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PTO clutch puller?

Posted by tomplum 7-8 (My Page) on
Sat, May 11, 13 at 10:39

Has anyone made a PTO clutch puller and would like to share their design? Anyone that has eventually had to resort to pulling knows that A) the tops of the clutch are rounded most times so a jaw puller on its own is useless and B) there isn't typically a lot of room. In my pea brain, I have this vision of using some short pieces of channel that I could articulate w/ 2 cross bolts and put a plate across using a pusher rod.


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: PTO clutch puller?

I have used a bearing splitter adapter and T-bar puller combination with success. If you can't get the bearing splitter adapter above the pulley, you can put the splitter directly into the pulley groove. I hope you are dealing with an already defective clutch as it might not look/fit the same afterward.
I remember automotive air conditioner compressors using the same genre of clutches once had 5/8" X 11 threads inside the clutch hub so you could just run a 5/8" bolt into the hole and it would push the clutch right off the compressor shaft without the need for an elaborate puller system.
Anyhow, you might be able to rent or borrow an adequately sized T-bar puller and a bearing splitter adapter from an auto parts house if any of those in your area have a tool loan practice (it's pretty commonplace around my area).
Tom, I have "rigged" (if you could call it that) another configuration of stuff on hand to remove stubborn motion drive pulleys. If you care to see that, send me an e-mail as I'm not sure which e-mail address you are currently using.


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RE: PTO clutch puller?

The illustration above by Mownie is very good but note that you need a very large bearing splitter to get behind the clutch. I could not find one even at the local rental places while I let one get away from me years ago. Pulling in the pulley is most likely to destroy it.

I had a very stubborn clutch this winter. I cut a "U" shape in a pc. of 1/2" steel plate, the plate was big enough that the sides stuck out far enough to get a large 2 jaw puller on it. Drilling holes and using the T bar and bolts would also work.

The plate needs to have a lot of metal behind the U OR the U needs to be deep enough that you can drill a hole well back to each side of the U and bolt on a re-enforcing bar across under the open end of the U. I had to grind down the inner edges of the U to maybe 3/8" to get in close to the crankshaft.

Walt Conner


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RE: PTO clutch puller?

This is what I mentioned I rigged up for a motion drive pulley.
I utilized a couple vise grips to hold the stiffener plate in case the big plate with the cut out wanted to deflect any under the load.
As Walt pointed out, you can drill a hole in each plate and use nuts/bolts instead of vise grips, but this worked quite well.


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RE: PTO clutch puller?

withdrawn...

This post was edited by justalurker on Sun, May 12, 13 at 20:59


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RE: PTO clutch puller?

The "U" plate seems to be a good idea and will work for some, though I think that I also need to cut or weld up something like heavy angle or channel to actually grab the edge in those applications to where there isn't room above the clutch. My jaw pullers do not have the inward reach, grip or way to steady the jaws on the clutches w/ the rounded edge top. I must be getting just to old and ornery to want to take these things off the hard way anymore! I didn't get very far this weekend. I appreciate the ideas and will keep you posted. Keep the cards and letters comin'.


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RE: PTO clutch puller?

For my homework tonight I made a "U" plate out of some 1/4" plate that I had. It is 4 1/4" X 9". Hopefully it will allow me to get up above the clutch when I need to in these nicely wide open spaces. It got a tapped 3/8" hole on either side which hopefully will allow me to use it to push or pull the clutch off. I can see the thing being a little beefier. Maybe it will be a tool. Maybe a prototype... Maybe scrap... I still want to visit the metal yard grab a heavy round plate and some channel to fashion a jaw puller. I've got 3" and 12" channel and not a thing in between.


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RE: PTO clutch puller?

Some pictures as soon as you can please :^)


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RE: PTO clutch puller?

Here is the original design- plate part anyways. The slot is 1 7/16" As it is, it fits under the belly of MTD units I've tried and over the driven pulley. I'll nip the corners off for a little better maneuverability. I was hoping to have the jaw puller made, but ...


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RE: PTO clutch puller?

Still no jaw puller, but other puller porn. This was one of my Rustoleum Hammered projects.


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RE: PTO clutch puller?

Whoo hoo Tom!!! Atta boy!
Clever recycling of old mower blades. I always say "it ain't junk until I can't make something out of it".


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Tom, Mownie, and Walt

You guys are all knowledgeable, so what about this?

Might it be worthwhile, when you have a fairly new machine to remove the PTO clutch, coat the shaft with anti-seize, and reinstall it?

I do that with rear wheels, hoping against hope that I don't ever need to remove 'em.


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RE: PTO clutch puller?

Well now twelveguage, I don't have a problem with an owner doing that, but how the heck do you convince someone who just bought a new mower, and especially one that is "toolbox challenged"..........that they might want to plan against something being rusted in place at some unknown point in the future.

Now, if you fall into the category of person who is not shy about (or challenged by) working on your stuff, I recommend that it would not be a total waste of time to anti-seize several areas of the tractor.

But if Tom and I have pullers........well at least WE are prepared (somewhat), and can say "bring it on".


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RE: PTO clutch puller?

I switched the outside bar of the wheel puller to a drawbar that wouldn't get all stressed. The Deere blade centers fit nicely over it. I tacked inna coupla pegs just in case. One is a 5/8", the other is for the 3/4" 12, anti sneeze is a foreign concept to some manufacturers. On your equipment, it is a great idea. I could probably remove a drive pulley on a 1995 MTD, but a 2005- doubtful. Specs changed on something and on 3 out of 4- they don't come off. PTO's fortunately usually do.


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RE: PTO clutch puller?

Great post and just what I was searching for as I have been struggling with an electric PTO on a Troy Bilt (real Garden Way) tractor. What makes matters worse is there is no hole in the engine mounting plate for the PTO, so the removal process needs to be done on the machine.


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RE: PTO clutch puller?

I'd best get to work on my jaw puller. Had another today. I would have at least liked the opportunity to put pressure on the clutch and rattle it up. My plate is a no go on these. Welded locator on the back of the clutch and axle bracket on the front. Traction belts on GT245's are so much more of pain when the clutch won't come off. (Sigh)


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RE: PTO clutch puller?

At this point I can say that the pusher/ puller is not as successful as desired. It seems that i have more issues w/ the Cub product that I tailored it more to fit. I had yet another that the clutch had to come off in pieces. Though I could put downward force with the pusher and additional force -it wasn't enough. Some Cub pans are stamped more contoured rather than flat- so it couldn't deliver as the pusher rods couldn't hold perpendicular . Maybe I need a top plate to push against . Basically the big diamond shaped plate is threaded so the rods can push the top of the clutch. This hopefully takes some pressure off the clutch mounting bolt that the bottom strap pushes against. The last one i soaked w/ penetrant , put all the pressure the 1/2 " rods could and hit it w/ an air hammer. Anyone have a suggestion on how to improve this?


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RE: PTO clutch puller?

another view


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RE: PTO clutch puller?

Tom, you do realize that by using the chassis pan as a "pusher" base that you are actually putting all the "pulling forces" on the engine sump and lower crankshaft bearing??
I had to mention that because I question whether the sump will stand a lot of stress in that manner.
I think you probably ought to stay with a "puller type" design that utilizes the center end of the crankshaft as a basis for pulling forces. That way, all the stress is confined to the rigid PTO end of the crankshaft instead of being borne by the sump.
I'm thinking that pulling against the sump like your present design seems to do could at least bend or crack the sump casting.
It seems to me that you could modify your present design so that a single, large, center mounted pusher bolt could bear against the end of the crankshaft to generate the kind of pulling force needed to move the clutch.
You could still use long bolts to hold the puller bar onto the clutch adapter plate (diamond with U cut out).
You would likely need for the puller bar to be made of much heavier material though (maybe 5/8" to 3/4" thick).


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RE: PTO clutch puller?

Yes, I had considered that. The goal was to be a helper to the small clutch bolts. Most are 7/16 or there abouts.The style w/ the double D washer built in rarely come out. The upper plate has a challenge being thicker in these apps, but you are correct that the lower should be heavier than 3/8". Maybe I need to be all the beefier all around. The rods are just 1/2 #2 for the initial design and I hadn't attempted to harden any of it. It is just freaking amazing to me that a roller bearing can be that rusted on! I might feel better getting some longer crank bolts to use rather than the supplied attachment bolt.


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RE: PTO clutch puller?

As tough as bearing removal can be, I would use something on the order of a 3/4" fine thread pusher bolt against the end of the crankshaft to do the actual push work.
To protect the end of the crankshaft, I would fashion a short (about 1" long) 7/16" bolt with a shallow countersink bored into the center of the bolt hex head, and thread that bolt into the crankshaft with a couple of flat washers under the head.
The 3/4" pusher bolt needs to have a cone shaped taper so it can locate into the countersink of the 7/16" bolt head.
Basically, the short 7/16" bolt would protect the end of the crankshaft from being damaged by the pusher bolt.
The 3/4" pusher bolt would have plenty of "muscle" to draw on the clutch.


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RE: PTO clutch puller?

Now we're talkin' !


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RE: PTO clutch puller?

You should probably be able to adapt a ready made T-bar puller (slotted bar with big pusher bolt in center) to the clutch adapter plate you have fabricated.
Doing so would be faster (and a bit more versatile) than making your own "purpose built" pusher bar.
Another benefit of using a ready made one is that the actual pusher bolt will likely have a low friction cone insert in the end to engage the dimple of the crankshaft protection bolt.
I strongly suggest using a protection bolt as described because simply engaging the end of a pusher bolt directly to the threaded hole in the crankshaft center is to risk swelling the crank diameter or "boogering" the threads (or both) if the bearing is stuck "like a bear".
Sometimes a ready made T-bar puller comes with a variety of low friction tips to rest against different types of shaft ends.
If the kit comes with a "flat end" type of tip (non conical shape) you can forgo the protection bolt arrangement and place the flat tip right onto the end of the crank.


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RE: PTO clutch puller?

I looked for a T bar that would be wide enough , but didn't come across one. Feel free to provide a link :) In other news, took off the toughest wheel ever with my wheel puller yesterday. Had me wondering what parts were gonna bust first as the impact was pounding away .A lovely MTD double D shaft was a formidable opponent - but we won!


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RE: PTO clutch puller?

Search using Owatonna Tool Company puller Model 522 as the subject.
I have no experience with the company the link takes you to, so don't consider it as an endorsement by me.
That just had the best stated price of several sites I visited.
Heck, even Sears features the tool, and that surprised me.
This puller ought to have enough "spread" (at 7-3/4") to reach beyond the OD of the clutch to engage to your adapter plate.
And it has a 3/4" X 16 (fine thread) pusher bolt.

Here is a link that might be useful: example puller


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RE: PTO clutch puller?

Somehow I see a plethora of OTC pullers that I didn't know existed.before. The one above is about perfect w/ the puller plate. They make a larger (and heavier as well) version. I don't recall seeing one w/ the cross strap that holds the jaws together before. I might need one of those too. Learn something new everyday. . .


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RE: PTO clutch puller?

Here's an upgrade (hopefully) to the PTO puller. The biggest challenge will be fitting the jaws in those tight places. Will update- certainly a work in progress.


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RE: PTO clutch puller??

My neighbor gave me one of those Mr Goodplier's 2 ton jacks from Shucks when he left. Considering tossing it , I thought I may be able to add the cylinder to my wheel puller. I did. It could have advantages over the push bolt that can be a consumable if you have to push too hard. If I were smarter, I probably should have used Acme thread. Does it work? I dunno.


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