Return to the Soil Forum | Post a Follow-Up

 o
Indoor composting?

Posted by fieldofflowers 3 or 4a (My Page) on
Sun, Oct 27, 13 at 17:28

Is having a compost system even possible in an apartment situation? And to do so without a smell?


Follow-Up Postings:

 o
RE: Indoor composting?

There are two choices in this situation: bokashi, which is a fermentation type of system. However it does not make actual compost, it sort of goes halfway and something has to be done with the product. You can read about it here or search the web.

The other is a worm bin, which can live under your sink or in a closet.

If properly managed neither one should smell.


 o
RE: Indoor composting?

I feel ashamed to be throwing out my indoor garden clippings and my kitchen scraps.
I tried purchasing something that I thought was it (was expensive enough) but it turned out to just be a collector to hold the scraps temporarily and a tiny one at that. The stuff got pretty ripe as I waited to find someone to drive over to the city compost heap. (No one wanted to and taking it on the bus was out of the question. lol!) I eventually gave the unit away to someone who might use it.

I like the idea of a worm bin but it sounded complicated to set up the last time I looked into it. I would be able to use the stuff when it is decomposed, right? The other doesn't sound likely.


 o
RE: Indoor composting?

If you use a worm bin then it's not decomposing, as the worms eat the stuff you put in the bin.
Worm casts (poop) can be used as a soil amendment both inside and out.


 o
RE: Indoor composting?

See also: Vermicomposting Forum - GardenWeb "This forum is meant for the discussion of vermicomposting and vermiculture--the raising of earth worms for the creation of a healthy soil. "


 o
RE: Indoor composting?

It's a big problem with apartment dwellers. Some day I hope to see organic waste bins at apartment complexes. Only a few places do it now.

I was thinking, if you have a freezer with any space in it, you could freeze your kitchen scraps in a plastic bag. When you have several of them, pull them all out and get them somewhere for composting all at once. No odors that way.


 o
RE: Indoor composting?

You have been given good advice and hopfuly you try the worms. If you don't go with worms,I have more to add about composting. Composting doesn't have to cause odors that prevent doing it on your outdoor private patio. If it has enough C and correct moisture level,there should be no problems. Granted it will be frozen much of the time in your area but freeze-thaw cycles are actualy benificial. The process will be slower but it will happen. I would suggest you use a free or inexpensive container rather than buying anything. Use your imagination to paint and/or decorate the container so it looks at home. And above all (I will be blasted for saying this) don't feel ashamed if you must trash the waste for now. Heroic efforts to recycle are not expected of you. The shame is on apartment owners who refuse to dedicate an area for tenants to recycle.


 o
RE: Indoor composting?

I don't have a patio or freezer space (it's large enough to store my frozen meat, vegetables and leftovers.) But anything beyond that no.

So gleaning what I can from the advice so far, composting is a no (sadly), but the worm bin is a good idea. I may even be able to set one up outside in the far end of the lawn as long as it is hidden along with the other garden supplies.


 o
RE: Indoor composting?

And I'd suspect as long as I don't get in trouble with the head gardener, the worm bin should be safe from thieves. (unless that would be their thing, but eh that'd be odd.) But given that we already had our first snowfall and shipping/finding worms might be a bad idea with freezing/sub freezing weather on the forecast, starting on the project may be a little late.

But I still like the idea of planning and setting up what I can to start the project in the spring.


 o
RE: Indoor composting?

If you're in a reasonably big town and have a Freecycle or Craigslist group (or both), you might be able to source worms by posting asking for them locally. People with worm bins are often quite generous in sharing a handful to get others started.


 o
RE: Indoor composting?

I give out red wigglers any time freecyclers ask! I usually only have to dig in about a shovel full to give them 30 or so wormies!
I'm in zone 8ish, so mine keep going all year round! Nancy


 o
RE: Indoor composting?

Worm composting or Vermicomposting, seems to me the only practical indoor composting. Fisherman, at least those who use worms, might be especially interested.

I tried Bokashi for a year, gave it up, did not seem to be worth the effort. Think of it as partly indoor composting only.

Worm composting can be done on the cheap, with several plastic rubbermaid containers. You have to keep track of it, and be aware of a few possible problems. But it does make the best compost.


 o
RE: Indoor composting?

Here is a link to a composting in terracotta containers. This can be done in a small balcony or patio. It looks attractive and there is no smell.
http://www.elpasotwigs.com/garden/composting.html

Here is a link that might be useful: www.elpasotwigs.com


 o
RE: Indoor composting?

HI,
Im new but would like to chime in here. I compost indoors with worms. I have for several years now. I have a 55 gallon system running in my home at the moment, but started with rubber maid totes. It can be done in a closet, and if you follow the rules, at least initially, your bin will give off only a small earthy smell. Reminds me of patchouli or sandal wood incense. If your interested, but not too sure, check out mary appelhofs book 'worms eat my garbage' for a primer. Ill add a link as well for a video on how to get going.
Regards from Canada
John

Here is a link that might be useful: Setting Up a Basic Worm Bin


 o Post a Follow-Up

Please Note: Only registered members are able to post messages to this forum.

    If you are a member, please log in.

    If you aren't yet a member, join now!


Return to the Soil Forum

Information about Posting

  • You must be logged in to post a message. Once you are logged in, a posting window will appear at the bottom of the messages. If you are not a member, please register for an account.
  • Posting is a two-step process. Once you have composed your message, you will be taken to the preview page. You will then have a chance to review your post, make changes and upload photos.
  • After posting your message, you may need to refresh the forum page in order to see it.
  • Before posting copyrighted material, please read about Copyright and Fair Use.
  • We have a strict no-advertising policy!
  • If you would like to practice posting or uploading photos, please visit our Test forum.
  • If you need assistance, please Contact Us and we will be happy to help.


Learn more about in-text links on this page here