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Weeping Willow Damage

Posted by daisy_lee 5 (My Page) on
Fri, Apr 6, 12 at 13:25

I have a 3 year old 8 foot tall weeping willow tree, which is growing in the Berkshire Mountains at my weekend house. The tree was growing great, trunk strong with many leaves emerging. Today I saw that the crown of the tree was broken along with many branches on the top. What could have caused this damage? Are there any animals that are known to climb weeping willow trees and chew or break off the branches? I am trying to root the branches in hopes of planting more trees around.

Any advice would be appreciated!
Thanks!
Carol


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Weeping Willow Damage

Animal damage -- I guess in theory a porcupine might, they sometimes chew bark, I THINK. They don't live around here, so I'm not sure.

More likely either wind/snow/storm/ice damage. Willows are notoriously weak wood, and they break easily.

Yes, the broken branches will probably root in moist soil. Long term, you are probably setting yourself up for more of the same. DEFINITELY a tree to keep far, far away from any structures or driveways, so that when the inevitable happens there isn't expensive collateral damage.


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RE: Weeping Willow Damage

they are notoriously weak wooded..

for all we know ... a skunk sneezed .... and it broke the leader ..

you should think long and hard .... about planting a lot of willow ... because there is no reason.. every one you plant.. will do this.. in any wind storm ... severe or not ...plus rain.. hail .. snow load.. ice... etc ...

i moved to get away from a giant willow at the old house .. lol ..

ken

ps: animals are not stupid.. they do not climb until the tree breaks ... they kinda figure it out sooner.. rather than later ... and there is nothing up there an animal would want ... unless it was some flying beaver ...


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RE: Weeping Willow Damage

Flying beavers aside, porcupine is a reasonable guess, if it was indeed a critter. They gnaw on a wide variety of trees although they are especially troublesome on conifers, especially your favorite conifers. They really mess with those!

I love the look of a big weeping willow, especially in the winter when the golden twig color predominates. Especially too, I love them from a distance, on someone else's property!

+oM


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RE: Weeping Willow Damage

We found out that it was a moose that caused the damage to the tree and more damage this past week.

Many thanks to all who responded!


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RE: Weeping Willow Damage

a climbing moose ... lol .. those pesky 1500 pound animals sneaking around.. lol ..

you might want to be sure there isnt a squirrel hanging around..

check out the link for proper ID ...

and have a great day ...

ken

Here is a link that might be useful: link


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RE: Weeping Willow Damage

Moose are tall... its definitely possible they wrecked an 8 foot tree.


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RE: Weeping Willow Damage

Moose snacks, eh. Makes sense.

How do you keep a moose away from something it wants to eat? Given their size and strength, you probably don't.


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RE: Weeping Willow Damage

How do you keep a moose away from something it wants to eat?

===>>> secret russian agent???

ken


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RE: Weeping Willow Damage

"Ah, you sound like you should be plotting 'big trouble for moose and squirrel'" - Murphy Brown


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