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Identification Request

Posted by ritmatt GA 7b (My Page) on
Sun, Mar 16, 14 at 16:43

What kind of tree is this?

They are found all over my area near Atlanta. They seem to be understory trees. Most are not more than 10 or 15 feet tall. They tend to hang onto their leaves through winter, when the leaves become light tan in color. They really stand out when nothing else is in bloom.


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Identification Request

Some kind of beech (fagus)

This post was edited by Huggorm on Sun, Mar 16, 14 at 17:04


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RE: Identification Request

beech .... fagus ??? though i admit.. i have no idea if they 'do' atlanta ...

have you seen them in the growing season?? ... if purple leaved .. then copper beech ...

compare at link

ken

Here is a link that might be useful: link


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RE: Identification Request

Thanks, both. Doing a little research on beech trees, I think the American Beech is what I've been seeing. I was thrown off because the books I read said American Beeches get very tall, but all of the trees I've noticed were quite small. Thanks to Ken's link, I found a web page that explained that younger trees are more likely to keep their leaves all winter. So, I'm concluding that there are probably plenty of much taller beeches around, but I haven't recognized them because they have dropped all their leaves. Bottom line is that this is not a good tree to plant under a big maple in my front yard! So, thanks again!


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RE: Identification Request

Yes, definitely American beech, a young one.


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RE: Identification Request

Could be a Musclewood?...


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RE: Identification Request

"I was thrown off because the books I read said American Beeches get very tall, but all of the trees I've noticed were quite small."

American beech is very slow. I've been watching one in the suburbs of Washington, DC, since my teens. It's in the garden of some friends of parents. It was maybe 6' 20 years ago, and is now maybe 25' at most, if not just 20'. No more than 1 ft. per year. Likewise some in the woods near my house seem to have grown only slightly since I bought in the mid 2000s. Though it may depend on the individual clone, the soils, and shade. All of these I mention are shaded; in the case of the local trees they are secondary successional as the maples and cherries die off, and will probably start growing faster soon.


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RE: Identification Request

Some Beach,...some where...

Love that song!


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RE: Identification Request

  • Posted by jqpublic 7b/8a Wake County NC (My Page) on
    Wed, Mar 19, 14 at 1:09

Yup! Definitely, an American Beech. You'll definitely see the young ones as understory trees. The biggest I see are along creeks and in "old growth" forests. The youngsters keep their golden leaves for the majority of the winter.


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