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What Old Small Chain Saws Had Bar Oil Metering Screws

Posted by loger (My Page) on
Wed, Nov 16, 11 at 14:12

What Old Small Chain Saws Had Bar Oil Metering Screws (Homelite or McCulloch
maybe)? A saw is missing the screw and the oil pours out.

1. If you have any links or pics please share. I tried to simply drop a smaller screw into the port to reduce the flow w/o success.

2. I'll hope to post Pics, name and number when the saw comes in again. The carb and wire mesh air filters are below your accelerating hand. The choke is on the right side below the accelerating hand.

3. Without the metering screw, which I feel is pointed as a crab's metering screw, I'll try reducing outlet port.

Thanks! loger


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: What Old Small Chain Saws Had Bar Oil Metering Screws

Loger the majority of metering (adjustible) oiler systems were supplied by a oil line . I would restrict the outlet of the line to the oiler discharge orifice which could be done in various ways. Last but not least you could reduce the size of the discharge port with liquid metal etc and drill a very fine hole for req'd oil flow. Be sure to have oil filter inplace otherwise the dirt will surely plug your new hole . I would again advise you use winter grade bar oil which has a very thin viscosity .:)


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RE: What Old Small Chain Saws Had Bar Oil Metering Screws

Thanks Ewalk! I wish I had thought of reducing the port before now vs finding the missing metering screw. This task would have been over and something my friend can do. Remember, in North TX we d/n cut wood when it is below 50 degrees. LOL. Medium wt bar oil has always work well. I doubt I have seen different wts vs additives in brand names.

If we can get his other saw going it will be great because they have 2-3 stoves inside the home and use them. Thinking about that matter, I remember seeing water etc in small drops blended into his contaminated gas (a first vs larger collections of water toward the bottom). I possibly d/n get it out of the system completely but felt it s/h fired on the good prime.

Are the White Fish what we call White Bass or Sand Bass here (with the stripes and fighters) ? loger


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RE: What Old Small Chain Saws Had Bar Oil Metering Screws

I have traced the small chainsaw as being a MCCULLOCH Eager Beaver or Mac 100 series due to the MCCULLOCH 216905 Air Filter it uses (that will show if you search, MCCULLOCH 216905. One complaint was that the saw's oil tank will siphon itself dry while not in use. This leads me to think the missing metering screw (I am calling it) is probably a stop also or only. I know the feeling due to my 2 Poulan S25's oily mess in their cases. This means reducing the outlet w/n be a total or good solution but I feel it will help due to the excessive oil the saw was releasing. The search for the screw is still on. Please Help If You Know Of Info Or Source! loger


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RE: What Old Small Chain Saws Had Bar Oil Metering Screws

Loger: The metering screw in most units is an actuall go no go metering screw . Most saws I have or repaired have problems with residual leak by during storage . I usually place an absorbant cloth under the front portion of my Husky , Stihl and Pioneer saws. In severe cases draining of the system is the only solution. I would be surprised if Walmart does not have Winter Grade Bar Oil available even in Texas . As for Whitefish they are very close to Lake Herring in description . They are predominantly a bottom feeder that are found in deeper water (50-100 ') in large schools of up 50 fish . In our Region of Northern Ontario most larger inland lakes allow dip netting during the 1st part of November . Good Luck within your search Ebay is normally the fastest , unless you have a backyard mechanic who hoards older saw parts locally lol . :)


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RE: What Old Small Chain Saws Had Bar Oil Metering Screws

I have a McCulloch 3512 and it leaks bar oil through a hole that looks like an overflow or bleeder port in the case located at the right-front-bottom of the case. There is a clean hole in the plastic with some sort of metal sleeve inside the hole. Will try and post a pic. But the oil just POURS out when I tip the saw to the front and right. Do I have something clogged in the bar oil delivery system? Or is there something that is supposed to go into the hole that may have fallen out? I don't recall this happening when I used the saw last year.


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RE: What Old Small Chain Saws Had Bar Oil Metering Screws

I haven't seen to many old chain saws (none)that didn't leak/drip all the bar oil out when in storage, I just drain them to save the oil and them mess.


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RE: What Old Small Chain Saws Had Bar Oil Metering Screws

Your Questions & Comments:

"There is a clean hole in the plastic with some sort of metal sleeve inside the hole. Will try and post a pic. But the oil just POURS out when I tip the saw to the front and right. Do I have something clogged in the bar oil delivery system? Or is there something that is supposed to go into the hole that may have fallen out?"

My Reply:

1. If there is a clean hole, I feel something is missing. Maybe a bolt since it has a steel sleeve. A Dick Bill to let air in vs a vacuum occurring and not allowing oil out (check a part's diagram/list). My saw has a cotter pin in that breather hole.

2. Please get a pic posted, as my attachment will show the cotter on my 80s saw. I feel my saw leaks a small amount at the port. The old saw's 2-part aluminum oil case is a source for a leak (marked) that torquing and ext silicone and removing oil helps vs the Real Job of replacing the gasket.

3. Check the oil delivery at the port supplying oil to the bar. If it is clogged and not flowing free, it could be influencing more oil to come out the other hole due to pressure being pumped into the oil tank.

Good Luck!

PS. My Intention Is Sharing Only If It Comes over Different.


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RE: What Old Small Chain Saws Had Bar Oil Metering Screws

Loger:

Thanks for the pic. I can't tell whether it is in the same spot as mine. Take a look at my pic. BTW, this weekend I put a machine screw into the hole and it threaded into the sleeve like a glove. Wonder if there was some kind of adjustment/bleeder screw that went there. Unfortunately I have not been able to find a parts blowout that shows that side of the saw. I was hoping that someone with a McCulloch 3516 could tell me.

Thanks,

Here is a link that might be useful: Close-up shot.


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RE: What Old Small Chain Saws Had Bar Oil Metering Screws

Photo didn't load the first time


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RE: What Old Small Chain Saws Had Bar Oil Metering Screws

Good Pic! I noticed, I needed to add the pic after my last preview then send or it was removed.

1. That appears to be an alignment pin. Check it close for threads vs sawdust.

2. Please remove the side cover, bar and chain, clean oil port area and send a pic running or just stopped.

3. I can visualize bar oil running down from the port and possibly bar oil metering screw missing.

4. What wt bar oil are you using which will affect the flow of oil?

5. Hopefully someone will send a pic of their McCulloch 3516 with this side showing and oil info.

6. Meanwhile, do you have a small engine shop in your area that might share an opinion?


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RE: What Old Small Chain Saws Had Bar Oil Metering Screws

MAC 3516 Bar Oil Leaking? This is logical info found and cleaning with covers off should reveal.

Oil is just pouring out of the fly wheel/clutch assembly. It is coming out of the edge of the wheel. The reservoir pretty much empties in minutes. Is it possible to fix? It is a buddies so I don't want to return it in this condition. What was the value of the saw originally?

This is a easy repair, your oiler line has broken right behind your oil tank. Just take off the side casing where you can touch the fllywheel and youll see the broken line. Replace it with a new fuel line of the proper size and dont forget to clean though the line filter and put it back on the end of the line.

http://www.howtomendit.com/answers.php?id=155518


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RE: What Old Small Chain Saws Had Bar Oil Metering Screws

Hi loger:

I took my entire chainsaw apart, piece by piece. The oil leak turned out to be a broken line, as you suggested in your last post. The line was broken right where it went into the oil tank. Now I have to figure out how to put the whole thing back together, especially routing all those lines. :) But it gave me a chance to really clean up the inside which was a mess. Question: The fuel lines look pretty flexible, but since I'm all they way here, shouldn't I just replace them? I also noticed that some of the screws had Loctite (white and red) on them. I would think that is important with all the vibrations involved. Lastly, I broke off one of the fan vanes on the flywheel. Is that a big problem in terms of stability? Any other suggestions?


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RE: What Old Small Chain Saws Had Bar Oil Metering Screws

1. A post that I found and listed the address to gets the credit for the bad oil line vs me.
2. Digital Camera pics before and during new jobs can save a lot of time, if "We" take Pics, w/o manuals.
3. I c/n visualize what you could have apart that w/n fall back into place once you start re-assembling.
4. You have a good point on replacing the fuel lines and take pics or make notes on line's connections.
5. If lines are not that old, fitting tight and you can stretch or pull hard on them, Cheap Me would think twice.
6. Loctite is good due to the vibs but again, that is not me and your call or others might consider it a must.
7. The covers that you removed comes off regular for cleaning vs crankcase screws that I would use LT on.
8. One broken fan vane is not an issue IMO. It will be good to get opinions of the pros on these matters.
9. I have worked on small engines since 1970 but not daily since 1990 as a pro would have to keep up.

Good find and send questions and or pics on any re-assembly matters. Flywheel torque might be 1st since I'm hearing of the break. I am surprised you had to pull the flywheel (if you did),an inch lb torque wrench or good feel will be needed.


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