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Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiana

Posted by poaky1 6 Pa (My Page) on
Mon, Mar 4, 13 at 22:29

I have a photo taken in February, about the middle of Feb, of the Live oak that seems to be the closest to Quercus Virginiana. I planted it in spring of 2012, and it has been in ground with no protection other than a wood fence on one side, which is the same as the last 2 I tried in the same general area. Live oak, Q.Fus.X Q. Virg Hybrid Here is another one I was going to take in the basement if it looked like it was dying, but it never looked bad enough to me to take it in, it was right by the house on the South western direction though. Live oak, Q. Virginiana labeled, but showed good hardiness


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RE: Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiana

There are some other live oaks I have planted to see which is the most successful at making it here and growing the best. I may be hard to see the whips. Live oaks, Live oak to porch Live oaks Live oaks pic #2 same tree as above the leaves are tannish red.


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RE: Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiana

They look good Poaky, especially one with leaves.

Here is one of mine from late 2011. Extreme SW Missouri, zone 6b -7a depending on what hardiness zone you refer to.

Photobucket Pictures, Images and Photos

This post was edited by joeinmo on Thu, Apr 11, 13 at 0:37


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RE: Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiana

Sorry here is my image

Photobucket Pictures, Images and Photos


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RE: Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiana

Live oaks in pots are going to have a hard time in zone 6. The entire pot rootball freezes. Not good.

Plant live oaks in the Spring if you can. Plenty of mulch and protection from rabbits, deer, voles, etc.

They will get tougher after they 'dig in' with their roots. Not sure how they will do in zone 6. I would make sure you try to get one from northern provenance. Maybe obtain acorns from native live oaks in Virginia Beach. Or you could try a Q. fusiformis from Oklahoma.


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RE: Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiana

Agreed Dave,

The root ball in a pot is very susceptible to freezing, and killing the plant.


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RE: Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiana

The Live oak in the top pic is showing positive signs, the buds on top are slightly protruding with tiny pink buds. That is the Live oak "late drop" from Mossy oak natives nursery. It was described as a possible cross of another live oak, I suspect the Q. Fusiformis. Those other pics it was hard to see the leaves on those trees but there were some on them. I do have many Q. Fusiformis planted. I have them and the Q. Virginiana crosses, and will see which do the best. I have a Q. Fusiformis in it's 3rd year in my yard. It as my other live oaks has shed it's leaves this spring, but it held them all last season, never loosing them in spring. It is still very small yet though.Joe and Dave, The potted one was going to go indoors, but I wanted to see if it would be okay close to the house, and I left it in the pot anyway.. I will post the results of all the Live oaks when I think that those who are bare still have been given enough time to leaf out. May 12, Mothers day should be long enough. Many of my deciduous oaks are green and pink budded, my Durand oak is nearly totally in leaf, I think unless a bad freeze hits the live oak in pic one, it will be a success for me. It is the most vigorous L.O. in my yard. I will be making a burlap tent or something if we are due for something much lower than 32F. Once it gets settled in a year or 2 I won't worry so much. Joe your Live oak is beautiful. Some of mine had the Holly shaped leaves when they were shipped to me, but most got the smoother edged shape when they leaved out after defoliation the next spring. The weird thing is the trees in the lower elevation of my yard are leafing out sooner than the upper yard. I thought it was colder downhill in a yard. There is a small pond, maybe 30X20 ft in the neighbors yard . It is about 50 to 60 ft from the Durand oak, the Willow oak that is about 30 ft from it is nearly leaved out, the buds are ready to pop. Well, I'll try to show pics when the L.O. leaf out.


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RE: Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiana

Poaky,

Great sign with the new buds, only thing I can think of is down hill trees received more moisture. Looking forward to seeing pics


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RE: Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiana

I am happy to show this Live Live oak photo DSC00226_zpsc016e430.jpgoak has made it. I took pics of the buds breaking, but Why show them when I have leaves coming out in this pic? This is a hybrid, I believe, but has more vigor than my other Quercus Fusiformis X Q. Virginiana, as well as Q. Fusiformis. I have some other live oaks breaking bud in my yard, but this trees has more vigor than the others, unless they surprise me. I have had to make a burlap tent, not touching the leaves on the tree in the pic, we are supposed to go down to 28 or 30 F tonight. The tree may have shrugged it off but it is still a baby @yrs in ground, and I will baby it for a few years. My other trees are leaved out but they always come through okay. Well, I'm really happy with this tree, even if I don't get another like it, I am hoping it keeps it's vigorous habit, it was worth trying and failing with some, and perhaps looking stupid trying over and over til I found this one,I know also, it may die in a year or 2 if we get a horrible winter, although, this past winter was pretty harsh, with sustained teens and low 20's, compared to the winter before. I will be whatching my other Live oaks for growth, too. The tree is the one with a few tan leaves still on it, but has new leaves on top.


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RE: Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiana

I may as wQ. Fus X Virg photo DSC00221_zps93418403.jpgell post this too.


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RE: Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiana

Even that last one may not be dead. A few decades ago, growing a live oak in PA would have been unthinkable. Today, as our winters get warmer and warmer, it might be do-able (in the more southern PA locations).


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RE: Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiana

Tney look great, I do notice that fence with the live oak that has more vigor, almost protected slightly. Are any of your other live oaks protected by the fence?


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RE: Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiana

Sorry, I should have mentioned the 2 pics are the same tree. The 2nd pic is just the budbreak, I had it in the camera so I posted it despite the pic of the leaves already unfurled. There is the fence on one side, and low wall of dry-stacked cement bricks on 2 sides. My other live oaks are not protected in any way. Their fences are open railed metal. The tree in the 2 pics has had frost blacken it's leaves, despite the burlap tent I put around it.This happened the other night. I am hoping that it will put out new leaves. It sucks that frost ruined the new leaves. I may have to take off a few inches to get to good new growth again. I had tried a live oak from Virginia in the same spot as this tree is and it died, despite a warmer winter in 2011-2012, when I tried the Virginia seedling, this species most northern area. So this semi protected area didn't help the Virginia sourced seedling in 2011-2012 winter.


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RE: Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiana

Poaky,

Sorry to hear about the frost, should be okay, I'm sure many buds and leaves still have not popped out on the plant.

Best thing to do is take a water bottle that sprays a good mist and when the temperature gets to 32 or less spray the plant with good coat, do this a couple times and cover the entire plant. It will protect it nicely. Best way is to get the water fairly cold before putting it in the sprayer, that way it freezes on contact.

My Peach tree bloomed on Feb 28 this year after an 80 degree day, a couple days latter we had a cold snap down to 26 degrees. It took me about an hour and a half in the dark with a flashlight, but I coated the entire tree which is about 10ft tall, today I could see baby peaches on it, so it worked. Southwest Missouri is one of the hardest places to grow peaches in the US, because we have early warm spells, and usually a a couple weeks or so afterwards with frost possibilities.


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RE: Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiana

IIRC there used to an article in the Washington Post archive about Lady Bird Johnson wanting a live oak at the White House. (I had free access once) I think they planted Q. myrsinifolia as a subst., even tho it looks rather dissimilar. There are supposedly some trees at St. Elizabeth's, but if there are they won't be there much longer. (site is being redeveloped)
The northernmost authentic articles are the ones in Williamsburg, VA.

You'd be better off finding a Laurel/Darlington oak that has a tendency to stay evergreen and just hoping for a string of mild winters; there used to be a tree like this in Sterling, VA at a shopping center that probably saw temps. close to yours - at least the same order of magnitude of cold - in 1994 and survived them. Even my Q. myrsinifolia was killed to the ground by temps near -10F that wtiner. Funny enough though, that approach might backfire for you. My rare Q. X turneri, as it has gotten older, seems to have "decided" to stop trying to be evergreen. It just drops its leaves now even in a mild winter like the last. When it was young, < 4' tall, it tried to keep them! Remember the plant only has its own survival on the "mind" of its genes, it doesn't care what you want it to do. In all seriousness, it was a seedling and might be a Q. robur backcross; I think the grafted plant at Hill's Nursery in Arlington was usually evergreen. However in 40 years it had only grown to about 20' X 15'! But some kind of epigenetic adaptation to generally colder winters than in Europe is not outside the realm of possibility. My winters are very windy because I'm close to the Chesapeake Bay, even though the seasonal winter lows have averaged to zn 8, plants can dry out quickly.

Surely you know about Oikos Tree Crops? Talk to him on the phone, he may have some advice for you. With all the trees you like to talk about (monkey puzzle, coast redwood, etc.) my advice is to move to California or the PNW! Or at least Norfolk.

EDIT: ooops, it was greenthumbzdude who posted about coast redwood.

This post was edited by davidrt28 on Tue, Apr 23, 13 at 1:20


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RE: Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiana

There is a live oak that is a variation of the Quercus Fusiformis (Texas live oak), it's called a Quartz Mountain live oak, and is naturally occurring in far western Okahoma, which is an area that regularly see low temps near zero or even below. It's suppose to be zone 4 tolerant when it comes to roots and will do well in zone 6b with leaves remaining all year. I would try this in Pennsylvannia. The one big difference between the two locations is while western Oklahoma might hit zero or less, the very next day it might be 60, on the other hand while you might not see very many zero days in the Pennsylvania zone 6 area, you might see a week of 5-10 degree lows every 10 years and this could cause problems on young trees.

Here is a link that might be useful: Quartz Mountain Live Oak

This post was edited by joeinmo on Tue, Apr 23, 13 at 18:26


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RE: Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiana

I have a quercus Fusiformis that is very hardy, I've had it unprotected for 3 years here in Pa, it held it's leaves for 2 years straight but has shed them this spring. It was my first attempt to grow the smaller Q. Fusiformis. There is a Q. Virginiana in Wash. D.C. by one of the marine museums. I can't remember 100% if it was the marine museum, but I definitely read and saw a pic of the Live oak. I have seen the quartz mountain live oak recommended to me more than once. I have a seed grown Oklahoma or north Texas Live oak in my yard with perfect green leaves that it kept from last year. I am not mentioning it til now because it is about 2 inches tall, and looks like it is going to grow very slowly. I have another in the front yard ready to put out leaves, it is one in the top pictures with the black rail fence around it. I have them planted in many places. They were planted in fall of last year. Many have been beheaded by bunnies etc. I'll post an update once some growth has taken place. My Live oak Overcup oak hybrids are raring to go, one had 6 inches get frost burned from it's top already. My Durand oak has kept it's leaves from last year, has grown some and has no frost damage although it is about 30 ft away from the frost damaged hybrid Live and Overcup oak. Strange. I have seen it mentioned that Q. Fusiformis is the most cold tolerant Live oak and the quartz mountain q. F. even hardier. When I tried to get a Quartz mountain L.O. at first it was sold out. I think one of mine may be one anyway, probably the 2 inch tall one. The Darlington oak dies young I've heard, so I avoid it.


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RE: Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiana

Good to hear your Fusiformis are growing great, they are hardy and once they hit the 3ft mark they should grow much faster. I also have been wanting a Quartz Mountain, they are hard to get.

I also have some Giant Seqouias, thats another story :)


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RE: Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiana

I had a Giant Sequoia for a couple years, I think I got too close with the round-up. I got my Q. Fusiformis from Oaks of the wild west, and some from seed offered on gardenweb Texas or Oklahoma site. Maybe one from Ebay. I just found Holm oak seed on ebay about 2 hours ago. It was approx. $10.00 for 5 seeds. Maybe less, I can't remember for sure. The source is Mediteranean, it's Malta, I think any zone 7-8 people may be successful, my effort is kinda like a lottery ticket, I guess. I have tried OIKOS, but they are in zone 5 and their live oak is a DWARF, and not ever going to get large, whereas Q. Fusiformis may get to be 15 ft tall or more before I croak, hopefully anyway.I'm 42 so I'll see some size, barring an early end for me, sorry for being morbid, but you get my drift?


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RE: Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiana

I researched that Holm Oak, nice looking, it's seems to be very cold hardy,I think no problem with zone 6

Yep roundup not good for trees, my Sequoia are doing great.

I'm a year older than you, so right with ya :)


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RE: Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiana

Just transplanted some of my seedlings to bigger pots, I have about 40 more to go ugh!


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RE: Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiana

My Live oak is putting out more leaves again, so I'm happy. I will be happy if it stays above freezing for the next 15 days. My other 2 Live oak "late drop" are starting to push out leaves also, they've been showing signs of doing so for more than a week, but held back by some chilly evenings.


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RE: Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiana

Poaky,

That's great news, I figured they would push out new leaves, should be just a matter of time with some warm temps and spring storms to really make them grow, show some photos in a couple weeks.


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RE: Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiana

"I researched that Holm Oak, nice looking, it's seems to be very cold hardy,I think no problem with zone 6 "

Not at all unless you are taking about the fairly ubiquitous (in Europe!) hybrids between it and Q. robur. (one of which is curiously called "Quercus x turneri 'Pseudoturneri'" - the False Turner's Turner Oak!) A seed strain of Q. ilex Oikos had in the 1990s that was supposedly collected in some cold part of interior southern France completely croaked around 0F for me, two plants in different locations. Completely. Not even able to sprout from the base. (this was after 1994, when zn 6 temps severe damaged my 8' Q. myrsinifolia) It's native range in Europe is all zn 8 - zn 10. A similar sized Quercus suber was hardier and managed to re-sprout from the top, but probably couldn't have done that every year. It might get a little hardier with age, though. The ones in St. Andrews Scotland seemed undamaged after 1996, when the temp was 7-10F ish, cold enough to kill all the tree sized Cordylines down back to the lower meter or so of trunk. (in other words, that is area is normally on the zn 9/8 border) But there is no way they are zn 6 hardy.

This post was edited by davidrt28 on Sun, Apr 28, 13 at 16:21


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RE: Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiian

Yep, correct I was thinking more of the inland version. sub speciies Balotta


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RE: Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiana

Now that I think about it I think the seedling I tried and failed at was a Turners oak, not Holm oak. I was supposed to be a seedling, not grafted. I am still waiting for my Holm oak acorns from ebay.


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RE: Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiana

Quercus ilex ssp. ballota?

Hhhmmmm. I haven't heard of this subspecies, but "central and southern Iberia" doesn't sound much milder to me than the interior parts of the central Med. coast of France, which have been down around 0F in the very coldest winters in recorded history. Record low for Madrid is 5F. Maybe some of them in the Atlas mountains would be hardy, if they could ever be collected. However, the number of plants from that region that have actually proven to be long term plants in zn 7 east coast conditions is rather slim.

As I said, they might get a little hardier with age, and I was an inexperienced gardener back then. It's possible they weren't fully hardened off. They were in the 2-3' range and had maybe come through one or two previous winters. Still I'd be hesitant to trust something that dies that easily to a permanent position in the garden. The Quercus suber is definitely hardier and lasted a few more years. The people who bought my parent's house finally cut it down after one of the sorta cold winters of the early 2000s, it was maybe 9' tall. It probably would have come back, but I can see why they wanted something that looked like cr-p out of their garden. It wasn't very pretty under the best of circumstances: all of these Mediterranean evergreen/sclerophyllous oaks are rather ugly until they become full sized trees. If I had to have one evergreen oak to try I'd much rather it be one of the American or Asian ones.

It's a darn shame someone hasn't imported scions of the Lucombe oak, which would probably be more likely to stay evergreen than the Q.X turneri, and is absolutely one of the most magnificent oaks of them all. I still remember seeing the tree at Kew for the first time in 1993. It has big, bold glossy leaves. Really striking. Sadly one of the many great European garden plants that has never been imported to the US.

Here is a link that might be useful: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quercus_ilex


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RE: Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiana

I am sorry, but the tree that I have tried and failed to grow was the Q. Robur X quercus Ilex, AKA Turners oak. will be receiving the Holm oak acorns (hopefully) any day now from Malta.


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RE: Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiana

My Live oak "late drop" trees are taking their time leafing out and the one "releafing" out. I may have to wait a week and a half for pics of leaf-out for them. I have gotten Beadles oak and OvercupX White oak from Mossy oak natives. Also a Bald Cypress for an area that has a good bit of water about 2 ft down under the top "shelf" of soil.


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RE: Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiana

  • Posted by beng z6 western MD (My Page) on
    Thu, May 2, 13 at 11:05

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Posted by davidrt28 7 (My Page) on
Wed, May 1, 13 at 5:52

It wasn't very pretty under the best of circumstances: all of these Mediterranean evergreen/sclerophyllous oaks are rather ugly until they become full sized trees.
***

Funny, I have to agree. As much as I was impressed by the the huge, old Live oaks near/in New Orleans, the younger ones were just non-descript. Most any other oak looks better while young.


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RE: Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiana

Beng,

I think David was talking about variations of the Southern Europe Holm Oaks, not American Live Oaks. I think young live oaks are great looking and they are still nice and green in the winter, instead of some ugly leafless trees that look dead.


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RE: Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiana

Poaky,

Yes in general these live oaks leaf out slowly, but good to know your one live oak is releafing at the freeze you had.


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RE: Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiana

Poaky,

This stuff is supposed to be great for live oak, it's called ectomycorrhizae fungi, and it forms a symbiotic relationship with the roots. I am going to get some, dissolve in rain water (tap has chlorine will kill fungi) and pour into soil around the trees.

You can get it at link I provided.

Here is a link that might be useful: Fungi for healthy plants and trees


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RE: Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiana

There is a organic fert that includes soil goodies but I have public water and wonder if it kills anything good present in the soil or any compost I might add. We used to have well water but the neighbors septic was contaminating our well. Pretty gross and the prick was a home builder for years, he purposely moved his septic. When my family didn't want to kick in for public water years ago, he moved his septic close to our well. I was a kid when this happened, though.When we could use our well, it was high in calcium and we had to use water softener. I wonder if my public water would do in any miccorhizae fungi. I could get the Mycorrhizae fungi from local woods, there is a colony of oak Beech woods very close to me. There are wild woodland Mayapple, Trillium, Virginia bluebells and bears breeches in the Understory. This is a beautiful untouched TINY slice of heaven. There are a couple of areas like this near me. One area is small and may be too small for much change to happen there. The other could eventually be sold as wooded plots. The owner has made a road through the woods. I hope if he sells off plots that the homebuilders will put their homes among the native trees and foliage present there vs clearing out the native trees that have likely been there for many years. I know they've been there for all of my 42 years, and were mature forest when I was 6 years old and my parents bought my present homesite. I;m sorry this has gone off topic, but, I will take a few soil shovels in these oak beech plots to obtain Mycorrhizae in case it isn't there already. The only trees I have any trouble growing are Hemlocks. Both Eastern and the Western variety. My soil tests show that all I'm lacking is calcium when testing against a site with nice green hemlock trees. I added gypsum with no improvement. All other soil elements are better than the site where the nice green Hemlocks are in the wild.I used gypsum because my soil PH is about 6. My dad used to lime every spring years ago. Also there is a row of nicely green Hemlocks about 2 miles from me, so the Whooly Adegid is seemingly uinlikely.


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RE: Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiana

Within a week or 2 I can take new pics of my Live oak "late drop". The leaves are coming out but will look better after a week or 2. I have 2 other Live oak "late drop' Trees that are waking up also. I will take pics of all 3.


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RE: Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiana

Poaky,

Looking forward to photos

I read somewhere that once the fungi is in the soil, the chlorine is neutralized.

I was wondering how the live oak that was frost bitten is looking, is it pushing out new leaves where the dead black ones were?

This post was edited by joeinmo on Wed, May 8, 13 at 8:49


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RE: Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiana

"Beng,

I think David was talking about variations of the Southern Europe Holm Oaks, not American Live Oaks. I think young live oaks are great looking and they are still nice and green in the winter, instead of some ugly leafless trees that look dead."

Yep. Young live oaks look like any other young oak. Maybe a little more branch-y. For some reason, any immature evergreen European oak I've seen...and that includes a few in Europe...is weirdly gawky and awkward looking. At some arboretum on the East coast...could be the VA State one, I was surprised to find one of the semi-evergreen SW European species besides Q. suber and Q. ilex. Might have been .Q faginea. It too, was very ugly.
Maybe it's all the better for hiding oneself in the garigue or something.

Here is a link that might be useful: http://www.barcham.co.uk/sites/default/files/imagecache/page_slideshow/F1_-_Quercus_suber_row.JPG

This post was edited by davidrt28 on Wed, May 8, 13 at 23:53


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even this nursery acknowledges the problem

"Until it gets beyond semi-mature it is often buoyed up by a thick bamboo cane by nurseries to support the weak stem.

Our advice is never accept one unless it is strong enough to support itself."

Here is a link that might be useful: http://www.barcham.co.uk/trees/quercus-suber-cork-oak


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RE: Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiana

My Live oak "Late drop" seedlings are getting leaves. I took pics today. My brother will help me post them tomorrow evening. We have a possible 31F evening coming up in a few days. I will not be covering the trees though. The last protection effort made no difference, or did more harm than good. I am hoping that the rain that is forecasted saves the new bud-break foliage from harm.


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RE: Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiana

Poaky,

Looking forward to the pics, as for the 31 degree temperature, water the soil below your live oak trees right at about 32 degrees, this will increase the temperature around the trees by a couple degrees for about an hour or two.

More than likely that 31 degree temp will happen around 5:30 am - 6 am, so get up a little earlier and water.

The water releases thermal units as the water evaporates, this then heats up the surrounding area around the tree.


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RE: Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiana

 photo DSC00227_zpsfcb0a429.jpg


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RE: Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiana

 photo DSC00229_zps71f8e45e.jpg These 2 photos are of the more protected Live oak.


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RE: Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiana

Poaky,

Looks great, nice bounce back from that frost.


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RE: Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiana

The Live oak may take a minute to find in the 2nd pic. I took these pics before last nights frost, but the tree wasn't harmed, but the foliage turned a burgundy shade. The very top leaves weren't out completely. I will post my other 2 Live oak " Late drop" taken on Fri 10th of May.  photo DSC00236_zps8b13fa1b.jpg  photo DSC00237_zps25b698c2.jpg


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RE: Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiana

The last 2 pics above are 2 different trees, separate from the top 2 pics . The top 2 pics are the same tree, followed by tree 2 and 3 at the bottom. So far so good.


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RE: Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiana

Joe in MO, I have purchased a organic food with ecto and endo fungis. My soil is probably already full of them, but if nothing else it's an organic fert.


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RE: Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiana

Here is another live oak I have. It's Interesting how the same variety Quercus Fusiformis can look different from one tree to the next when young.

Photobucket Pictures, Images and Photos


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RE: Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiana

Poaky,

Ok I see the difference in your trees. Some Live Oak have red or burgundy when the leaves first leaf out, then they turn bright green. In the pic I added above, the leaves were reddish burgundy and as you can see are now bright green.

PS - It was 88 degrees here in SW Missouri today. Live Oaks love the heat

This post was edited by joeinmo on Tue, May 14, 13 at 23:13


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RE: Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiana

Poaky,

Looking Forward to see how the fungis works for you in your area. Will keep you informed about my experiment with it as well.


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RE: Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiana

Poaky,

How did your live oaks do during that late May frost?


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RE: Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiana

All 3 of the Live oak "late drop" are doing great. I stayed up all night and sprayed them with a hose before the sun hit the leaves. It worked, they didn't get damaged the last frost day. The top inch of one had 2 leaves brown, no big deal. I moved one of them where my Quercus Fusiformis was, because the top never releafed out on the Q. Fusiformis, but it put out 2 suckers. I will let both grow and see which grows more vigorously for the season. I have since bought a couple more Live oak "late drop" because they came out great this past winter. Something that no regular Quercus Virginiana has done, and I've tried a few before. This past winter was pretty harsh, with days of sustained 20's and some teens and single digits. I have one that is in a downslope area, which may be colder than where the others are. Joeinmo, your tree is more developed than mine. Mine should start to branch out this year or next. I will post more pics after the trees put out a growth spurt or 2. Are your Live oaks regular Q. Virginiana? In the past I tried a Q. V. from Virginia, and it croaked.


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RE: Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiana

Poaky,

Mine are Quercus Fusiformis and I have one that is hybrid Fusiformis/Virginiana.

Glad to hear the watering down worked.

Looking forward to some pics of some good leaf out soon.


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RE: Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiana

good job poaky and joeinmo guess what? Cistus nursery has a zone 5 Quercus Chrysolepis you may want to try. A few other good EG oaks to try too. Don't buy them all tho- I want to try some too!! :)

Here is a link that might be useful: Cistus nursery EG oaks


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RE: Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiana

HardyTropical,

Thanks for the info, there are a few I'm going try from that website.


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RE: Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiana

I have about 7 Live oaks in my yard now 4 lived and are doing good after last winter, I added 3 more from Mossy oak natives, and the Q. Fusiformis is in it's 4th year in my yard. The Q. Fusiformis looks great but has not put on any verticle growth. It came up from the roots and has 2 leaders that are not more than 2 inches in height above last years height, making it about 14 inches tall.. I added another Live oak late drop 2 feet from this Q. Fusiformis to see which one does best in a several year time period. If the Mossy oak Late drop don't make it for 3 or 4 years in a row, I'll have my Q. Fusiformis that grow S_L_O_W_L_Y, but still stay alive. I haven't gotten any noticeable growth from the other Live oaks yet, but will post if I do.


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RE: Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiana

I have read the info on the Quercus Chysolepis and the hardiness is great, but I am worried about the rainfall here being more than the tree is adapted for. I guess my Quercus Fusiformis is happy with less rain than it gets here. I am tempted to order a Q. Chysolpepis anyway. I am very hopeful for the Late drop Live oaks I have though. I have a Burr oak from Dax's acorns he sent last fall. I chose the most vigorous sprout out of 4 or 5 . Oh, you know I am going to squeeze more in somewhere.


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RE: Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiana

It's me AGAIN. From the description, the Q. Chrylosepis is as slow as Q. Fusiformis. If anyone has planted or WILL plant one give updates. My Durand oak has been evergreen from last spring (when I first planted it) until the present. The leaves are narrow and close to Live oak leaves when they have the holly-like shape. That may change eventually, but is persistent now.


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RE: Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiana

Poaky,

Not sure how hot it is in PA, but heat is what live oaks love.

Mine grow like weeds with heat and water.

99 to 96 degrees here today


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RE: Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiana

I agree with Joe. The heat really makes em push the new growth out. Although they break bud in April, mine don't really start pushing hard until the middle of June. The tree in my yard put on a foot in the last 1-1.5 weeks while only pushing ~4-6" the two months previous to that.

John


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RE: Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiana

John,

Same here,put on a foot of growth on last week or 2.

Last year all that 100 degree heat only cause them to grow.


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RE: Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiana

My LO from last year are putting out new growth. We have had high 80's for about a week and then 3-4 days of heavy rain. The new ones are starting to put out some new growth also. They would probably be taller if the spring growth that frost damaged would have not been killed back. The new growth is just starting to get going and is only about 3 inches tall on most of these L.O. The Q. Fusiformis in it's 4th year or 3rd, sorry not sure, has sprouted from the roots. I am hoping the more vigorous Live oak "Late drop" make it through winter 2013-2014, and I think they will, but the Q. Fusiformis Pretty surely will. When the new growth gets beyond 3 inches, I will take more pics of the "Late drop" live oak that I planted Spring 2012. I hope there is lots of new growth to show. Wish me luck.


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RE: Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiana

I don't have anything great to add yet, but the Live oak "Late drop" in the first picture of this thread has put out 7 inches approx. this season. My Q. Fusiformis is looking nice at about 14 inches tall. The other 2 late drop Live oak only pushed out a few inches so far, but look ok anyway. My Durand oak may be a hybrid, or not. It has kept it's foliage from last growing season and over the past winter and is still holding the same leaves. The leaves are shaped like the thin holly-like leaves of some live oaks.


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RE: Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiana

My Q. virginianas are loving this wetter summer. Some summers the newer later growth tips will wilt and dry up in mid-July and August. This season they've never looked better. Tallest one is about 15 feet now.

Also, the Ubame oak is really looking good too. I think this might be a tad hardier than virginiana and I think it's a more handsome tree -- at least the leaves are nicer. I've never seen a really mature Ubame, so can't comment on the mature tree form compared to Southern live oak.

My Chinese evergreen oak is putting out a huge new flush of burgundy leaves from the steady rains. Love to see this! New growth seems to be larger in leaf size than the Spring flush.


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RE: Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiana

My Q. Virginiana "late drop' is about 8-9" new growth . Not much more than my last post in other words. Joe in Moe that is great that yours is doing good. I just hope that I can get close to 2 feet on my Live oak late drop by the end of the season. I am happy about my Durand oak being evergreen for almost a full year also. I am also glad my oaks have stayed free of oak wilt, with me adding oaks from Arizona and Louisiana also Florida, and having no problems. My other Late drop, Live oaks are looking good but aren't as impressive as the one in the first pic on this thread. There is another that is putting on a little more growth. I will post updates in the early fall after they all have put out all the growth they will for the growing season. Joe in Moe let me see in pics, how your Live oak has done also. Just to clarify, your above pictured Live oakj is growing in Missouri?


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RE: Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiana

Poaky, I live in extreme SW Missouri, about 30 min from Arkansas border, 45 min to Oklahoma border, 5 hours to the Texas Border. Missouri can range from zone 5 to zone 7a depending if you live in the northern part to the southern part, generally most anything south of I-44 is considered the southern portion. We are considered mid-south or southern plains, although we live in the Ozark Mountains. Missouri Borders Iowa, Illinois, Nebraska and
Kansas on the north side of the state and borders, Kentucky Tennessee, Arkansas and Oklahoma on the Southern side, there is a huge range of plants, trees and temperatures and climate from one end to the next. Northern part of the state is prairie and flat, gets significant snow cold winters and mild summers and looks like Iowa. Southern part has hills and Mountains and has little snow if any, has oaks, maples, cypress, magnolia etc., has mild dry winters and hot humid summers. So think southern or Tennessee-like. Yes the Live Oaks I have are here in Southern Missouri.

I sent you a photo of a new spurt of 8" growth on my tree from the past week.
Overall, depending on which one of my 3 live oaks you look at, I have had between 12" to "18 inches of new growth, with at least 4 more months of good growth opportunity.

Photobucket Pictures, Images and Photos


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RE: Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiana

Looks good Joe, My Q. Fusiformis has gotten wider, but not much taller than 8-10 inches. It has put out 2 side branches.There is no doubt that Q. Fusiformis is zone 6 hardy, but grows slowly. My "late drop" Live oak are still the same as my post 1 -4 days ago. I caught another "late drop" Live oak that had gotten pinned to the ground accidentally. It was still securely rooted in the ground and I was able to right it up and it looks salvageable still. You said you have another 4 months of growth. I have about another 2 1/2 to 3 depending on weather patterns. Sometimes October can be mostly mild, and November being when things get seriously cold. I guess it will be a wait and see thing. I'll try to get a couple pics of those that have been in the ground since last season.


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RE: Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiana

I have a pic of the Live oak late drop in the 1st pic on the thread. Yr 2 for Live oak It is the tallest plant against the wood fence backdrop. My Durand oak that kept it's leaves is here Durand oak yr 2 in my yard photo DSC00315_zpsebcb0f4f.jpg


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RE: Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiana

The Live oak against the wood fence has put out 8-10 inches so far this season. There are lots of plants in the photo, but it is the tallest. There is a Rhody and Sweet woodruff behind it. The last pic is my 2 year old Durand oak. It kept it's leaves last year until present. Last winter was persistent cold but no horrible extreme cold. I have yet to purchase a weather station though.


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RE: Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiana

They look good, the late drop looks much bigger.

I'm going to look up the Durand Oak


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RE: Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiana

The "Late drop" is probably a Q. Fusiformis X Q. Virginiana hybrid. My Durand oak is a white family oak, zone 6 +. Possibly related to Live oak. I got it from Mossy oak native nursery.


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RE: Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiana

I was thinking your late drop was Fusiformis and Virginiana too, fast grower.

Here is a photo of my baby acorns on my Fusiformis, approximately a 4 year tree or so.

Photobucket Pictures, Images and Photos


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RE: Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiana

Joe, your live oak is ahead of all of mine. My L.O. in the fenced/protected zone is due for another vertical growth sprout, but yours is more developed certainly to be making acorns. I will take more pics in late Aug or Sept. Maybe Oct. Whenever the last spurt gets unfurled.


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RE: Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiana

Poaky,

Not sure how old your live oaks are, but mine are 4 years now, so look for yours to start producing acorns at about that age.


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RE: Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiana

Joe, My Q. Fusiformis is about 4, well, 3 1/2 years in my yard. My Q. V. X Q. F (or) AKA Live oak Late drop, were planted Spring 2012. I also added 3 or 4 more this spring. I put them in my lower yard, which may be colder than the 3 in my upper yard. Sorry to repeat myself, but the late drop are already taller in one year than my Q. Fusiformis. I will take a better pic of the plain Q. Fusiformis when the growing season is nearly done.


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RE: Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiana

Looking forward to the pics, I guess these Fusiformis love the heat and grow faster out here


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RE: Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiana

My Q. Fusiformis that was only 2 inches tall is about 14 inches tall or more, and getting side branches. It's a big deal to me, so humor me. Other Live oaks are still growing. I will try to take better pics of end of season growth, it's hard to see the trees in some of my pics. Maybe my brother can hold some paper again st the back of the trees, so you can see them good.


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RE: Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiana

looking forward to it


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RE: Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiana

I finally got up-to-date Live oak pictures for Sept 2013. The first one is the one in the protected area that I planted in Spring 2012. late drop L.O. back yard summer 2013 photo <a href=back yard late dr. live oak fall 2013 photo DSC00335_zps0a2a8f41.jpgDSC00336_zpsbde8063b.jpg"/>


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RE: Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiana

The next 2 are 2 separate L.O Late drop from my dog yard dog yard late drop L.O fall 2013 1 yr photo DSC00337_zps6ae8911d.jpg The next one Front yard middle Late dr. L.O. fall 2013 photo DSC00338_zpsa54c0e82.jpg This last one is a new spring 2013 transplant, but there are 2 from spring 2012 that I thought died, and they are the 2 small green things about 3 inches tall in front of this tree pic. And then my Q. Fusiformis from winter 2010 is in the last picture here, it had died back to the ground twice and is now about 2 ft as the last picture shows. Q. Fusiformis at3 yrs in-ground fall 2013 photo DSC00329_zps678beaf9.jpg I have 3 more of these( the Late drop L.O) in my yard but they are spring 2013 transplants. I shouldn't have shown the one yr transplant, I may have to move it and let one of the babies in front grow up, I am giving a friend one of them in fall, though. I hope I haven't jumbled the descriptions together, and it is understandable.


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RE: Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiana

Basically I have 2 late drop live oak that are approaching winter #2, besides the tiny 2 in front of the spring 2013 transplant with the black fence around them. I think I will move the babies instead of the taller whip that has some height to it. If my other Late drop L.O make it through this coming winter I will update in spring. Joe (or anyone in zone 6 ) How is your L.O doing after this growing season?


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RE: Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiana

Poaky,

They Look great, I will update with pics of mine soon.


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RE: Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiana

Poaky,

Another winter coming on, I will get some pictures posted when all the other trees lose their leaves but my live oaks still are nice and green.

Probably late Nov or Dec.


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RE: Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiana

I know Joe, I am worried a little about the live oaks not surviving this winter. They did great last winter, but it was a rainy winter last winter, what if this winter isn't? Well, I guess that's what watering cans are for. While they are small it's easy. My "late drop" live oaks did better than my Fusiformis. The 3 I have of Fusiformis died back to 3 inches this past winter. Well, anyway, I am looking forward to your update photos, if you have time to post, no hurry, whenever you can get to it. I will add one thing, all of my Late drop L.O. have more spikey leaves than when they were planted spring 2012. They arrived with no leaf sinuses, and releafed in spring 2013 with the holly looking shape, I guess that is what they call "site plastic".


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RE: Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiana

Poaky,

I think might have a slightly colder winter without any sunspot activity.

Yes mine have gotten spiked too, but as the tree gets taller, the lower leaves stay smooth.


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RE: Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiana

I just found this after posting about Compton's Oak and whether or not it ends up evergreen.

I'm a zone warmer, so it might be worth it for me to try Fusiformis as well as the "late drop" which must be the one that Nativ Nurseries sells??

However, you NEVER see a true Q. virginiana around here. In DC proper, yes (there are some at the National Arboretum) but not here.

The closest thing to an evergreen oak I've seen here is a Q. hemisphaerica (not sure I'm spelling that right and too lazy to google) and it does end up bare by February usually.


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RE: Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiana

Hairmetal,

Try the Fusiformis and even though you live in USDa z7, thats an average, these trees love heat.

Check out your heat zone below

Here is a link that might be useful: Heat Zones


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RE: Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiana

My heat zone is either 6 or 7, but I can't zoom in close enough to be sure.


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RE: Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiana

Cold isn't the only thing trees have to endure. My virginiana was growing just fine, passed though a few winters and getting size. Then, it got crushed by Fallen trees thanks to Sandy. Have another containerized one for the Spring.


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RE: Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiana

Hairmetal, my Compton's oak about 40 ft from the house remained evergreen until the next spring. I have 2 more that lost their leaves by December. If you decide to buy from Mossy oak natives Nursery, you will need to spend about $20.00 approx., as a minimum, so you can always try the "late drop" Live oak, they are cheap enough that if you lost out I think they are $5-$6 a tree, so no big loss. I only know of one source of Q. Fusiformis, Oaks of the wild west in Arizona. My Q. Fusiformis have all lost their top growth over the first winter down to 2-3 ". One has done this twice, and in it's 3rd year it is shorter than a first year seedling of the Late drop L.O. It's your choice, the Compton's are nice so far, but if you have room to try the late drop, if mine did ok this past winter in zone 6 you should be fine. The Compton's oak champion in Virginia is as big as most Southern live oaks, but the branching pattern and texture are not the same as the Live oak, I can only guess the Late drop will have the structure of the true Southern L.O.


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RE: Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiana

I forgot to add shipping turned the $20.00 price on the 4 Late drop live.o I ordered to $30.00 for the 4 trees


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RE: Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiana

Njoasis, I know it's possible that snow can cause a lot of damage to live oaks, but the much weaker white pines we have have been damaged, but not torn down by some really wet heavy snow over the 40 years in our yard. It is good that you have shared your experience so people can judge if they want to risk it. But it was the OTHER trees that fell down on the live oak. I am worried about my Magnolia grandifolia when it gets larger, having enough wet snow to make it loose limbs, but the L.O. has fine leaves and I don't think will have as bad of a time with snow load until kit gets thickly foliated.


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RE: Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiana

If you are in zone 7 or higher, the live oak tree should survive regardless of snow load. I would agree, grandifloras may be more sensitive to snow loads but this depends on the variety of grandiflora--some are very vulnerable, others are just not damaged (in my experience).
Growing a Live Oak in zone 6 is really pushing it. Good luck with that. I have usually seen them listed as good to 7, but even so, I don't see any around me. But, this is sometimes due to lack of availability and gardening traditions. There is a beautiful, big, long leaf pine on my block which is also listed as good to Zone 7, but I never see them either!


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RE: Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiana

"If you are in zone 7 or higher, the live oak tree should survive regardless of snow load. "

I don't know about this blanket statement. Zone 7 would mean Martha's Vineyard. It is solidly zn 7 but I would doubt there's one at Polly HIll. It's just that the summers aren't very warm, probably not warm enough to harden the wood of a live oak. Even in the zn 7 suburbs of DC, Balto., northern Delaware, etc. Magnolia grandifora is clearly orders of magnitude more prevalent than live oak. Yes it's a more marketable tree perhaps (the magnolia I mean) but if live oaks were plenty hardy, we'd expect to see more of them. I really think they are only 7b hardy in their normal form...and with respect to "big tree hardiness" when you really don't want to have a massive die off of the top. (clearly for a shrub, or even something like a fig or pomegranate, you care less if it dies back to the ground) The last place in Virginia they are common is Williamsburg. Of course some forms could be hardier. Some of the ones in Williamsburg were singed by 0F in 1994. (and the less hardy Asian oaks like Q. acuta looked really bad)

There used to be a live oak at Hill's Nursery in Arlington, VA. Looked OK but when Mr. Hill was consulted by Lady Bird Johnson for planting a live oak at the White House, he planted a Quercus myrsinifolia! If you have access to the Washington Post archives search "Hill's Nursery live oak" and you should find the article from the 1990s about their history in DC. The "City of Trees" book also has something to say about the subject.

Here is a link that might be useful: http://arnoldia.arboretum.harvard.edu/pdf/articles/2013-70-3-the-quest-for-the-hardy-southern-live-oak.pdf


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RE: Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiana

BTW, with this thread becoming unwieldy, I recommend we start a "PART 2" version of it.


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RE: Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiana

Honestly zones are just a guess. You have USDA which is mainly gardenening, you have Arborday which is mainly trees, you have heat zones, sunset zones etc.

I am in 6b USDA, but 7 Arborday and my heat zone is 7 southern here in SW Missouri. In addition, there are a few varieties of Live Oak. Late Drop, Fusiformis etc. - If you have a Fusiformis it will be ok in 6b, it might grow slowly in a low heat zone, it needs heat.

Live oaks are among the strongest oaks in the United States, they can survive snow cover, in addition their leaves are small and won't carry much load.


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RE: Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiana

I am only heat zone 6 and Hardiness 6. I am happy with my spring 2012 planted live oaks. Hybrids of Q. FusiformisX Q. Virginiana. They are showing great growth from 2013 spring growth all the way too the current fall season. I think that my Live oaks will do great in zone 6, in full sun zone 6, compared to partial sun zone 7.


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RE: Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiana

Ok, All I can say 100% is that my Live oak-Late drop _ Quercus Virginiana, has done great in zone 6 Pa in winter 2012-2013. It held on to it's leaves until May 2013. It started to bud out in May 2013, but the weather wasn't ready to be steady enough to not destroy the new buds until some weeks later.


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RE: Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiana

I can't say all tender growth trees have adjusted to some colder areas, but some have, so why not try some if you want to try?


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RE: Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiana

Poaky,

How are Fusiformis and Late Drop doing this fall?

I'll probably get some pics out when all other trees have lost their leaves :)


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RE: Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiana

Good to hear from you Joe in Mo. So far my Live oak "late drop" trees, 3 of them on year 2 in-ground, look nice and green yet, as of November 1, 2013. My other 4 planted this past summer are okay.. Anyhoo, I hope my potential hybrid live oak "late drops" are okay in a colder zone, being "zone 6". I hope I didn't make a mistake in listing how many trees were successful, so far. I will just say all is fine so far. I am confident that the newbie Live oak "late drop" will be hardy, just like my original 3 Live oak "late drop"


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RE: Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiana

I forgot to add that the plain Q. Fusiformis is still green. It will not be stressed (and the "late drop" live oak also) won't be stressed until late December and January, also February, March. Once April comes around, the Live oaks may put out some growth that will be ruined by spring frosts. May, likely middle to late May it will be safe for new growth, to not be ruined by late frosts.


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RE: Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiana

Hi Poaky,

Glad to hear all well, mine are all still green, except one that might have gotten too much water has a couple yellow leaves here and there.


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RE: Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiana

The 4 new Live oak "late drop" I ordered in October were yellow leaved on arrival. I think they will look fine after next spring leaf-out. When I tried regular Live oak a few years ago ( from Virginia ) it looked fine until about December, approximately.That is why I mentioned me not counting some cold until about December and forward, to get too happy that the trees may be fine until spring. I will be happy if they're green in January, of course, but there's always a chance for unexpected lows. I just looked over this whole thread and I haven't posted any pics of the Q. Fusiformis you asked about. I will post it, this was an end of summer 2013 pic of the Fusiformis. Q. Fusiformis at3 yrs in-ground fall 2013 photo DSC00329_zps678beaf9.jpg The tree died to the ground after the first winter, came back and did great in winter #2. Then died back over winter 2012-2013, and over the 2013 growing season it grew up about 18 " more than it's 3" at the start of spring 2013. So it looks okay, but if it dies back again, I already have a "late drop" planted near it, just incase.


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RE: Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiana

I have 2 other Q. Fusiformis I forgot to mention because they died back the first winter and are now about 3" tall, really disappointing compared to the "late drop" LO. I found an old post I made that I had mentioned some teens in Jan and Feb, so I guess if they're still green in late Feb, I can get happy.


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RE: Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiana

Poaky,

Very interesting about the die off and grow back of the Fusiformis. So the late drop LO are what combo of hybrid?


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RE: Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiana

Poaky,

Was thinking about Fusiformis die off during winter, I think the stem stays tender longer, while your latedrop probably turns a bit more woody. I think if you cover the Fusiformis this year with a large pot when you temps get below 15 degrees, next year they will be "woody" enough to survive next winter.


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RE: Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiana

JoeIn Mo, I had thought that the Q. Fusiformis would be the tough one. You know that the tree with that name would survive in tact compared to the "late drop" Q. Virginiana, It seems as though the Quercus Virginiana "late drop" is really the better tree to try in my zone 6 yard, where it has dropped to -8 F for one night. I can only guess what the Live oak "late drop" are genetically. I had guessed Q. VirginianaX Q. Fusiformis. It is not mentioned on the Mossy oak natives web site what it is, but is mentioned that it is a possible cross breed or back-cross of other live oaks. I just assumed it was Q. V X Q. F, because of the leaf form being really close to the 2 live oak I mentioned being a possible cross. I am sorry if I guessed wronge.


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RE: Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiana

Nothing big to add yet, but I will just add that on the Mossy oak natives website, there is a brief video of the "late drop" live oak MOMMA tree in the background, but unfortunately it's in a wooded area and just a tall evergreen oak in a wooded lot, so I know it isn't a scrub live oak, but you can just ASSUME that in full sun it will look like what you imagine a live oak to look like, of course, meaning wide spreading shade tree. I want to add that I gave my best friend 2 of these "late drop" live oaks in Sept 2013, planted them for her, because she is a possible zone 5b. She is at the foot of the Appalacian Mtns. I misspelled that probably. Her yard is brutal as far as wind goes. Her yard gets wind-blasted in winter. Much more than mine. I just need to get some critter detterent fences up for her. She gets lots of deer and rabbits, she is surrounded by woods. I hope the critters don't interfere with these live oaks before I can protect them. I am interested to see how they overwinter in her windy, cold yard this coming winter. I told her of course what I'm doing, in case they don't make it. I gave her wild evergreen Mags too.


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RE: Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiana

Poaky,

Wow your really trying to stretch those late drop in zone 5b, lol.

I read about the late drop, appears to be Fusiformis/Virginiana hybrid but one that holds its acorns late into December. My Fusiformis are from acorns collected in northern Texas in late December.


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RE: Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiana

Poaky,

In case you missed this on another post.

I gathered the acorns for this tree late Dec 2012, so it's not yet a year old. I gave it to a friend. It will stay in pot outside in winter unless gets down to 10 degrees or lower to prevent root ball freezing.

Photobucket Pictures, Images and Photos

Quercus Fusiformis extreme north Texas variety. I also have some Okahoma variations of the Fusiformis as well.


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RE: Most successful try at Live oak that favors Q. Virginiana

I never saw the above tree, and you mentioning it before. From what you mentioned, and I agree with, it seems our trees are of similar seed source. They mentioned (Mossy oaks) for Texans to take notice. I looked at my biggest of the 2 nicest late drops and the wood seems like it isn't limp and tender on either. I guess I should quit blabbering about it and see how it does in time, maybe adding an update in January, maybe the 15th of Jan. I want to thank David for the article. I got baby trees from one or 2 of those Virginia located Q. Virginiana before I tried the late drop L.O. They survived until around January or around-abouts then. My friends yard with the Late drop looks sad. Either the leaves are gone from wind, or beasts chopped them down. I never protected them. Yesterday I went to her yard but didn't know I would be beforehand, and brought no protection. It was dark so I could only say the headlights showed no leaves. My yellow leaved from the same batch late drops have their yellow leaves though. I will try 2 more in her yard in spring, if the present ones are dead. I will have to bring protection at planting time. I will start a new thread, or any repliers can. David I love the pics in your post, a couple trees were on the Virginia big tree website, but they were small pics. Those of the multiple trees (groves) aren't on the V big trees at all. They look healthier without the moss draped, but the moss in just some lower areas is nice. I recently saw a bigger pic of the champion Compton's oak, and am glad I have 3 of them, the pic someone posted shows the branching pattern, and it is really great.


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