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Prunus sargentii life span

Posted by whaas 5a SE WI (My Page) on
Sat, Feb 1, 14 at 21:06

Prunus are known to have disease and pest issues thus having an impact on their life span.

I thought Prunus sargentii and Prunus maackii where the exception to the rule. I planted a P. maackii about 9 years ago and its quite stunning now. The bark is losing some of its lustre though.

Now its time to plant a P. sargentii. I stumbled across a description by the Bernheim Arb calling out its life span as 20 years. Which seemed very short lived. I few other sources called out this life span as well.

http://bernheim.org/explore/arboretum/bernheim-select/sargent-cherry/

I found a excerpt from Donald Wyman that one of the first Prunus Sargentii brought to the states was still growing at the age of 46 years old at the Arnold Arboretum. Surely I could call them up and find out when it croaked or if there is a new one growing there.

I wonder if they are shorter lived in warmer zones? Any thoughts on this?

I'm not expecting to plant a Prunus and get 60 years out of it but 20 years means its time to find another selection.

Just talking generalities here...not exact numbers.


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Prunus sargentii life span

You must have seen one you liked. ;-)

Mine was 8-10 feet tall when I bought it in spring of 2001and it shows no sign of decline. Some issues with branching structure that I missed when I got it, but otherwise its doing well.

tj


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RE: Prunus sargentii life span

  • Posted by bboy USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA (My Page) on
    Sun, Feb 2, 14 at 13:14

Sargent cherry lives long enough to get big (80' tall in the wild). Seattle arboretum plantings of this species date back as far as 1940, I haven't looked at tags of these there recently but probably the same individual(s) are still present (as recently as 2005 at least 17 examples were in the collections there).


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RE: Prunus sargentii life span

Whaas,
We planted about a dozen Sargent cherries roughly 20 years ago. I haven't noticed any major concerns with pests or diseases, but they don't appear to be very compatible with their rootstock. Most of them have large swellings under the graft union. Not sure if any nurseries are growing them on their own roots, but that would probably help promote longevity.


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RE: Prunus sargentii life span

  • Posted by bboy USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA (My Page) on
    Sun, Feb 2, 14 at 23:17

Liable to be on sweet cherry.


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RE: Prunus sargentii life span

I have a 10-year old Prunus sargentii. It's at least 25 feet tall, healthy and doing well. I live near coastal NJ


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RE: Prunus sargentii life span

  • Posted by whaas 5a SE WI (My Page) on
    Mon, Feb 3, 14 at 11:23

All, thanks for the feedback. I'll give one a shot. Blooms and fall color on one tree make it worthwhile.

I called the source and its budded to Prunus avium, but they called is Mazzard Cherry which is the sample thing I believe.

That fact its grafted to Prunus avium...would that change anyone's opinion as to its lifespan?


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RE: Prunus sargentii life span

  • Posted by bboy USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA (My Page) on
    Mon, Feb 3, 14 at 13:13

Look until you find one raised from seed or even a cutting. In addition to possible delayed graft incompatibility there is the possibility of the aforementioned ugly differential between the diameter of the sweet cherry stem and the stem of the Sargent cherry, as well as likely issues with emergent roots and suckers - here in western USDA 8 sweet cherry root-stocks are often a nightmare in parking strips and other turfed or paved areas.


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RE: Prunus sargentii life span

A visual aid to the potential difference in scion/rootstock sizes - and it can get worse than this! However, I think this amount would warrant removal in your yard.

The tree in the pic is an ash IIRC


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RE: Prunus sargentii life span

  • Posted by bboy USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA (My Page) on
    Tue, Feb 4, 14 at 2:29

Rooting of the scion via slow burial with soil might be possible. In addition to the bulging stock becoming obscured it might have the benefit of getting the scion onto naturally oriented roots - the lopsided appearance of the stock makes it appear it is in the too common deformed condition resulting from overly long confinement to a small container.


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