning the lights off when not in use, not smoking, and dh has a scooter he often uses to take to work instead of our vehicle. Plus I am planting a ton of trees and shrubs on my little corner of the world.

So if planting this burning bush shrub makes me a wanton woman, then I am truly a very happy one.


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RE: Quick Burning Bush question

"Just as people need to learn how to get along with each other, so do plants and trees need to learn to coexist."

Unfortunately, it just doesn't work that way. Invasives displace, and often lead to the extinction of, native flora and fauna. Like saying that the environment should just learn to cope with toxic sludge spilled from factories, ignoring the damage done by invasives doesn't make the problem go away.

The argument that there are already plenty in your area and that just one more won't hurt may have some merit, but that's still kind of like saying that throwing just one more soda can out of your car window is no big deal on an already heavily littered roadway. The argument is technically correct, but may break down in the big picture (when everyone uses the same rationalization to add just one more).

In reality, I won't loose one second of sleep over your choice to plant the burning bush, but I do think there are much better alternatives that you could have chosen. I still see it as a shame that you didn't find something more interesting and better for your ecosystem.


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RE: Quick Burning Bush question

How about the native Euonymus americanus? To me, it's more visually interesting than burning bush. I love planting obscure natives and stumping friends with these "odd" plants. For me, natives are the new exotics!


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RE: Quick Burning Bush question

  • Posted by bboy USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA (My Page) on
    Fri, Nov 2, 12 at 2:22

Horticultural staples like burning bush are prevalent because they look good to a lot of people and are easy to grow, kinds that are not prevalent often do not look so good to so many people and are not so easy to grow. So it is not an even trade.

The problem with specific kinds like burning bush is that they are too easy to grow, in eastern North America. Large commercial growers need to stop promoting and promulgating this and other weeds like Norway maple and Japanese barberry.


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RE: Quick Burning Bush question

"Horticultural staples like burning bush are prevalent because they look good to a lot of people and are easy to grow, kinds that are not prevalent often do not look so good to so many people and are not so easy to grow."

The ease of growth part of that statement has some merit, but the aesthetics part just doesn't hold true. Many commonly grown plants are not the best looking of their visual type. On top of that, why would you want to grow what everyone else grows...how boring!


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RE: Quick Burning Bush question

  • Posted by bboy USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA (My Page) on
    Fri, Nov 2, 12 at 21:59

A lot of people is not the same as everyone.


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RE: Quick Burning Bush question

Update:

Ive changed my mind on the Burning Bush. I'm going to order Witch Hazel instead, in the early spring. I've done a lot of thinking over the weekend about invasives, and am now choosing to do the right thing by buying a native shrub. I want the Common Witch Hazel. I haven't had any luck finding it online, well, one nursery sells it, at least they did in 2010 when their website was last updated, but it was a teeny tiny seedling. I want to get one that is at least 3 feet tall. I may have to go thru Ebay to get it.

Anyway, thanks everyone, for your responses!


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RE: Quick Burning Bush question

I just found it at FF. I looked there earlier today, but was looking for it under "Common" Witch Hazel, not under the "Virginia" Witch Hazel. I didn't know the Virginia one was considered the Common one.


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RE: Quick Burning Bush question

Now, don't go thinking that you have to plant only natives! Hamamelis virginiana is a nice witch hazel; it blooms in the fall, though. If you can find a variety that drops its leaves before it blooms (there was one mentioned in a previous thread on this forum), it will have more impact in the landscape. Also, common witch hazel can get to be small tree size (15-20 ft.). I'm planting some myself next spring!


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RE: Quick Burning Bush question

H. virginiana is a nice enough plant, but has one big drawback in Z6 and colder. Often the fall blooms are completely obscured by the brown leaves still hanging on. There is no significant color except for a nondecript yellow in the fall, either. H. vernalis blooms in the spring and is equally a native plant and might be a better choice.

Neither virginiana nor vernalis has had much in the way of selective breeding or selection for desireable characteristics. This means it's pretty hit or miss in the quality of what you get. Far better in terms of fragrance, plant habit, bloom size, and fall color are, imho, the named hybrids involving the Asian species. Fairweather Gardens and Rarefind Nursery, both close to you in NJ, have excellent selections in the size you're loooking for.


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RE: Quick Burning Bush question

I agree on the Witch Hazel.

If you are going to get one, get yourself a good one.

I've got a couple of the species plants, ... and I wish I had gotten something a bit more impressive.

Something like Pallida or Jelena or Arnold's Promise.

Also Hamamelis Vernalis or Hamamelis Mollis


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RE: Quick Burning Bush question

  • Posted by whaas 5a SE WI (NW) (My Page) on
    Wed, Nov 21, 12 at 21:45

Many H. vernalis cutlivars are superior to x intermedia, mollis and virginiana for zone 6 and above for fall color.

Song Sparrow has several great culitvars available.

Unless seeds are taken from the burning bush from around here and taken to other states I don't understand why they are invasive around here. The reason I actually don't like burning bush is that they are extremely drought intolerant.

Neither virginiana nor vernalis has had much in the way of selective breeding or selection for desirable characteristics.

I have to disagree from the H. vernalis perspective. There are cultivars that have MUCH more reliable fall color than that of the x intermedia cultivars. The color range is nice too. This is based on my experience and conversations with several midwest and eastcoast nursery men.

Large commercial growers need to stop promoting and promulgating this and other weeds like Norway maple and Japanese barberry.

I have to say I love some of my Berberis thunbergii cultivars!


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RE: Quick Burning Bush question

"Unless seeds are taken from the burning bush from around here and taken to other states I don't understand why they are invasive around here."

huh????
________________________________________________________________

Here are some of the better mail-order sources for witchhazels:

Bloom River Gardens (excellent G.WD. rating) - www.bloomriver.com
Broken Arrow Nursery (excellent G.WD. rating) - www.brokenarrownursery.com
Fairweather Gardens (very good G.WD. rating) - www.fairweathergardens.com
ForestFarm (very good G.WD. rating) - www.forestfarm.com
Gossler Farms Nursery (very good G.WD. rating) - www.gosslerfarms.com
Klehm's Song Sparrow Farm & Nursery (excellent G.WD. rating) - www.songsparrow.com
RareFind Nursery (excellent G.WD. rating) - www.rarefindnursery.com
Whitman Farms (excellent G.WD. rating) - whitmanfarms.com


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RE: Quick Burning Bush question

  • Posted by whaas 5a SE WI (NW) (My Page) on
    Fri, Nov 23, 12 at 18:21

LOL, I should have said through animal consumption.

I haven't researched the subject but I know they are listed as invasive around here but they play nice with other plants and I've never seen seedlings.


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RE: Quick Burning Bush question

I think I see how you meant it now, but the species has been found to be invasive in your state too.

The good news?...maybe? (see link below)

Here is a link that might be useful: Sterile Burning Bush?


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