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Plants that like nitrogen soil

Posted by gramsharon 3-4 (My Page) on
Thu, Oct 3, 13 at 11:04

Hello,
My name is Sharon. I reside in zone 4, northern Mn. I l am a regular from the seed exchange forum. I've been amending my soil and came upon a question I hope I may have addressed here? What plants (flowers) like nitrogen based soil? I seem to recall hydrangeas, roddies and azaleas do. I just wonder what others are in that category? How about annuals as well?
Thank you.
Gramsharon


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Plants that like nitrogen soil

Not sure what you mean by "nitrogen based soil". Can you explain that a bit?


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RE: Plants that like nitrogen soil

There is one plant family that I heard of which will take up excessive nitrogen from the soil until their plant tissues nitrogen reach intoxicating level and become unsuitable for human and animal consumption ----- Amaranth.


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RE: Plants that like nitrogen soil

It sounds like you're looking for acidic soil loving plants given the plants you listed.

You can do a quick web search and get many lists of plants.


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RE: Plants that like nitrogen soil

Soils in Minnesota tend to be acidic, a low soil pH, but since Nitrogen is fairly volatile I would not think that would be the soil problem you are thinking. Linked below is a list from Purdue and I am sure your University of Minnesota Cooperative Extension Service would have that information as well.

Here is a link that might be useful: Plants for acidic soils


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RE: Plants that like nitrogen soil

Thank you for the input. I didn't realize nitrogen soil is the same as acidic soil. I had done a google search for nitrogen soil with few results. Using acidic soil is what I needed to do. Happy gardening.
Gramsharon


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RE: Plants that like nitrogen soil

First...plants that tend to like nitrogen soil...the simple answer would be yes. Right up to the point that excessive amounts kills them, which is possible, but rare under most conditions.

Acidic soil is not the same as nitrogen soil. While other elements do compete for uptake (aluminum would be an example), the definition of acid is the concentration of hydrogen.

so how do soils in MN wind up being mostly acidic?

I'd really like to know. Because after having lived and worked there (in agriculture and horticulture), I can tell you this much: If you spent any time in the gardening world, you learned which areas were acidic in nature. They were so abnormal as to be worthy of note.

It was actually a shock to me that oaks and maples could have summer time colors other than yellow.


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RE: Plants that like nitrogen soil

First time I ever heard of acidic soils referred to as "nitrogen based" or "nitrogen soils".

Until I got to TX all of soils I dealt with were acidic, and liming was a periodic exercise. The calcareous clay here was a new experience.


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RE: Plants that like nitrogen soil

"so how do soils in MN wind up being mostly acidic?"

It's mostly a property of northern MN soils because of a mix of historical geology + common plants. A huge chunk of northern MN used to be underwater lake land and a lot of the plants/trees common up there are evergreen pines and similar.

In Western and Southern MN, it's not uncommon to find soils closer to neutral or alkaline.


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RE: Plants that like nitrogen soil

Most any soil scientist will tell you that the soils in Minnesota are acidic because of the amount of rain they receive each year. As a general rule soils east of the Mississippi tend to be acidic while those westward tend to be alkaline, all due to the amount of rainfall.


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RE: Plants that like nitrogen soil

"... all due to the amount of rainfall."

While rainfall contributes to the result, it is not the most significant determinant of soil pH. Most soil scientists will tell you that the geological origin and the attendant soil texture along with marine sediment incorporated into the soil is more significant than rainfall.


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RE: Plants that like nitrogen soil

"What plants (flowers) like nitrogen based soil?"

When soils are high in nitrogen, such as those amended heavily with manures, they will grow leaves well, but may not flower well or, over time, be as healthy as they would be in a more balanced soil. One fall I mulched with what was supposed to be well-aged manure. Over the next several years the leaves on the Lady's Mantle plants grew huge and flopped over and my hydrangea in that bed did not flower well. Only now, 3 years later, are the plants beginning to look more 'normal' altho the Lady's Mantle leaves are still larger than those of other LM plants in other areas of my garden. Obviously, to me, I applied too much of the old manure and it created an unbalanced soil high in nitrogen.

From everything I've read high nitrogen is not the same as normal soil acidity altho perhaps high nitrogen might lead to acidity until it leached/gassed out and the soil reverted to it's normal pH.


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