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Information on Craftsman Chainsaw 358.354830

Posted by seakaye12 (My Page) on
Fri, Feb 3, 12 at 15:44

Hi,

I have a "brand new" unused Craftsman 18" 3.7ci chainsaw. It has been stored in my garage since it was purchased new. It is several years old...but has never had fuel in it....never even fully assembled. Model #358.354830

A couple of questions:

(1) Who made these saws for Sears?
(2) As "consumer saws" go...how good or bad is this one?
(3) What would be a fair price to ask for it today?

Photobucket


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Information on Craftsman Chainsaw 358.354830

Poulan


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RE: Information on Craftsman Chainsaw 358.354830

I don't know anything about Poulan.

Craftsman mowers (especially when they used Tecumseh engines) are pretty poor quality and rather looked down upon.

In the chainsaw world...is Poulan in a similar category?

Were the older ones better or worse than what they sell today?

Thanks, Chuck


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RE: Information on Craftsman Chainsaw 358.354830

Poulan, Weedeater, Husqvarna/Craftsman tractors were all made by the company.
I'm not knowledgeable about chain saws, so you might want to search this Forum for Poulan.


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RE: Information on Craftsman Chainsaw 358.354830

Sea: I would agree with Bill in it's Origin . Although in the 80's Sears also sold Remington Saws which were rather fine saws. Today mostly Poulan are made for Sears , with Husky sold by Sears via cat'l . Since yours apparently has not been fueled you may be lucky in that the carb and diaphram are still viable (not dried out). Ensure to use some fuel treatment . I would use Lucas Top End for additional lubricity conditioner prior to usage . Also use a premium syn oil at 50:1 ratio . I do not support Poulan units currently , since the majority of todays units are rather poorly designed. However for occasional Hobby usage you should get 5-10 yrs of service . Also using winter grade (light) Bar Oil available via Walmart you may prevent any intial problems with fouling the oiling system until the saw is broken in . Have fun and let us know how things go . You most likely will have questions on the proper chain sharpening techniques . But thats another Story lol :)


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RE: Information on Craftsman Chainsaw 358.354830

Nothing wrong with that saw IMO , usually it's the owner's that kill saw or turn them into junk. I agree not compatable to mid or upper end saws due to their anti-vibration system and better bar and aggressive chains.

That saw was preserved from the factor and if stored inside reasonable controlled envoriement it will probably fire right up if you know how to prime it.

I have several polan's and if you take proper care of it it will run as long as any other brand saw. Not designed to be ran all day like th pro models and of course 1/4 the price of pro model. weakest part of that saw is the bar and chain IMO. As and entry home owner saw that's used on weekends and small jobs it can do the job. As far as price I start out around $100 bucks and see what you can get beings it's never been ran, has the owners manual and it orginal container.


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RE: Information on Craftsman Chainsaw 358.354830

On Craftsman chainsaws with auto oiler that leak after use , could I use a heaver weigth oil such as 40 weight?


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RE: Information on Craftsman Chainsaw 358.354830


I agree with ewalk and rcmoser 100 % since I have owned and used Poulans saw since the mid 70s.

1. They have performed well on their level (Poulan S225).

2. The S25 is all I needed to cut 2-4 cords yearly since mid 70s.

3. I w/n purchase the small S25 after the mid 80s vs rebuilding due to better metal vs newer plastic.
4. I have avg 10 years + before my tired PM or TX 100 deg heat cost me vs the saw failing.

5. I doubt any saw/machine/product on any level has the quality of the mid 80s and back.

6. I paid 150.-170. for the mid 70s S25, 250ish for the mid 80s S25, 50. Used for a used backup.

7. Your 3.7/18” bar is a much newer/larger saw than my 2.3cu/38cc/14” and 16” bars (toys) 30 + yrs.

8. Bar Oil: Ck the tank for a vent or open the cap to let pressure off when storing it working since seeing the info. BUT! That means you have the split tank with a gasket “maybe”. I ran a “low low” psi and soap test, tightened screws and added ext silicone and that worked. Please excuse us for jumping this post with messy bar oil matters.

Good Luck! PM is the key and some quality is not worth bringing home. I have been given too many saws/string trimmers/mowers due to too many not respecting PM or 2 Cycles. loger

PS. Can someone send me a PM if there is such that has an easy time posting open Pics vs links? I would like to share a pic of 3 cords of green oak and pecan my Poulan’s just worked for next winter.


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RE: Information on Craftsman Chainsaw 358.354830

"Were the older ones better or worse than what they sell today?"...I have two Craftsman Poulans circa late 90's. One I bought new and it has had very little use. The other was given to me so I don't know how many hours are on it. I really usually only run them twice a year, spring and fall, to keep the seals wet. I wouldn't trade either for a brand new Poulan that was manufactured recently.


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RE: Information on Craftsman Chainsaw 358.354830

Evd: 90's are still newer vintage than what Loger and I are more impressed with . As RC has stated if you only occasionally use these units and maintain them you can recieve many yrs of good service but abuse them or forget the basics of proper bar / chain and carb cleaning then you will experience 1st hand that they are not a forgiving saw. You have used good sense in starting them occassionally !


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RE: Information on Craftsman Chainsaw 358.354830

I am aware that at one time many of today's cheaper brands were condsidered commercial or professional, but still maintain that cheaper saws from a decade ago were much better than those today. It only takes the failure of one critical part to render the tool inoperable. One is much better off spending more for a saw, but it's hard to justify when the saw will only see very occasional use.


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RE: Information on Craftsman Chainsaw 358.354830

"Craftsman mowers (especially when they used Tecumseh engines)" Well I kinda dissagree the older craftsman entry mowers witht 20" blade and 3 1/2 tec engines were very good and cheap mowers. Most was run into the ground by there owners that never checked the oil or sharped blades. Let along change the oil, filter, clean the gas tank, and replae the blade. I found curb find one that somebody I don't think ever changed the oil or checked the blade. Brought it home cleaned it up (carb., Comb. chamber, spark plug, crankcase, ect... added gas and oil and it fired right up. brought new blade. Gave it to my son he abused it for 4 years, curb side trash again, got it back. cleaned it up and still runs like champ. This has been 6 years after I pulled it out of the trash. I just wish I could still buy them new with the little tec. engine on them.


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RE: Information on Craftsman Chainsaw 358.354830

Rcmoser, Why Talk About Us So Bad? LOL. I just added a tad bit of oil (vs changing) to a gift given to me about 4 yrs ago because they said the eng was locked. I feel they forgot to squeeze the kill-switch bar on the handle. The 5-6 HP never had any signs of being locked. Plus I always lower the rpm vs burning up the mulching mowers and change oil.

I find very few mowers now compared to 2-3 years ago and back. I specifically looked for one while walking my 2 mi 5 days for a kill switch cable my neighbor's dog damage. Finally, I was asked if I was still looking and was given a mower a neighbor had put on the curb thinking it had a thrown rod. I asked for just the cable and he insisted I could have the complete mower that might be good.

My nature is to check fire/fuel/compression on engines "Period". Having all, the mistake was seeing if it would start w/o the kill-cable or a screw driver to ground it after it started 1st pull. Donated it to a friend that takes all to use or scrap and he has not stopped bragging on how good the mower runs. The orig owner lived in a Duplex with only a spot to cut in back/front which means it had little use in the 2-3 years. loger


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RE: Information on Craftsman Chainsaw 358.354830

Another good annual 2-3 cord harvest of green Oak and Pecan (2012 as in 2010), cut/split/stacked all cut w mid 1980s Poulan S25 16" Bar. Some wood was 24-36" Dia, above my promised 12" Dia but a friend shared the labor for the use of the splitter. See the link below:

http://i1019.photobucket.com/albums/af312/JOW_06/SplittingStacking3HrsBasicallyFilledRacksTodayR.jpg

PS. The splitter worked about 4 cords of the large wood (shorter straight splitting/force) after the 2nd rebuild with a filter added. loger


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RE: Information on Craftsman Chainsaw 358.354830

"I paid 150.-170. for the mid 70s S25, 250ish for the mid 80s S25"...If I understand you correctly, accounting for inflation, it would take approximaly $600. today to buy what $150. bought in 1975 and $500. to buy what $250. bought in 1985.


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RE: Information on Craftsman Chainsaw 358.354830

IMO! Low to mid range saws are adjusting qualities as metal to plastic and etc to adjust to the competition and economy. I still feel some of the saws are good for their design/purpose. The math is as you see it. I have been out of the market of a purchase and newer saw's use too long to be 100% fair vs talking. loger


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RE: Information on Craftsman Chainsaw 358.354830

Just for the heck of it I downloaded a manual for the saw pictured by the OP. I couldn't put a date on it, but the manual specifies that one should use a 16:1 mixture which would make it much older than "several" years. I'd guess it dates from the 80's.


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RE: Information on Craftsman Chainsaw 358.354830

"I doubt any saw/machine/product on any level has the quality of the mid 80s and back."...Not to start an arguement, but I respectfully disagree with you. I believe many products made today are superior to those from the 50's, 60's, 70's and 80's. Horror-of-horrors, some are even made in China.


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RE: Information on Craftsman Chainsaw 358.354830

I agree that technology has improved A LOT! As no points/plugs to change regular. BUT! If you have worked combustion engines from the 60s to know I think you would have a feel of my point. Equipment on all levels are not built to last these days vs replace when worn. With the past skills/qualites not being taught/known or respected I feel this is a balance with today’s economics. Peace! loger


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RE: Information on Craftsman Chainsaw 358.354830

Within the merits of Poulan chainsaws today vs within the 70's there are no comparision. Back in the day Poulan produced Professional Grade saws. As for other Manufacturers most produced much heavier and cumbersome units back in the day . I agree with Loger that they were built to last rather than what todays unit life can be expected. However if you shell out the $$ for a Professional Grade Saw you can recieve a very fine unit . It's the cheaper Homeowner units that seem to be causing the raised eyebrows and frustration . Especially with the Epa Carbs and Corn Fuel lol .


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RE: Information on Craftsman Chainsaw 358.354830

"However if you shell out the $$ for a Professional Grade Saw you can recieve a very fine unit."...As I pointed out previously, Loger did shell out for a professional grade saw. He just did it 25 or 35 years ago. At least for me $600. means a lot less to me today than $150. did in 1975.


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RE: Information on Craftsman Chainsaw 358.354830

I take full responsibility for my two "mid grade Poulans' S-25 failing".

1. I never looked at saws above "mid level" with 16" bars knowing my needs after lugging a Homelite as large as mower as a starter. Seeing/using a friend S-25 with a 16" bar was a sale (because I had used a Homelite on that level (vs knowing of Steil and etc in the mid 70s).

2. I feel the 1st saw failed possibly due to my lack of PM but mainly loaning the saw w/o being present. Small engines should be as I treat my PC (No Wife Or Grand Etc on it vs "Just Me" and they have theirs. LOL. Long story short! I sent my premix that he d/n use vs his straight fuel, knowing better. If I was saved it was because his fuel had sat over a year. I pull the muffler and cyl/rings/piston looked OK. His Pay Back, was he loaned his new saw and it came back disassembled by his non-mechanical friend. It was a good and bad experience for his son to be present.

I feel my lack of PM and him not using a pre-mix could have cause a wrist pin keeper to come out and ruin the cyl 8-10 yrs later?

3. I ran my mid 80s saw in too much heat 100 +, lack of proper mix possibly and lack of PM caused it to get too hot to hold too many times before the rings and piston failed after 10 + yrs. I got 10 + on a piston ring kit installed. It's presently retired and probably will be a parts saw, running but too many needs (piston/rings/cyl/rod etc). loger


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RE: Information on Craftsman Chainsaw 358.354830

Evd: Rather confused as to what your point is ? 25 - 35 yrs is excellent service regardless of the price . P.S. 16:1 Oil Ratio is 1960's Vintage Mix Ratio fyi . 24:1 or 32:1 was the norm within the 70's to early 80's within Chain Saw Realm . Anyway I think we have answered your question as originally stated within servicability of older versus newer Poulan Saws. Anything newer than mid 80's has questionable quality within Poulan for any serious saw user .


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RE: Information on Craftsman Chainsaw 358.354830

"Evd: Rather confused as to what your point is ?"...My point was that Poulan saws cost $150. in 1975 and they cost $150. today so they are now at a completely different price point. The Poulan's that Loger talked about should really be compared to something like today's Stihl 260. Interesting, if you are correct then the saw the the OP pictured is a 60's vintage model.


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RE: Information on Craftsman Chainsaw 358.354830

Evd: I agree 100% with the 70's Vintage Poulan being comparible to todays Pro-Series Stihl or Husky . They had Magnesium Crank cases and Chromium Rings and or Plated Cylinders . As for the Original P Series of saw I rather doubt it is any older than mid 80's perhaps 83 at it's earliest due to the illustration of a chainbrake within the owners manual . 32:1 oil ratio would be most common although within the late 80's 40:1 ratio became the norm due to better oil technology . I did not notice any recommendation of oil ratio within any of the thread other than my original recommendation of 50:1 with todays Syn Grade "Premium Oil" I currently use Amsoil at 50:1 on 1960 Vintage Pioneers that run better now than they did back in the day lol . P.S. I also run old and new outboards at 70:1 with the same oil , but thats another story :)


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RE: Information on Craftsman Chainsaw 358.354830

The owner's manual for the saw pictured by the OP definitely specifies a 16:1 mixture. That saw has no chainbrake only a handguard which has not been installed on the saw pictured.


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RE: Information on Craftsman Chainsaw 358.354830

Oh , I see that you mentioned downloading a copy of the Op's Saw previously . My Bad ! Further review of the illustrated Chain Guard on the 1st page of the owners manual would seem to verify your asertion . 16:1 is rather rich oil mixture for anything within the last decade or two . As I said it was a normal 60's vintage ratio , but I do not recall any saws having chain guards that far back . in the late 70's to early 80's perhaps. Perhaps Chuck can lend some further light since were only speculating lol .


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RE: Information on Craftsman Chainsaw 358.354830

Both my mid 70s and 80s Poulan S-25's had optional hand guards to be added. I possibly purchased the mid 70s but 80s came with the saw (due to discontinued use on both from 70s experience I'm not recalling). Both use 16:1 as I still use due to my limited use and "Old School" lack of knowledge/experience. I wish the monsters had primer bulbs but I take the time to prime (with an eye-dropper from tank's mix) to save 2-3 extra pulls. My shoulder and arm appreciates this. LOL.

What is our point in this thread now? I have gotten lost!! loger


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RE: Information on Craftsman Chainsaw 358.354830

I have the black 3.7 with 24" blade. picked it in 1996 and had it rebuilt 2 time due operator error and that is never used sears 2 cycle oil.

if you still have write me and if not you just lost a great saw.

ktoffour@msn.com


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RE: Information on Craftsman Chainsaw 358.354830

Thats what I thought Loger . Back in the 60's they never thought of vabration dampening (even foam) on the handle bar lol . Remington which was the 1st generation of Poulan did supply nerf scabbardes such as is illustrated more from hand protection that kick back protection. As for the 16:1 I would suggest you you discontinue and utilize 32:1 if 40:1 keeps you awake at night . 16:1 ratio's with todays oils are a waste and as you know could cause carbon issues long term . Although if you use commercial fuel treatment $$ you will reduce the bother of decarbonizing which was an annual tradition back in the day . Muffler screens and ring and head were manually cleaned usually once a yr for commercial cutters. I supose with syn oils the carbon would also be greatly reduced but still the saws would produce excessive smoking and greater plug fouling over time . Anyhow my estimation is for mid 80's Vintage on Chucks unit . Happy to hear you old Poluans are still servicing your requirements , signs of quality care.


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RE: Information on Craftsman Chainsaw 358.354830

Thanks ewalk! I will continue the 16:1 that I am not having any carbon issues with and I do use StaBil with all of my 2-cycle mix. I will always question not enough oil mix or too much TX 100 + degree heat contributing to the two Poulan S-25s that failed.

1. With over 10 yrs on the saws "I D/N Cry", rebuilt the 2nd and possibly will rebuild it again if I need it.
2. My objective now is to works mornings only if needed when the temp is above 70 and pay att to heat feel.
3. I attempted to use a friend�s Poulan M# 1950 or above yesterday only to have to use my S25 to do his job. He thought he had a bad primer bulb that I by passed to find all of his fuel lines were bad after finding an empty tank. He had no idea about using Stabil or etc to help the lines. His Poulan looks as Sears 33-35 CC.
4. I would think the new plastic housing advantage over the metal would be solid plastic fuel and bar oil tanks vs split with a gasket that easily leaks bar oil. Plus, too much work to change gaskets but silicon and more torque has worked. LOL!

loger


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