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On Gardening Gloves

Posted by Violet_Z6 6a (My Page) on
Tue, Jul 1, 03 at 10:49

All my life I've been a person who never wears gloves. Every once in a while, I'll find a pair of winter gloves or gardening gloves that I think I'll wear. I'll bring them home and put them on, only to take them off within a few minutes. I finally gave up and told myself I wasn't going to waste the money any more.

This spring I was at a plant sale with many "hard core" gardeners in attendance. About five totally separate people I knew, asked if I "had the gloves?" As in, did I already own them or was I going to get them? And if not, then I should get them. To each I responded, I don't buy gloves because I never wear them and always end up taking them off. They each said they were the same way too until they found "those gloves". So I asked, ok - show me and tell me why you like them. They were light, thin, flexible, and comfortable but of course I had not "put them to the test". Their responses were, "mud doesn't cake up on them because of the texture of the latex", "my hands sweat a lot and these are cotton and they breathe so well", "they're really light", "they're so thin, I can feel what I'm doing", "feel how flexible they are", "you can wash them"...

Ok, so I tried some on. Humm.... not too bad, they fit, they're light. What about the price? They were selling for $5.00 and one of the gardeners had told me they had bought theirs for over $9.00 just a month ago. Well, I'm a skeptic and I hadn't planned on spending hardly any money. I did notice that a lot of people had purchasing the gloves so I asked some other long time gardeners I knew about them. They all said those were the best gloves.

Ok, I'll give them a try. They're on sale and every long time gardener is telling me that they never wore gloves until they found those and they sure aren't getting anything for telling me.

Well, I have to say... I absolutely love them. I can transplant seedlings with them they're so thin. And at the same time they're durable enough to withstand moving rocks and thorny blackberry bushes, and slimy mud and gripping garden spades. Everyone was right. Mud doesn't cake on, they're breathable, they're amazingly flexible and comfortable. They don't have those annoying seams that are so uncomfortable with other gloves. It's official - I'm a convert. In fact, one day I couldn't find them and spent a half hour just looking for them because I'd become so accustomed to using them I missed them! That was the first time I realized how much I really did appreciate them. Found them the next day... whew! Told myself I should get another pair just in case! LOL!

So what are they?

I guess the most common generic term for them is 'grip garden gloves'. Different companies make them from what I can tell. The front is a thin, flexible, textured, latex coating which goes just over the fingertips on the back just enough to keep your fingers dry even if you're picking up something muddy. Pretty cool. The glove itself is a very flexible, stretchy, extremely breathable cotton material. And there's a bit of elastic at the top, not too tight to hurt but just enough to prevent things from falling into your glove while your using them. The latex really does "grip" tools really well, so much so, you'll notice when you don't have them on.

I've seen them in different colors. The cotton is usually off white or some other variation on ivory. The latex comes is a lighter green, grey, blue, and any other number of colors. In fact, I was looking for pictures and found a purple one I'm going to have to keep an eye out for - my goal for my future second pair. LOL!

I saw the same gloves at my local grocery store in the "hardware" section being sold for about $6.00 by Stanley. So there are obviously many uses and many makers and suppliers.

For what it's worth, I highly recommend them - as you can tell.

Here are pictures of what they look like. If the latex comes up higher on any gloves you see on the back - than those are not what I'm talking about. I am only referring to those which resemble the gloves in the following pictures and mine do not have anything printed on the back side.

Close up of the texture of the latex from my own gloves:



Hope this helps someone out there...

:)

Violet




Follow-Up Postings:


 o RE: 'Gloves off gardening?'/Consider This

  • Posted by: jean001 z8aPortland, OR (My Page) on Sat, Jun 28, 03 at 15:00

Is this an ad?



 o RE: 'Gloves off gardening?'/Consider This

  • Posted by: weed30 St. Louis MO (My Page) on Sat, Jun 28, 03 at 15:18

Those look great! My fingernails are always filthy despite wearing gloves - these look like they'd help a lot with that.



 o RE: 'Gloves off gardening?'/Consider This

jean001,

It's not an "ad". I've been on the forums for a couple of years and post regularly at a couple of other forums. I don't post regularly at the soil forum but I do stop in every once in a while and the "Gloves off gardening?" thread got me thinking... that if someone had told me about these gloves, I might have tried them a long time ago.

Anyone who "knows me" at the other forms like the vegetable, seed, and plant exchanges would know it's not an ad coming from me. Besides, there is not one main manufacturer or brand that I know of as I explained above. I just like to share information that I've found useful as you can tell from my page.

:)




 o RE: 'Gloves off gardening?'/Consider This

  • Posted by: Katy5 Seattle, WA (My Page) on Sat, Jun 28, 03 at 16:17

Atlas also makes a "summer weight" glove that's even thinner- I can't use my blue ones anymore because they are just too thick! They haven't worn out yet and I use them every day...

:)
Katy



 o RE: 'Gloves off gardening?'/Consider This

Violet, I looked at your link, and think you should hang around more!



 o RE: 'Gloves off gardening?'/Consider This

Katy,

I don't think you can determine the thickness of the glove by color alone but I may be wrong. It just depends on the manufacturer. You could very likely stumble acroos some thin blue colored gloves by a different maker.

The ones I'm referring to are #310 gloves, so look for those because they're thinner. The #300 Glove is slightly heavier than the #310 Glove. Sizes include XSmall, Small, Medium, Large, and Xlarge.



 o Hi Sharon

Sharon_9_FL,

LOL! I suppose I'll take that as a compliment...?

:)




 o RE: 'Gloves off gardening?'/Consider This

got any socks?



 o RE: 'Gloves off gardening?'/Consider This

Not lined with latex...



 o RE: 'Gloves off gardening?'/Consider This

Yes, yes, a thousand times, yes !
Those are the gloves!
I used to be a hard core leather glove man but after I started using those gloves for a while I was hooked.
and I don't have to take off my gloves as much for detail work with those type gloves.
I'll still wear leather gloves but not nearly as much.
and I'll always wear gloves (I've got the scars to show why.)
ialbtc



 o RE: 'Gloves off gardening?'/Consider This

Violet_Z6

Thank you so much for the great lead! I started the Gloves off thread because I hate wearing gloves that restrict my ability to feel what I'm working with. These gloves sound awesome. I like how thin they are, my problem with the gloves I've used in the past is that they were too thick to dry sufficiently between use. Hopefully I can get my hands on these here in Texas! I'm sure that I'll continue to do most of my work glove free, but like the option of having a good pair like these around for those messy or painful jobs!

Joanna



 o RE: 'Gloves off gardening?'/Consider This

  • Posted by: Monte 6-NE NJ (My Page) on Sat, Jun 28, 03 at 20:29

I just wanted to say your member page is awesome. To repeat Sharon, you should hang around here some more.



 o RE: 'Gloves off gardening?'/Consider This

I use playtex gloves, I have found the more expensive gloves shown in the photos do not allow for finger flexibly. Those gloves, I am sure would last longer and be cheaper in the long run however, then constandly having to replace the playtex gloves.



 o RE: 'Gloves off gardening?'/Consider This

I started using this type of glove last year. I'm also a convert from leather gloves. I still like leather for really rugged tasks like moving lumber or rocks, but the cotton-backed latex is what I use for almost all other things. I sometimes take them off for delicate weeding tasks around the bases of plants, but that's about it. A major advantage they have over leather is that the slivers in shredded bark mulch don't penetrate the latex. I used to hate working around bark mulch with leather gloves because I'd spend days pulling the tiny wood splinters out of my fingers.

There are many different brands. I don't pay enough attention to the brands to recommend one over the other. They are all inexpensive.



 o RE: 'Gloves off gardening?'/Consider This

I look forward to getting these gloves. They look great. And holy cow, I concur about Violet's member page being an amazing resource. Whoa! Thanks!



 o RE: 'Gloves off gardening?'/Consider This

  • Posted by: Katy5 Seattle, WA (My Page) on Sat, Jun 28, 03 at 22:01

Violet, those blue ones by atlas that you displayed a picture of were the ones I was referring to- Atlas also makes an even thinner one - #370 - that is great for summer and small weeds. :)
K



 o RE: 'Gloves off gardening?'/Consider This

This is so funny - I just this weekend bought about 10 pairs of these gloves, the blue ones. One of the local drugstores was having some sort of big sale, and these were $1.00 per pair. Can't wait to try them out.



 o RE: 'Gloves off gardening?'/Consider This

I have found that there are different grades of gloves, the less expensive gloves have a thinner layer of latex (or some such material) and I have found in my travels that the more expensive types last longer and wash well in the cloths washer (none of those gloves can take a tumble in the dryer without the latex getting all "gummy", so I always air dry mine.)
ialbtc



 o RE: 'Gloves off gardening?'/Consider This

I have some of those gloves too, and I really liked them. I usually wear leather work gloves, except for planting, and those were sooooo flexible!

I got mine in a package of assorted gardening gloves from Cost-Co. Don't remember how much they were, but it seems like there were about 5 or 6 different pairs for about $12.



 o RE: 'Gloves off gardening?'/Consider This

I've tried them and remaim unconverted.



 o RE: 'Gloves off gardening?'/Consider This

Interesting ... I usually use cheap leather gloves and change them often if they get sweat-soaked, but if these will let my skin "breathe" they might work.

FYI: hospital labs and the electronics industry use "glove liners" ... disposable cotton knit, usually leaves fingertips bare. These are great for the times you have to wear latex or other sweat-inducing gloves.



 o RE: 'Gloves off gardening?'/Consider This

I was watching Paul James this morning on HGTV, after checking out this forum. They were featuring a guy talking about perennials, and he was wearing these gloves! They're everywhere!



 o RE: 'Gloves off gardening?'/Consider This

I have these gloves and I love them! I happened to pick them up at the grocery store for $3 last winter (they're marked up to $5 now) and I told my daughter they're the best gardening gloves I've ever used! I do like the feature of the snug fit around the wrist to prevent the dirt from getting inside the glove.



 o RE: 'Gloves off gardening?'/Consider This

  • Posted by: Oak_St 5b Chicago burb (My Page) on Mon, Jun 30, 03 at 8:48

I use 'em too.
If you want to keep your nails clean(er) use a glove liner with them.
If you want to dry them in the dryer just don't dry them all the way to toast and they won't get gummy.
Marianne



 o RE: 'Gloves off gardening?'/Consider This

I have seen these in gardening stores for as much as $9. If anyone has trouble locating them for a reasonable price, there's lots of places to order them online. Here is just one site that I have used with good prices and service, a google search for Atlas Fit Gloves turns up a lot more.

Here is a link that might be useful: Glove source



 o RE: 'Gloves off gardening?'/Consider This

I am going to have to keep my eyes peeled for these, currently I double glove my hands with hospital grade surgical gloves yet still find on occassion that one of my fingernails will pierce through the end, ruining a perfectly good manicure! Thank you for putting in the photos that really helps in knowing what to look for. The pickings are slim up here in Alaska so if I find them, I know they will be a bit pricy, but if they work, save my manicures, I figure it will all even out over the long haul.
Many thanks again!
LadyHills
Sylvia in Alaska


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: On Gardening Gloves

This thread cracks me up, I've been using these gloves for what seems forever! (5 years anyway) About 5 years ago I worked for a Co. that manufactured Semi-trailers, I worked on the floor doing all the things that the guys did. These were one of the selections we had for gloves and I agree, they are great gloves for gardening, crap for handling steel or any hot work though *chuckles* and if they get wet they do get slick and make a tight grip a problem. At least the one's we had did, they might have changed that. Note - we had different colors as well, but the color defined the glove size.

Needless to say, a couple of pairs of these have managed to find their way to my home to use in the garden, before they were garden gloves :) or before I knew them as such.


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RE: On Gardening Gloves

  • Posted by weebus Z8 Sunset 5 WA (My Page) on
    Tue, Jul 1, 03 at 14:41

Ya, I thought they had them everywhere, forever. Been using them for eons.


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RE: On Gardening Gloves

I always used those gloves untill I found Foxgloves. Now I'm hooked on Foxgloves. They are so form fitting that you can pick out the smallest seedling when weeding, and my nails have faired much better than with any other glove.

Diann
IA z5a

Here is a link that might be useful: Foxgloves Garden Gloves


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RE: On Gardening Gloves

I saw them at Home Depot for 5 bucks a pair....bought my wife 2 pair early this spring and now..." I'm a ten dollar Hero " !!!!!!!!!


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RE: On Gardening Gloves

I'm not a glove person either, I like to feel what I'm doing (except maybe when I use a rake since I blister in about 5 seconds)....

Kim - can you tell if are you not a convert to these particular type of gloves, or just not a glove person??

And Violet, not being a former glove person, why did you want to start wearing gloves?

thanks
K :)


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RE: On Gardening Gloves

I, too, never wore gloves until I found these. I've seen them go by the name "Mud Gloves". I get them for around $5 at my local nursery, and always buy them as little gifts for fellow gardeners.


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RE: On Gardening Gloves

klynnnn,

>And Violet, not being a former glove person, why did you want to >start wearing gloves?

Let's see... I don't think that I "wanted to start wearing gloves" exactly." But I'd mention to my DH how much my hands would hurt sometimes because the soil around here is on the clay side so it rapidly sucks the moisture out of your skin after handling it. It's not that I mind getting my hands dirty, so much as them becoming dry and cracked - even with the best of moisturizers. He kept saying over and over how much gloves would help. So if we were ever at a garden center, I'd look at the gloves, try some on. Never liked any.

Like you, I like to feel what I'm doing. So, as I posted above, numerous gardeners were telling me their tried and true experiences with them so I thought - well - ok, I'll try them (with no expectations). The gloves are thin enough that I can feel what I'm doing whether I'm transplanting seedlings, crumbling up chunks of dirt, etc. And at the same time, they don't cake up with dirt/mud, they're light in weight, and there are no seams, so compared to any other glove I've tried on, they're incredibly comfortable and incredibly durable.

I noticed over time that I could just slip them off when going inside and not have to spend ten minutes trying to get the dirt out from under my nails. My hands are no longer suffering from handling clay soil. I also noticed a big difference when using tools. The latex grips the handles and you can actually use your tools better because you have more traction. I didn't realize it until I picked up my spade and started using it without the gloves! There's a huge difference.

So for you and blisters, I highly recommend you try them. They're worth every penny of $5.00. But keep in mind that not all brands are created equal. Different brands can look exactly the same but be completely different, so try them on first.

All in all, why did I want to start wearing gloves? Your answer is: because I started wearing those gloves and found over time that I'd rather garden with them on than off 90% of the time! LOL!

Diann,
I'm interested checking out the Foxgloves Garden Gloves. They look like they might be worth trying if the price is not too high. Thanks for the link!

:)



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RE: On Gardening Gloves

Hi Violet and all,
I use em too. I hate wearing gloves but also hate the way digging in the dirt makes my fingernails soft and my hands so gross. I've gotten much better now that I found these.

Btw, on the forum page it shows that this thread has had 7 posts. I count 33....not counting my post. No biggie, I just thought it was kinda odd:-)


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RE: On Gardening Gloves

Violet, Foxgloves are a bit on the pricy side, 25 bucks a pair. But once you try them you'll never go back to anything else. I have 4 or 5 pairs of the Mud Gloves you talk about and they were fine, but for me, the Foxglove is far superior. I did see a cheaper version at Target, but since I have 3 pairs of Foxgloves, I didn't bother with the cheaper versions. I do have a pair of the heavy duty orange rubber-type glove for working directly in water (as in when I'm bleaching iris or something similar), but for general purpose gardening I'm afraid I'm hooked on FG's. ;)

Diann
Iowa Z5a


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RE: On Gardening Gloves

Diann,

Thanks for the input on the Foxgloves. How about durability? The content on the website seems to indicate they only last for one seaseon. Of course I realize this is dependent on how much use they get. Any comments?

I have a feeling it'll be on the Christmas wish list...

;)



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RE: On Gardening Gloves

I realize that I am coming in on the tail end of this but I have been one of those who does not wear gloves either. I have about 6 pair and only used the leather ones for brush and briars. A good friend gave me a part of inexpensive "weed pulling gloves" from Target as a gift. I was very skeptical until I put them on. The tops are very light non binding knit and the rubberized palms have just enough texture to get the job done without driving you crazy. Now if I am still wearing them at the end of the season will be the real test, but for the time being-I do like them and them are cheap. I cannot justify the price of Foxgloves and then leave them laying or lose them in the beds.


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RE: On Gardening Gloves

Violet, I have 3 pairs now, not because they wear out easily, but because I wanted different colors. ;) I have purple, blue and now red.:) I've found that they wear like iron for me. I had the thumb of my original pair come unstitched, but I just stitched it back up and it's as good as new. I really think that I'll get several years out of these gloves. I'm not the least bit easy on these gloves. I wear them for all my weeding or digging in the mud and muck and general gardening chores. They work fine for me.

Also, I have the original kind of Foxglove, not the ones with the gripping bumps. I might have to try a pair of those when and if these wear out. :)

Gardeningfool, I can understand not wanting to shell out a lot of money over gloves if you thought that you might lose them. I don't lose my stuff. I still have all the orginal tools I bought 10 years ago. Let me know how the Target gloves work out for you, I was curious about those.

I've always had really long natural fingernails and gardening season would take its toll on them. Last year and this year I've had the best looking nails since before I started gardening. ;) I got my sister and sister-in-laws these gloves for Christmas last year. They all love them and so do their manicurists. ;)

Now, these are not meant for use when pruning roses or pulling thorny weeds. For that I just slip a pair of leather gloves over the top of them. works just fine. They are cooler than my mud-gloves were and they do as good if not better of a job that the mud gloves did in keeping dirt and mud off my hands and from under my fingernails. If you only wash them once or twice a year like I do, you'll probably get some very fine dust around your nails, but that's about it.

Violet, If you get a pair, let me know how you like them.

Diann
Iowa Z5a


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RE: On Gardening Gloves



Posted by: northernflower (My Page) on Mon, Jul 7, 03 at 22:25

I also was not a glove person, until I started showing up at work with those dirt lined hands that resist cleaning . To be more presentable I had to force myself to try gloves also. I dont know how many other types I tried before I fell on those kinds and now I must have six pairs. I find I buy a good brand sold up here, there are lots of copies. I have a thicker green pair for when its wetter out, the thin grey pair for eveyday weeding and the cotton liner because no matter how much I try ,.....the dirt gets under my nails. There is some more heavy duty types for roses, etc. Some people are glove people.....others arent.....but at least they are all gardeners.......



 o RE: 'Gloves off gardening?'/Consider This

Too bad that they are latex. As a nurse, I had to wear latex gloves in the hospital for years--until one day I started having a allergic reaction. It got to the point that I thought I was going to have to give up nursing after a 20 year career. The latex allergy got so bad that the skin on my hands started sluffing off in huge hunks. I finally went to Infection Control and told them if they couldn't come up with an alternative to latex that I would have to quit my job and give up nursing. After a survey was done at my hospital, they found other nurses with my same problem. Now they have special gloves in hospitals and other facilities for nurses with latex allergies--also, a lot of patients are allergic to latex.

I would just love to be able to use the gloves that are being discussed here because as mentioned earlier, clay eats up the moisture of your hands and mine stay cracked and ugly all summer. Not a good advertisement to patients when you are giving patient care and they see your hands. And cracked hands leaves your skin open to put you at risk for contracting infections that you come in contact with at the hospital. If anyone comes up with some gloves like these, but uses something else rather than latex, I would love to know about it. I would jump on them in a heart beat.
Thanks,
Sheila



 o RE: 'Gloves off gardening?'/Consider This

My compliments on your gw pages Violet. They are a wonderful resource.

I am a diehrd goatskin glove wearer, so I won't try these latex gloves. You might want to try goatskin Sheila. They don't repel water unless you oil them, I've used minkoil & lanolin, and I get dirt inside and under my nails. But they are very strong, flexable, breathable & comfortable.



 o RE: 'Gloves off gardening?'/Consider This

Sheila,

I know this probably won't help, but the latex is on the outside of the glove, your skin is incontact with the cotton part. My DH is also alergic to the latex gloves but he likes the kind we're talking about.

As for other glove suggestions for anyone whose skin is sensitive/allergic to either the latex in latex gloves and/or the powder inside... try these:

Foxglove made of SUPPLEX nylon for durability and LYCRA spandex.




OR



Allerderm Vinyl gloves recommended because they are "latex-free, powder-free, and provide waterproof protection and an excellent chemical barrier." They're safe for sensitive hands because they do not contain chemicals used in ordinary gloves and run about $3.00 a pair.

Allerderm Heavy Duty Vinyl Gloves





 o RE: 'Gloves off gardening?'/Consider This

Violet,

I am also a person who does not like wearing gloves, and I was SO excited reading your post... until I scrolled down and saw the picture... of MY gloves, lol! Yes, these are the gloves that I currently use. I still find myself taking them off for several reasons - at times they get too hot, or if I need to do intricate work (seedlings, etc.).

I will say that so far, they are the most comfortable gloves, and the best all-around gloves, I've tried. I also can throw these in the washer (and dryer) with good results.

Those foxgloves are looking good! I'll have to check them out. Now, I'm off to look at Violet's member page!

:)
Dee



 o RE: 'Gloves off gardening?'/Consider This

Althea & Violet: Thank you both for your suggestions. I could probably use the gloves if it is as you said, the latex is on the outside. I say this, because when I used vinyl gloves in the hospital (the non-sterile kind), they would not stay on my hands when I was performing a dirty job, so I would put the latex over the top of the vinyl to keep them on my hands, therefore, not having the latex directly in contact with my skin. Violet, I will check out the links that you so kindly provided, thanks so much the both of you for your suggestions.
Sheila



 o RE: 'Gloves off gardening?'/Consider This

This is for all you "non" glove wearers.
For 25 years I never wore gloves. My hands were tough and gloves were always to hot, anyway. Last month I bought a truck load of fresh manure compost and spread it on my lawn and planted a few plants with the remaining compost. Saturday morning I had a hangnail before starting and thought nothing of it. That afternoon after washing up I noticed a speck of compost had worked its way under my cuticle. I picked it out and poured hydrogen peroxide over my nail and put a little dab of Neosporin on it , too. Sunday morning the side of my finger was slightly swollen and pink. No big deal. By Monday morning my finger had swollen to twice its size and was turning purple. I had to go the emergency room and get a tetnus shot and have my finger nail surgically removed. Also, the Dr, put me on antibiotics for 14 days for staff infection. So, the motto of this story is: Practice safe gardening--WEAR GLOVES!
John in SC


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will do!

Diann,

Thank you for the further information. I will surely let you know how I like them. Purple is my favorite color! LOL!

;)



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RE: On Gardening Gloves

I could never stand to wear gloves because I always had a half inch of cloth hanging off the tip of each of my short fingers! The best part about the Atlas gloves is they come in a ladies SMALL! (I've seen the Atlas before but not in the smaller size.) I happened upon a pair at a nursery and tried them on, expecting to be disappointed again - I've found smalls before that were tighter around the hand but still too long in the finger.

These actually FIT! And because of the knit material, they don't creep back down my fingers and thumb but stay put. I have both the heavier blue mud gloves and the very light weight ones that are great for transplanting because you really CAN feel what you are doing.

In 2 months, I changed from Never wearing gloves to Always wearing them. It is so nice to slip out my hands and not have to soak for 1/2 hour before going to work.


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RE: On Gardening Gloves

At the store where I worked we used to sell those golves, I always heard rave reviews!! They are tough, light, reasonably priced, and effective. (I havn't used them, but I don't do a lot of gardening)


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RE: On Gardening Gloves

i was waiting to see some over-priced pair of nouveau gloves when i started reading your post, Violet. i was pleasantly surprised to see "MY GLOVES" instead! i picked these up at our farmer's / flea market for $1/pair about a month ago. and i think i've tried nearly every other kind of glove there is.i still use leather for thorny stuff but i couldn't give up "MY GLOVES" for anything now!


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RE: On Gardening Gloves

Gardening glove of the year down here...:)

I have been doing a lot more gardening over the past couple of years and these gloves have been a boon to my 'little' hands. As mentioned by others they 'fit' and there isn't half a mile of finger unfilled.

At first they were only available at nurseries but now seem to be everywhere and even though they are actually far more expensive than other types they are well worth the cost.

Cathy - who now has presentable finger nails


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RE: On Gardening Gloves

I laughed about the last poster's sign off - "who now has presentable finger nails" so true, so true. In fact my nails got so presentable I wore all the way through the fingertips of my gloves. I think I paid $12 a couple years ago for them - they were great because your hands don't sweat - and the gloves don't end up stinky if they've gotten wet. But - to save a couple bucks I now wear disposable kitchen gloves for $1/pr from the dollar store and who cares if the fingertips go. good post Violet!


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RE: On Gardening Gloves

I have small hands, so even if I lucked out and actually found a place that carried small ladies garden gloves they were still too big for me till the original standard blue or green atlas glove came out, I could have been a spokes person too, but i am like katy, and now prefer the thinner ones too. They are so close to no glove at all when it comes to dexterity. I also love the disposable nitrite (latex free) gloves. Now if i can ever find shoes to protect my feet with out rubber Ill have it made lol
laurie


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RE: On Gardening Gloves

FarmTek sells them for $7.95 a dozen. I bought two dozen after spending $6 for one pair at the garden center. Love these gloves.

Here is a link that might be useful: FarmTek


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RE: On Gardening Gloves

In Bellingham I get my Atlas Gloves at Redden Marine Supply (which is funny because I know nothing about boats).

If any of you locals Bellinghamsters read this forum, it might help. The 370s really are better for the summer!

Here is a link that might be useful: Atlas Gloves at Redden (Bellingham, WA)


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RE: On Gardening Gloves

  • Posted by CathyJ USDA-8 West WA (My Page) on
    Sat, Sep 11, 04 at 23:10

If, like me, you are a fan of the Atlas gloves discussed above, you will love the new Atlas NT370s. If you are not a fan, you may find that you also like them. They are made of Nitrile, the same substance of which many surgical gloves are made.

At 20 years of age, I was a bare-hands gardener. For one, I loved the feel of the dirt on my hands; plus, gloves were so awkward that I invariably ended up taking them off. As the years have progressed, however, I have tired of the ailments and incidents that come with bare hands. So, over the years, I have gone from rubber to cotton to heavy leather to goatskin to latex surgical to Nitrile surgical, the latter of which I was very content with. Then, in the spring of last year, a booth at a local gardening event was selling nothing but this one model of glove. I put one on my hand and that was it, I was sold, it was sooo comfortable. Not only were they thin and light, but the nylon knit backs were very soothing and supportive of my hands.

No, I don't work for Atlas nor any other business which sells these gloves. I am just a happy customer who wants to give the company credit for a really great product.

Cathy

Here is a link that might be useful: Atlas Nitrile Gardening Gloves


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RE: On Gardening Gloves

I'm finding the exact same design for $2.99 now in other brands. Fabulous!


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RE: On Gardening Gloves

Violet..quit FAKING IT. Pay for your ads. PHONEY!!!!

I buy my gloves at the box stores at 12 pair for 5.99.


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RE: On Gardening Gloves

Lol... yeah.. by purchasing other brands?!

Are you sure alpiner that your gloves aren't those really poorly made ones? The ones that typically look like green and yellow latex were brushed on with a cheap synthetic brush?

There can be a HUGE difference in quality. If you can provide some close up photos and a source, I'd be happy to purchase in bulk.


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RE: On Gardening Gloves

Wow, I stumbled onto my own thread. Well, it's now 2010. I'm still using Atlas nitrile coated gloves. Only now the price has come down to under $4.00 per pair depending on where you go - farm supply stores are optimum over nurseries. And now I have them in different thicknesses and different colors. I love the thermal thickness for late fall and early spring, they really do work well for keeping hands warm.

I've also found a non-atlas brand that is nitrile coated and made of bamboo fabric at Wal-Greens. I have bamboo socks and they're amazing. They take anti-microbial to a whole other level. Plus I appreciate that it's such a renewable resource.

So checking the date of the original thread, I've been using Atlas nitrile coated gloves for 7 years straight now. That's pretty good for me.

Since then I've started using Bag Balm. I put it my hands after a shower and before I leave the house. People know I garden all the time and ask how I keep such long fingernails and keep my hand from being dry and cracked. Now you know!


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