Return to the Trees Forum | Post a Follow-Up

 o
Black Walnut Root Reach

Posted by whaas 5a SE WI (My Page) on
Sat, Jan 4, 14 at 11:04

I talked my neighbor into letting me remove a 6' Black Walnut about 10' off the lot line.

It appears there is another one growing about 40' off the lot line that looks to be about 10' tall.

Since I'm likely staying here for the long haul is there any risk/concern with the black walnut 40' away from my garden beds? There are mainly multiple species of spruce, pine and fir closest to the lot line.

I understand the spread of roots just curious what folks thoughts/experiences are with garden beds being that far away yet possibly being effected by mature black walnuts.


Follow-Up Postings:

 o
RE: Black Walnut Root Reach

I thought that most of the juglone problems arose from foliage, stems and husks, not roots. Will the predominant wind blow debris toward your garden?

I'd say that a 10' tree 40' distant means no problems for a long time.

Also for the long haul, keep a sharp eye as the tree rats will help them spread!

hortster


 o
RE: Black Walnut Root Reach

  • Posted by whaas 5a SE WI (My Page) on
    Sat, Jan 4, 14 at 12:49

Don't know much about juglone and how its spread but could certainly research a bit more. Its fairly open around here so don't think there will be much issue with leaf debris until my garden really fills in. At that point winds from the east/southeast would be needed to get them in my yard. Can't recall what the predominant fall winds are.

I'm thinking there won't be an issue for long time either. Being inside during this cold winter keeps me thinking, lol.


 o
RE: Black Walnut Root Reach

"Being inside during this cold winter keeps me thinking, lol. "

Ain't that the truth!

Hope the kids are better today =)


 o
RE: Black Walnut Root Reach

  • Posted by whaas 5a SE WI (My Page) on
    Sat, Jan 4, 14 at 13:14

Hey Jon, as a matter of fact they are! Thanks for the comment.

My 4 month old had a double ear infection and had three rounds of anitbiotics. The third type worked, which was a relief.


 o
RE: Black Walnut Root Reach

In reality, predominant wind directions are of little meaning in such situations. All it takes is one good day of S.E. wind, not weeks and weeks of it, to propel such material hither and yon. But very basically, one in the N. hemisphere can expect SE winds to occur ahead of cold fronts and low pressure systems, on the "front side", so to speak. Air tries to rush into a low pressure center but because of the earth's spin, it ends up circling around in a vortex. One can literally follow a storm system's progress and location simply by noting wind direction and changes in same.

+oM


 o
RE: Black Walnut Root Reach

The roots of a black walnut contain juglone just like the other parts of the tree. In fact, the concentration is higher in the roots than it is in the leaves. Both live and dead roots exude juglone. When other plant roots grow near black walnut tree roots, they can be affected by juglone in the soil near the black walnut roots.


 o
RE: Black Walnut Root Reach

  • Posted by bboy USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA (My Page) on
    Sat, Jan 4, 14 at 16:14

Black walnut makes a big tree and the roots should be expected to extend well beyond the branches, same as with other kinds of trees.


 o
RE: Black Walnut Root Reach

Brandon7 is correct on this one. Black Walnut roots are the most serious source of juglone which suppresses growth of tomatoes, potatoes, and many other garden veggies. The rule of thumb is that the roots spread twice as far from the trunk as the tree is tall.

http://ohioline.osu.edu/hyg-fact/1000/1148.html


 o
RE: Black Walnut Root Reach

  • Posted by whaas 5a SE WI (My Page) on
    Sat, Jan 4, 14 at 21:05

Picea pungens, Picea omorika, Pinus Cembra, Abies koreana and Cornus alternifolia are the main speces closest to the lot line.

Thanks for the link, OSU states the toxic zone is between 50 and 80'.

Not liking my odds here as three of the plants listed above are screening plants. May need to do a bit of research to see how these plants do with black walnut.


 o
RE: Black Walnut Root Reach

The Abies is the only one I'd worry about if I was planting a new tree in the root zone of the walnut. Since your tree will be well established by the time any roots get there you shouldn't have an issue. I put young P. cembra and Picea omorika (among others) in the root zone of a well established BW without any problems.

tj


 o Post a Follow-Up

Please Note: Only registered members are able to post messages to this forum.

    If you are a member, please log in.

    If you aren't yet a member, join now!


Return to the Trees Forum

Information about Posting

  • You must be logged in to post a message. Once you are logged in, a posting window will appear at the bottom of the messages. If you are not a member, please register for an account.
  • Please review our Rules of Play before posting.
  • Posting is a two-step process. Once you have composed your message, you will be taken to the preview page. You will then have a chance to review your post, make changes and upload photos.
  • After posting your message, you may need to refresh the forum page in order to see it.
  • Before posting copyrighted material, please read about Copyright and Fair Use.
  • We have a strict no-advertising policy!
  • If you would like to practice posting or uploading photos, please visit our Test forum.
  • If you need assistance, please Contact Us and we will be happy to help.


Learn more about in-text links on this page here