Return to the Soil Forum | Post a Follow-Up

 o
Some questions on leaving fallow

Posted by BrianW23 none (My Page) on
Sun, Mar 23, 14 at 8:13

With the fertilizers we have today, how important is it to have a fallow year when growing crops? Is it ecologically better to have a fallow year than to use excessive fertilizer? Is it necessary to have a cover crop?


Follow-Up Postings:

 o
RE: Some questions on leaving fallow

I'm no expert but I would guess it depends on what you are growing and how large of a plot you have. Are you talking about a home garden or a monoculture over many acres?
Excessive fertilizer is probably never a good idea.
It's not necessary to have a cover crop but I find it very beneficial.
I have been growing vegetables on the same 1000 square foot (50 x 20) space for 17 years with few problems. I put compost and some organic fertilizer on each year, mulch heavily with leaves and hay and in the fall plant winter rye as a cover crop over the winter.
Hope this helps.


 o
RE: Some questions on leaving fallow

Another reason for fallow - or ordinary crop rotation - is to lower the disease and pest burden. When your turnip borers hatch and find a field of oats and no turnips, they starve.

Cover crop, if only to prevent erosion.


 o
RE: Some questions on leaving fallow

I'm hoping to rent an allotment when I move to Sweden and I was wondering if it is worth separating into four sections instead of three, leaving one fallow which will be included in the rotation. Would it still be helpful on such a small piece of land?


 o
RE: Some questions on leaving fallow

Could you define what 'fallow' means to you a bit?
The term means different things to different people-
I could start going on about what it means to *me* and not help you a bit!


 o
RE: Some questions on leaving fallow

Whatever is best for the soil. I really don't know the exact definition as I'm new to gardening.


 o
RE: Some questions on leaving fallow

what size piece of land are you talking about?


 o
RE: Some questions on leaving fallow

I don't know the size yet, I would imagine a rented allotment is about the size of a small garden.


 o
RE: Some questions on leaving fallow

Many define fallow land as having been plowed but left unseeded. However, others of us think of fallow as a garden plot left to rest, and regenerate. That can include tilling the soil, if necessary, and seeding a cover/green manure crop to be turned back in to add some organic mater to the soil.
We are told, in the Bible, to let land remain fallow every 7 years so it can regenerate. Many of the older farmers practiced a 7 year rotation on the fields they worked, although seldom, from my conversations with them, was the field left barren and exposed to the ravages of the sun, wind, and rain. A green manure/cover crop of some kind was usually planted in that fallow field.
I find very little to nothing about leaving fields fallow today although many people do practice adding compost and other forms of vegetative waste regularly in the hope that would eliminate the need to leave land fallow.


 o
RE: Some questions on leaving fallow

I just try to keep feeding organic matter and rotating crops as best as possible.


 o
RE: Some questions on leaving fallow

•Posted by BrianW23 none (My Page) on Mon, Mar 24, 14 at 5:29


I don't know the size yet, I would imagine a rented allotment is about the size of a small garden

I'm guessing a small garden is "small" so I would say leaving part of it fallow wouldn't be a good idea. It would be just wasted space. How long are you planning on staying there?
If only a couple of years I would plant as intensively as you'd care to.


 o
RE: Some questions on leaving fallow

BrianW23 - I doubt you'll have space to leave a quarter fallow. If you make lots of compost, add muck and move your crops about a bit you don't need it. I've never seen (intentional) fallow areas at my allotments and I've had mine over 20 years. They are all crammed to the gunnels all the time.


 o
RE: Some questions on leaving fallow

I thought it would be a case of just rotating but I thought it was worth checking just in case. Thank you everybody. Darth_weeder - I'm planning on staying for life.


 o
RE: Some questions on leaving fallow

Perhaps this article might be of some use.

Here is a link that might be useful: crop rotation


 o
RE: Some questions on leaving fallow

As kimmsr's link suggests, crop rotation is of limited importance in a small garden Even if you move things around they are so close together that pests and diseases can travel from one area to another whatever you do. I just do a rough legume, brassica and 'other stuff' system but I don't sweat it if I have a space which needs filling or a plant which needs a home. They just go where they will fit.


 o
RE: Some questions on leaving fallow

A lot of diseases and pests, even the ones with the broad ranges, don't affect both grassy and broadleaf species. Therefore instead of fallow you can plan to use one section for monocot/grassy species of veggies, such as onions, garlic or corn. Not sure if corn will grow in Sweden though. Other sections can be used for dicot species.


 o
RE: Some questions on leaving fallow

Good luck in Sweden and tell us how the garden works out.


 o
RE: Some questions on leaving fallow

Thank you all for your advice. I'm thinking that rotating might be good for the soil anyway. I've still got plenty of time to think about that before I move.

Thank you darth - I'll let you know.


 o Post a Follow-Up

Please Note: Only registered members are able to post messages to this forum.

    If you are a member, please log in.

    If you aren't yet a member, join now!


Return to the Soil Forum

Information about Posting

  • You must be logged in to post a message. Once you are logged in, a posting window will appear at the bottom of the messages. If you are not a member, please register for an account.
  • Please review our Rules of Play before posting.
  • Posting is a two-step process. Once you have composed your message, you will be taken to the preview page. You will then have a chance to review your post, make changes and upload photos.
  • After posting your message, you may need to refresh the forum page in order to see it.
  • Before posting copyrighted material, please read about Copyright and Fair Use.
  • We have a strict no-advertising policy!
  • If you would like to practice posting or uploading photos, please visit our Test forum.
  • If you need assistance, please Contact Us and we will be happy to help.


Learn more about in-text links on this page here