Return to the Shrubs Forum | Post a Follow-Up

 o
Edgworthia crysantha

Posted by shadeyplace 7 (My Page) on
Fri, Nov 8, 13 at 8:17

I have planted this past spring a small one and am wondering if anyone has it and has had success with it in zone 7. Need any winter protection? The last several winters have been very mild but we have also had some zone 5 winters in the past. Thanks for any advice in advance.


Follow-Up Postings:

 o
RE: Edgeworthia chrysantha

A friend has one here in the Knoxville area that's done great. She gave me an offspring and it died (probably because it was not happy in the potting medium but maybe just a combination of transplant shock and neglect). From what she's told me, I don't think it's been the least bit finicky here. Many sources list it hardy through zone 7 (which would mean that it should survive most colder winters that occur in areas of that hardiness zone). BTW, if you are looking it up for info, spell it "Edgeworthia chrysantha".


 o
RE: Edgworthia crysantha

thanks sorry about the typo..


 o
RE: Edgworthia crysantha

It's marginally hardy in your zone. Won't take zone 5 conditions. Figure out how you can protect it if the temperatures are expected to plunge.

See this
http://www.monrovia.com/plant-catalog/plants/3615/paperbush-plant.php

Here is a link that might be useful: Edgworthia


 o
RE: Edgeworthia chrysantha

"Won't take zone 5 conditions."

Zone 5 conditions could include occasional winter temperatures down to probably -25 degrees F. I doubt shadeyplace meant that by saying that there were occasionally zone 5 type conditions. A plant rated for zone 7 will, by definition (if properly rated), handle occasional temperatures quite a bit below the AVERAGE annual minimum temperature for that zone. According to most sources, Edgeworthia chrysantha will handle occasional temperatures well below zero degrees F.

I would be interested to know where shadeyplace lives, OR, just exactly how cold it really had been getting there lately. From what I've seen, I'd think that temperatures that are typical of zone 5 conditions (temperatures that are AVERAGE annual minimum temperature for that zone) should be very rare for any zone 7 area, unless we're talking about a very low zone 7 area and temperatures on the very high end of the average annual zone 5 range.


 o
RE: Edgworthia crysantha

I live in Baltimore Md. I do remember someone saying years ago that we had a "zone 5" winter. Having said that, mostly in the last couple of years it has been mild. Do you think it would be worthwhile to spray it with Wiltproof in December?


 o
RE: Edgeworthia chrysantha

According to what I see online, Baltimore's record low is -7F. That is cold, but it's definitely in the zone 7 range of temperature possibilities. And, BTW, that's not as cold as even average annual minimum lows in zone 5. My GUESS is that, once established, paperbush will be OK there. It wouldn't hurt to provide some protection, especially when young. Various things can help provide a warmer microclimate. A southwest facing brick wall is one way to do it. Planting in higher areas can assure the site is not a cold pocket. And you can even provide artificial protection with something like a few bales of straw for extra cold winters.

I don't think there would be any benefit to using Wilt-Pruf on this deciduous plant. Wilt-Pruf is something only useful for certain situations and this isn't one of them.

Here is a link that might be useful: The Myth of Antitranspirants


 o
RE: Edgworthia crysantha

Many many thanks.


 o
RE: Edgworthia crysantha

I've seen it growing in several areas around Philadelphia if that helps. I'm guessing they might be marginally colder than your area. Good luck, it's a plant I'd like to try but I'm not brave enough to risk it up here.


 o
RE: Edgworthia crysantha

  • Posted by bboy USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA (My Page) on
    Sat, Nov 9, 13 at 19:10

I wouldn't call it fully hardy even in USDA 8; I think I've seen 10 degrees F. being indicated as the minimum for the shrub before, and that there were problems with it in my area during the last big killer winter.

Since few people seem to be able to get their heads around "average annual minimum temperatures" (or are even aware those are what the USDA zone ranges refer to) wrong zone assignments for plants abound in commercial literature particularly. And statements like "it was a Zone 5 winter" are made.


 o
RE: Edgworthia crysantha

thanks..it was actually Allan summers a garden show talk host here in Baltimore LOL I think YOU are correct


 o
RE: Edgworthia crysantha

Mine is flourishing but years ago I planted a very small one and that winter we went into the 20s (very rare here) and that was the end of that Edgeworthia. I just got an 'Akebono' with red flowers - it's tiny and I'm going to grow it in container in the greenhouse until it attains enough size to give it a chance. AND I'll break my usual rules and plant it in spring rather than fall so that it has a chance to get established before winter comes. It's a sweet plant and I love it even when not in bloom. I hope you succeed!

Sara


 o
RE: Edgworthia crysantha

Only noticed comments today.
Have grown it for about 10 years near Atlantic City, NJ. Needs some shade and will die if left to drought. I almost lost mine by having a careless person attend it while I was away in the heat of Summer with no rain for over a week. It came back. Now also growing Tony Avents Snow Cream, and do find it larger and more vigorous than the standard. I had Akabono, but lost it and have replaced it. It just died with no explanation I have. Worth one more try. Mine is zone 7a.


 o
RE: Edgworthia crysantha

would it be good to mulch heavily around it for winter to preserve moisture.? that seems to be the main problem>>not the freezing.


 o
RE: Edgworthia crysantha

are they sort of like Daphnes?>>>just up and die for absolutely no reason?


 o
RE: Edgworthia crysantha

this is what it looks like now (in the wind)..looks like deer have started on leaves and did not like it..YEAH
but it already has buds on it and only 5 months old. (and do not know why it is sideways)!!!arrrgh


 o
RE: Edgworthia crysantha

  • Posted by bboy USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA (My Page) on
    Sun, Nov 10, 13 at 14:02

Put a bigger cage around it to keep browsers off and also provide something to pack with leaves to keep cold away from the top during frigid weather. Use something like freshly fallen oak leaves that won't turn to mush right away.

Flat top with sideways branching is typical, another that grows like this is Daphne odora.


 o
RE: Edgworthia crysantha

Hi Shadyplace, If you get the chance visit the Enid Haupt garden in back of the Smithsonian Castle. There are two monstrous Paper Bushes there. Keep in mind, this is not a dinky, dwarf shrub.
Not sure why browsing is a concern, they will lose their leaves shortly anyway right?
BTW, Valley View Farms in Cockeysville has quite a selection of Edgworthia every Spring.


 o
RE: Edgworthia crysantha

are they sort of like Daphnes?>>>just up and die for absolutely no reason?

Yes they do have that reputation but are probably not as sensitive as the most sensitive daphnes.
Edgeworthia 'Snow Cream' could be both hardier and tougher than other forms. Mine has endured 7F a couple times with blustery drying winds for days on end - almost certainly worse than what is usually experienced in the greater PNW - without any damage at all. It weathered the droughts of 2010, 2011 and 2012 w/o needing to be watered, though it was already pretty large by then and is in good soil that is both well draining (slight slope) and moisture retentive (loamy clay). Mine almost gets full sun.

"Keep in mind, this is not a dinky, dwarf shrub. "
Yeah mine was a little over 3' from a bend in a driveway and gives every indication of one day needing to be trimmed to avoid hitting vehicles. Soon in fact. It looks like it could spread to over 10' wide. It's one of my favorite shrubs though. Very exotic looking in my opinion; even the reddish winter bark is attractive and the overall form is exception. I haven't tried Akebono yet out of a lack of remaining places for something so choice.


 o
RE: Edgworthia crysantha

oops not sure how that double posted...
FWIW everyone says Akebono is less hardy, too.

This post was edited by davidrt28 on Sun, Nov 10, 13 at 17:42


 o
RE: Edgworthia crysantha

This is such good information.. thanks to all. Valley View has them?? good to know! thanks xxoo


 o
RE: Edgworthia crysantha

  • Posted by bboy USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA (My Page) on
    Mon, Nov 11, 13 at 15:52

Depends on how you define "Greater PNW" - as soon as you get some distance from salt water winter temperatures fall right off. In my specific area (Puget Sound, near Seattle) one way that it has been put is that if you can't see salt water from your site you are not in the banana belt.


 o
RE: Edgworthia crysantha

showing my ignorance...never heard of banana belt ??


 o
RE: Edgworthia crysantha

Many plants need heat in order to be hardy- even places like Portland which is inland really don't have the heat than Baltimore has. It certainly makes a difference as to hardiness. Baltimore is relieably warm in the summer.


 o
RE: Edgworthia crysantha

I took this pic Monday. This is one of four large plants of Edgeworthia in back of the Smithsonian Castle. This is a great shrub for winter interest.
 photo 01-13-14007.jpg


 o
RE: Edgworthia crysantha

WOW. thank you so much! Looking forward to this.


 o
RE: Edgworthia crysantha

Shadeyplace, 'banana belt' is a local term for anyplace that is warmer than normal for this area. Areas down next to the salt water are warmer in winter here than places further up and away from Puget Sound. For us up in the hills, Seattle is considered a banana belt and so is the outer coast.
On the flip side, we have warmer summers because the salt water has a cooling effect for those next to it. Salt water here is in the high 40s and moderates the highs and lows.
Mike..Zone 8a, Seattle Zone 8b.


 o
RE: Edgworthia crysantha

Interesting~~~thanks


 o Post a Follow-Up

Please Note: Only registered members are able to post messages to this forum.

    If you are a member, please log in.

    If you aren't yet a member, join now!


Return to the Shrubs Forum

Information about Posting

  • You must be logged in to post a message. Once you are logged in, a posting window will appear at the bottom of the messages. If you are not a member, please register for an account.
  • Please review our Rules of Play before posting.
  • Posting is a two-step process. Once you have composed your message, you will be taken to the preview page. You will then have a chance to review your post, make changes and upload photos.
  • After posting your message, you may need to refresh the forum page in order to see it.
  • Before posting copyrighted material, please read about Copyright and Fair Use.
  • We have a strict no-advertising policy!
  • If you would like to practice posting or uploading photos, please visit our Test forum.
  • If you need assistance, please Contact Us and we will be happy to help.


Learn more about in-text links on this page here