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Pink early spring bloom tree

Posted by knuttle z7bnc (My Page) on
Wed, Feb 27, 13 at 16:23

If I knew more about this pink tree that is first to bloom in the spring in the area east of Raleigh North Carolina, I would be buying it rather than posting here.

This is our second spring in our home about 20 miles east of Raleigh NC, and would like one of these trees for our yard. It is the first to bloom in the spring (early February) and we would like the early spring color in our yard. The tree has sort of a dusky pink flower, and while some specimens are definitely trees, some appear to be large bushes. The ones that are bushes appear to be older as they frequently are seen in old home sites.

From this brief description, does anyone have any idea what these trees are?

They are not Kwanzan or Yoshino cherries.


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Pink early spring bloom tree

deep pink.. tiny flowers.. attached to branches.. try redbud

see link

wayyyy .. wayyy earlier than cherry

ken

Here is a link that might be useful: link


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RE: Pink early spring bloom tree

Can you post photos? Around here redbuds bloom after many flowering cherries and most certainly not in February so I'd hesitate to suggest those.

The earliest flowering trees here are the flowering cherry Prunus subhirtella 'Autumnalis', which is in full bloom at this time. The other very early bloomers that could fit your description are Prunus mume or flowering apricot and some old fashioned varieties of flowering quince. Both of these are far more shrubby than tree-like although the apricot can develop into a small tree.


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RE: Pink early spring bloom tree

Probably non-native cherry such as 'Okame'. Blooming now all over the place in Atlanta. Redbud hasn't even started.

Here is a link that might be useful: classic picture of it

This post was edited by esh_ga on Wed, Feb 27, 13 at 18:20


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RE: Pink early spring bloom tree

do you guys grow the eastern redbud i do??? does it matter with flowering time????

Cercis canadensis???

cant wait for the OP to tell us who is right.. lol ..

ken


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RE: Pink early spring bloom tree

Idk Ken, knuttle strikes me as the kind of arbor enthusiast that would know what a redbud is.

Some kind of quince was my first thought. They flower about the same time as forsythia around here, before ornamental cherries (at least the ones people plant around here w/ yoshino and okame the most common) and redbuds. Obviously, they are among our earliest flowering shrubs locally besides witchhazel.

It would be interesting to know if the plant in question is seen blooming in the wild or solely in landscaped areas.

John


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RE: Pink early spring bloom tree

"Early February" and pink flowers says Flowering Apricot to me. You can't miss the fragrance which is outstanding. Search Prunus mume and compare with this link.

Here is a link that might be useful: Bernheim's Flowering Apricot


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RE: Pink early spring bloom tree

The ones that are bushes appear to be older as they frequently are seen in old home sites.

That part sounds like flowering quince.

Here is a link that might be useful: Flowering quince picture


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RE: Pink early spring bloom tree

  • Posted by jqpublic 7b/8a Wake County NC (My Page) on
    Thu, Feb 28, 13 at 0:06

some sort of cherry i believe. redbuds definitely don't bloom here until after bradford pears, and the bradford pears are no where near blooming.

there are several non-native cherries blooming in my neighborhood. They have been blooming on an office since december. they tend to readily break dormancy throughout the winter

This post was edited by jqpublic on Thu, Feb 28, 13 at 0:08


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RE: Pink early spring bloom tree

  • Posted by bboy USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA (My Page) on
    Thu, Feb 28, 13 at 0:42

The more prevalent winter cherry in the US is 'Autumnalis Rosea'. Less showy 'Autumalis' is not seen much over here. And yes, these are two distinctly different varieties, with their own characteristics.


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RE: Pink early spring bloom tree

knuttle, I am now living in your same general area and the Prunus mume trees are in glorious, peak bloom this week. Have you noted the interesting, bonsai-type shapes that the mature trees form? A choice tree best highlighted as a specimen in the landscape but also often seen planted in straight rows by developers to accent property lines. Cuttings root easily. Really the perfect small tree for the average suburban yard in Zones 7-9.


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RE: Pink early spring bloom tree

For those of you suggesting Prunus mume instead of Prunus 'Okame' (which is a hybrid not related to Prunus mume), how do you distinguish the difference between the two from a distance? Is it habit/shape? Color of flower?


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RE: Pink early spring bloom tree

  • Posted by bboy USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA (My Page) on
    Thu, Feb 28, 13 at 14:19

'Okame' is denser and produces red calyces which give it a rusty appearance in flower, when seen from some distance. Japanese apricot has an open habit with long, straight shoots.


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RE: Pink early spring bloom tree

Do you know how hard it is to get you, your camera and the tree all in the same area at the same time? Here are pictures of the tree that I was talking about. It has been in bloom for at least two weeks now.

As someone surmised I am an armature gardener and know of redbud, Quince, etc. In fact we got a hybrid orange quince last year at the NC garden show at the arboretum. We are trying to get a lot of flowering bushes and trees in the yard. You can only have so many azaleas and camellias.

nandina: Has the tree Prunus mume been in the are long enough that it has become "feral" in some abandon home sites and old business? Western Johnston Co NC. Do you know any nurseries in the area that care them


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RE: Pink early spring bloom tree

Noticed the pink showing on some 'flowering cherries' - I have no idea what species or variety - on my way to work this morning. Not yet in bloom, but not far off from it.
Redbuds/callery pears nowhere near showing any color


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RE: Pink early spring bloom tree

nandina: Wife's question.

You said they root easily. Do you root them in soil or water.

As if we need more plants rooting around our house, I don't know how many gardenias we have.


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RE: Pink early spring bloom tree

Love pink blooms in spring! If your looking for a beautiful Pink flowering tree look up Kwanzan Flowering Cherry. I have 2 beautiful Kwanzan Cherry trees in our front yard and I love them! They are so beautiful and loaded with blooms in spring. The fall color is pretty as well, Kind of multi colored. Even the bark is beautiful.


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RE: Pink early spring bloom tree

well.. its not redbud..

but the deep red bark might have to lead you to cherry i think ... but i am guessing ...

prunus for sure ...

but i cant name it ...

too bad it wasnt de-suckered.. historically ... and i wont even mention the mulch volcano..

and yes.. i have tried taking pix at speed.. lol ...

ken


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RE: Pink early spring bloom tree

I think that it is Okame cherry (Prunus x okame).

Your pictures are "dead ringers" for this tree.

Here is a link with photos.

Here is a link that might be useful: Okame Cherry Pics


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RE: Pink early spring bloom tree

knuttle...Some interesting reading if you do a search for...who introduced Prunus mume. Will give you answers re when it was introduced into this country.

Root using softwood cuttings and rooting hormone. I have not tried rooting it in water but certainly an easy experiment to undertake. Must admit that I am a lazy propagator and mostly use the method I have posted a few times. Do a search on the Propagation Forum for "Toothpick Technique".


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RE: Pink early spring bloom tree

Yep.
I concur with Tn Tree Man.
It's an Okame cherry

They're just about week or two from blooming here in MD.


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RE: Pink early spring bloom tree

  • Posted by bboy USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA (My Page) on
    Thu, Feb 28, 13 at 23:04

Notice the red calyces I mentioned previously. There are other P. campanulata hybrids around, with similar general appearance but 'Okame' is the prevalent one.


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RE: Pink early spring bloom tree

I solved the problem of identification. This morning we were on our way to the store and passed the trees we want. They are in what I believe is an old house site. We bought some rooting hormone and on our way back we stopped and took cuttings. So we decided to go with nandina: "identification" and root the cuttings.

Thanks for all of the help.


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RE: Pink early spring bloom tree

Might not be the right time for cuttings. Prunus usu. mid-summer.


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RE: Pink early spring bloom tree

We considered that but decided the trees will always be there if these do not root. If they root we are ahead.


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RE: Pink early spring bloom tree

  • Posted by bboy USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA (My Page) on
    Wed, Mar 6, 13 at 20:23

Not likely to root now.


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RE: Pink early spring bloom tree

No need to expend the energy until they are ready to go. Your hormone won't go bad in 3-4 months.


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RE: Pink early spring bloom tree

I think that the OP probably had Okame Cherry.
This is 'First Lady' taken today at the National Arboretum.
One of FL's parents is Okame. However FL has not been released long enough to be OP's tree.
 photo 03-24-13011.jpg


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