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pink flowering dogwood with bark splitting at base

Posted by crcash2 sc zone 7 (My Page) on
Sun, Feb 26, 12 at 20:35

I see no evidence of borer attack, but my one year old dogwood has bark peeling at the base. It looks to be in good health otherwise. What can I do to promote healing? With exposed areas what can I do to prevent insect infestation? And lastly should I be concerned since I don't really know the cause?


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: pink flowering dogwood with bark splitting at base

Crcash, can u use photobucket or the like to post a picture?

Besides that, describe the tree's history more. Did ya buy a small potted one and plant it last spring, burlap one professionally planted? That type of things. Is it Cornus Florida? Or another?

This is like the first idea Dr House has so its likely to change but is it possible we are looking at graft failure? Most pink flowered native dogwoods are a grafted variety. Just a guess. Far as what to do, trim the wound clean and spray some tree specific insecticide on/near it then hope for the best. Beware any magic goo salesmen. Tree medical care is in its infancy.


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RE: pink flowering dogwood with bark splitting at base

Without more info, and probably pictures, any answers at this point would be shots in the dark. There are multiple threads about similar topics in this forum, but all vary slightly depending on the specifics. Take some good pictures and get back to us.


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RE: pink flowering dogwood with bark splitting at base

  • Posted by j0nd03 7 west/central AR (My Page) on
    Sun, Feb 26, 12 at 21:11

Ahem, some kousa dogwoods HAVE peeling bark. It is a feature of some cultivars like 'National'

Otherwise, pic needed

John


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RE: pink flowering dogwood with bark splitting at base

Attached is a photo of the peeling bark. The tree otherwise looks very healthy. This will be the second year I've had it in the ground. Planted from container last spring.

Here is a link that might be useful: peeling bark


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RE: pink flowering dogwood with bark splitting at base

  • Posted by j0nd03 7 west/central AR (My Page) on
    Mon, Feb 27, 12 at 8:58

Lack of a trunk flare hints it was planted too deeply. A fickle tree by nature, perhaps being planted too deep exacerbated the transplant shock. Did you water it often last year? Dogwoods being the natural understory/woodland edge tree they are, need lots of water during establishment. Not to the point of making the soil soggy all the time, though. Prognosis does not look good. I would not even bother replanting this one. Look for replacement this fall and enjoy this one this year if it makes it.

John


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RE: pink flowering dogwood with bark splitting at base

That's discouraging to say the least. So, there's nothing I can do to promote healing of the bark?


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RE: pink flowering dogwood with bark splitting at base

All you can do is provide good care. Do find out how deep the root flare is though. I agree you are likely to lose this tree, but stranger things have happened. But I would be planning now for a replacement. Whatever happens, it's an excellent op to learn so that you have better chances of success next time. I myself killed a couple before I learned to deal with out clay soil, but it spurred me to learn more about soils, and now my success rate is very good.

Arktrees


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RE: pink flowering dogwood with bark splitting at base

  • Posted by j0nd03 7 west/central AR (My Page) on
    Mon, Feb 27, 12 at 9:27

crcash, I feel I should add I have not successfully grown a dogwood to date. I killed all 3 I planted last year. I changed some of my planting methods and planted another one last fall. Remember, you are not an expert until you have killed 3 (or more) of something!

John


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RE: pink flowering dogwood with bark splitting at base

You haven't been careless with a string trimmer or mower, have you? ;-)


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RE: pink flowering dogwood with bark splitting at base

No. But the area gets a lot if sun. Could it be sunscald? My hope is that it will survive an infestation and heal itself. It hasnt had an effect on the new buds. They are on every branch and look ready to bloom.


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RE: pink flowering dogwood with bark splitting at base

Nope, doesn't look like sunscald. If the other side looks anything like the side we can see, the tree's a goner. Even if the other side looks good, that tree is still in BAD shape. My recommendation would be to prune it at ground level and be done with it. Sorry for the bad news.


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RE: pink flowering dogwood with bark splitting at base

He is crcrash's pic...

Photobucket

Could be mechanical. And there is what appears to be at least the start of a root flare. Perhaps mishandled at the nursery and showing up now? Something else amiss with the roots besides planted too deep? The cracks in the bark higher up are not a good sign.

tj


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RE: pink flowering dogwood with bark splitting at base

  • Posted by j0nd03 7 west/central AR (My Page) on
    Mon, Feb 27, 12 at 21:15

The second and third pics are telepoled. Thought they were the dogwood too. I was wondering how that damage from the first pic wasn't showing up in the next two. They are different trees cash?

John


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RE: pink flowering dogwood with bark splitting at base

Actually, the cracks above the missing bark don't really mean much more, in this case. The wound is quite large and there is absolutely no vascular support for the area where the cracks occur. The area is dead and the cracks are a result of that. A lack of cracks above the large, weathered wound would only mean they hadn't showed up yet.


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RE: pink flowering dogwood with bark splitting at base

If 2/3 of the cambial tissue/bark is gone, PLANT A NEW TREE at the right depth or go to another species. Nasty. Very little chance of recovery. Geez. Why continue the misery?
hortster


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RE: pink flowering dogwood with bark splitting at base

Animals, especially hungry rabbits?


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RE: pink flowering dogwood with bark splitting at base

No I think just stress and maybe planted too deep based on the comments that I'm hearing. I have three rubra planted in a group. This is the center one. The other two only have slight damage at the base, nowhere near the damage in the picture. If I remove this tree and plant another, what would be a good selection? South Carolina, Zone 7, acidic soil in full sun.


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RE: pink flowering dogwood with bark splitting at base

If you have a group of three C. rubra you might replant the same for visual continuity, but be sure the replacement is planted and maintained correctly. Looks more like a non-parasitic type of damage vs. disease, in which case you could try again. Just curious - is that a piece of plastic cord going around the base? Girdling root? Or just a piece of wood?
hortster


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RE: pink flowering dogwood with bark splitting at base

It's a piece of bark that has not peeled all the way off. I'm guessing that dogwoods are just difficult to maintain. I will most likely let this one bloom out then do the deed when the leaves fall next winter. Sound good?


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RE: pink flowering dogwood with bark splitting at base

"Dogwoods are difficult to maintain"

That depends on where you are. We live in Eastern Carolina, and dogwoods grow like weeds. After having lived in northern Indiana it was so contrary to what I "knew" that it took several years to accept the different growing habits in the new area.


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RE: pink flowering dogwood with bark splitting at base

Dogwoods can be tough to get established, and will never be drought tolerant. However once established they can do very well in full sun, but watering the area around the tree in droughty type weather would benefit them.

I have planted several dogwoods, and I have one now. That one took 3 years before I could cut back to "normal" watering. The others I lost due to drought, and my S.O. not watering it, another to a borer, and then two were developing possible anthracnose, so I removed them as this disease has not been a problem in my area, and I did not want to be responsible for it becoming a possible problem. I examined the roots of all of them after removal of the failed plantings, the in all cases the roots had grown surprising little. Point being, they are slow to recover a full functioning root system IMHO, and will require attention for several years after planting.

Arktrees


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RE: pink flowering dogwood with bark splitting at base

based on the picture, I would have to agree that you no longer have borers, but that you once did. See those little squigglies that look like inebriated larvae fed themselves till they were fat and sassy?


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RE: pink flowering dogwood with bark splitting at base

Attached is Picture of the group of three dogwoods. The one in the center is the one with the damaged bark. My question is if I remove the center dogwood, what would be a good replacement? Should I try another rubra, or maybe some shrubbery? Or, another flowering tree that would compliment? I am in SC Zone 7 with acidic soil. The area gets lots of sun. The tree to the left is a coral bark japanese maple.

Here is a link that might be useful: dogwood grouping


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RE: pink flowering dogwood with bark splitting at base

remove it ...

who knows how long it might live.. but it will die.. sooner or later ...

the damage could have been pre-existing at purchase.. but did not manifest itself until after the stress of transplant ... or even potting or ball and burlap in the first place ...

that damage is WWWAAAYYYY!!!! beyond sunscald ... it may have been part of the equation.. but it is not the sole cause ... almost looks like a beaver came by and took a nip .. and i will presume.. that aint possible.. lol ...

boy it looks like you have a nice sized property there ...

as to your groups of 3 ... whatever ... i know the theory ... i usually ignore such ... i would have planted the three more around the yard [i have 5 acres] .. to create a backbone for the larger landscape.. rather than investing the cost of three ... in a small area ...

why are you insistent on a grouping of 3 ...

thinking outside the box you are in.. get rid of the sickly one.. and move one of the others 50 feet away .. and look for some other plants. .. to fill in around a given single plant ...???

the problem with groupings.. as you have learned.. is when one of them dies .. and then you are left with a lack of balance.. and two usually doesnt work ... so you are left with dealing with 'filling in' ... and trying again.. on what might be a plant that is hard to deal with ...

think outside your box.. and good luck

if there is any chance.. that there is a warranty involved .. exercise it ASAP ...

ken


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RE: pink flowering dogwood with bark splitting at base

Unfortunately, no warranty!
Also, All of that open field isn't my property, it is vacant lots that have yet to sell, and probably won't. The trees are actually a couple of feet off the property line. The cryptomeria you see in the back is back corner of the lot (about .5 acres total).


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