Return to the Trees Forum | Post a Follow-Up

 o
TriColor Beech Scientific Name & Sun Tolerance

Posted by whaas 5a Milwaukee (My Page) on
Thu, Apr 22, 10 at 16:50

I'm a little confused as to the scientific name of the tri-color beech that is offered today by nurseries. Are there various versions?

Also I know Tricolor is best situated with partial shade, but what about a full day of sun?

I'm not worried about the vibrance of the pink throughout the season, I'm just looking for a good purple leafed tree that gets sizable (at least 20 x 15) but not a cherry.


Follow-Up Postings:

 o
RE: TriColor Beech Scientific Name & Sun Tolerance

  • Posted by bboy USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA (My Page) on
    Thu, Apr 22, 10 at 18:29

The common, pink, purple and white one is 'Purpurea Tricolor'. It is a tall-growing tree, much larger than 20' where and when able to develop fully.

The white and pink tend to diminish over time. The purple goes bronze during the summer.


 o
RE: TriColor Beech Scientific Name & Sun Tolerance

  • Posted by whaas 5a Milwaukee (My Page) on
    Thu, Apr 22, 10 at 21:41

Would that be the official cultivar name?

Bronze like some of the purple leaf Malus cultivars look like? How about foilage retention?

Whoa, sorry for all the questions, lol.

I have a an area with plenty of space, just don't know if the foilage will struggle in full sun (meaning 12 hours)


 o
RE: TriColor Beech Scientific Name & Sun Tolerance

  • Posted by bboy USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA (My Page) on
    Thu, Apr 22, 10 at 22:30

Yes, bronze like some of the older, inferior purple crabs and purple plums. Becomes a copper beech with pink highlights.

I do not live in a hot climate where this tree might burn, have not seen under what conditions that occurs. But even here, it fades. Maybe it sometimes burns here, too, and I didn't pick up on it. With our quite dry conditions starting after 4th of July celebrations get rained out, many broad-leaved trees and other moist climate plants start to deteriorate, show various effects. Even the native red alder does not make it through the summer without stressing out, on many sites.

Recently I read the variegation is encouraged by stronger light levels. So, you need a place with enough light to keep it colorful, but not so much that it burns.

Maybe north of a tall building.


 o
RE: TriColor Beech Scientific Name & Sun Tolerance

beech = fagus ... so add that in front of what ron said ...

i am a collector.. one of anything is requisite ...

I HAVE TWO OF THESE .... there is plenty in your yard to thrill the bee-gee-bees out of you .. when this one starts getting ratty ...

but i would not be without the two i have for june and july ...

i am sure you have seen the pix.. but for others.. check below.. ignore the dwarf.. they are endemic to my garden ...

ken
Photobucket
Photobucket


 o
RE: TriColor Beech Scientific Name & Sun Tolerance

  • Posted by whaas 5a Milwaukee (My Page) on
    Fri, Apr 23, 10 at 9:30

I knew Fagus but wasn't sure if its european or american.

Your images are acutally the first to come up on google image search.

So bottom line, I'm hearing it looks fantastic May - July and if dry/hot weather hits you have a ratty tree for late summer going into fall.

As long as it doesn't defoliate I'm ok with it. I need more "colorful" trees to plant. I have done what I can with habits and textures with other trees. I'm quickly running out of room though with my just over 1/3 acre so I want to make some good decisions with my last few trees.

bboy, I know exactly what you mean with the inferior malus cultivars...but those start to actually defolitate from scab or rust. Are you just making a color comparison?


 o
RE: TriColor Beech Scientific Name & Sun Tolerance

dont forget that scorch will be worsened from transplant.. until fully established ...

ken


 o
RE: TriColor Beech Scientific Name & Sun Tolerance

  • Posted by whaas 5a Milwaukee (My Page) on
    Fri, Apr 23, 10 at 12:31

Dumb question, does scorch cause premature defoiliation?

Ken, do your tricolors defoliate prior to fall?


 o
RE: TriColor Beech Scientific Name & Sun Tolerance

  • Posted by bboy USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA (My Page) on
    Fri, Apr 23, 10 at 13:34

The pictures Ken keeps posting show a very highly colored example, apparently his conditions are excellent for this tree.

Somebody I know out here had a newly planted one lose the white component almost immediately, after planting it out maybe 7 or 8 feet tall.

I don't notice these burning or dropping in my area so much as fading - it amounts to a copper beech with some pink flaming. Larger trees here can be recognized from a bit of a distance by the weird, halo-like effect produced by the variegation - of what would otherwise be another blah copper beech. If you look at multiple internet pictures you will see its parameters.


 o
RE: TriColor Beech Scientific Name & Sun Tolerance

Does the same thing happen with dawycks purple towards the end of the season? Because Julie of Treegrowersdiary.com wrote that her purple beech died so maybe it was just the end of season bronzing that is common here.


 o
RE: TriColor Beech Scientific Name & Sun Tolerance

  • Posted by whaas 5a Milwaukee (My Page) on
    Fri, Apr 23, 10 at 16:36

Thanks for all the input...I just got back from the nursery and most the stock was poorly branched.

I ended up finding this goregously branched paperbark maple hiding in the back that was put out to stock....I snatched that thing right up!


 o
RE: TriColor Beech Scientific Name & Sun Tolerance

  • Posted by bboy USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA (My Page) on
    Fri, Apr 23, 10 at 21:01

European beech is sensitive to less perfect soil drainage, that might be why the one died. Or it got too dry.


 o
RE: TriColor Beech Scientific Name & Sun Tolerance

The "tri-color" (not the scientific name, thought I saw Rose-Marg????? something once) foliage is pretty darned interesting.

Folks plant Bradford Pears all the time for the 13-20 days worth of flowers they have. Tri-Color is GREAT for a few months out of the year if you like that type of thing, and I do.

Next county over someone in the parks department likes them. I've seen two. Later in the season when the pink whitens out one of them crisps up a little. Its not the most attractive thing. The other just faded to the white edge. My tiny 1 foot grafted one stayed strong all year, the pink did fade but all 30 or so of its leaves stayed attractive, weird. Its on the corner of the dampish part of the yard. I gave it about 1/2 gallon of water every 4 days or so w/o rain. Gets sun probably 10am to 4pm or 5pm over the summer.


 o
RE: TriColor Beech Scientific Name & Sun Tolerance

i do have pure yellow mineral sand ... very deep ... incredibly fast drainage ... and i rarely water established tree .... so i can 'see' what ron is saying about my z5.. and his PNW

the ONLY thing that caused leaf loss/damage in my 15 years with it.. was a severe hail storm ...

otherwise they hang on ...

otherwise.. this is definitely one that i would buy in person.. rather than mail order ... to see what you are really getting ...

ken


 o
RE: TriColor Beech Scientific Name & Sun Tolerance

  • Posted by whaas 5a Milwaukee (My Page) on
    Sat, Apr 24, 10 at 10:53

All, great info...I'm still on the lookout. Last year I found one that looked fantastic but didn't know enough about them.


 o
RE: TriColor Beech Scientific Name & Sun Tolerance

  • Posted by bboy USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA (My Page) on
    Sun, Apr 25, 10 at 12:59

'Tricolor' may be extinct. Anyone other than a specialist trying to track down this now apparently extremely rare cultivar will be dealing with 'Purpurea Tricolor' ('Roseomarginata').


 o
RE: TriColor Beech Scientific Name & Sun Tolerance

Here is a pic of mine in the summer. Summer time pics of these usually don't make the web sites lol.

I don't find it unattractive, just more run of the mill. Mine probably gets more moisture than most being close the bottom of a long gentle hill. It IS in the sun through the late morning and middle of the afternoon though. Perhaps the two offset.

As a side note, my little fella had very little pink to its leaves this year after a cold wet winter and wet spring but looked much like Ken's last year.

Color isn't perfect off my confusing new Samsung Galaxy cell phone but you get the idea.
Photobucket


 o
RE: TriColor Beech Scientific Name & Sun Tolerance

  • Posted by brandon7 6b (like 7b now) TN (My Page) on
    Sun, Aug 1, 10 at 21:50

According to Bob Fincham, a well known and respected collector and founder/owner of Coenosium Gardens,

"Fagus sylvatica ‘Tricolor’ is not known to exist in this country. In fact it is only rumored to still be present in France. ‘Tricolor’ is a white-leafed tree, with each leaf possessing a few green spots and a pink margin. It is probably lost to cultivation. The tree sold under that name in this country is really ‘Roseomarginata’, a purple-leafed beech with an irregular pink margin, becoming somewhat bronzed by the end of summer with the pink fading. ‘Purpurea Tricolor’ is an attempt to bridge the incorrect name of ‘Tricolor’ with the correct name of ‘Roseomarginata’, which it received in 1888."

So, Fagus sylvatica ‘Roseomarginata’ is likely the most correct name of the trees you are seeing at nurseries.


 o
RE: TriColor Beech Scientific Name & Sun Tolerance

  • Posted by whaas 5a Milwaukee (My Page) on
    Mon, Aug 2, 10 at 9:27

Although the color isn't attractive, as long as its not scrotched or defoliating who cares if it loses its purple and pink margins, right? Long as it lasts a couple months.

I have a serviceberry that is struggling...Fagus sylvatica ‘Roseomarginata’ is waiting in line.


 o
RE: TriColor Beech Scientific Name & Sun Tolerance

  • Posted by botann z8 SEof Seattle (My Page) on
    Mon, Aug 2, 10 at 10:47

Mine is about twenty feet tall. Here's a branch.

Fagus sylvatica,'Roseomarginata'


 o
RE: TriColor Beech Scientific Name & Sun Tolerance

Color of one at Missouri Botanical Gardens a couple of weeks ago.

Photobucket


 o Post a Follow-Up

Please Note: Only registered members are able to post messages to this forum.

    If you are a member, please log in.

    If you aren't yet a member, join now!


Return to the Trees Forum

Information about Posting

  • You must be logged in to post a message. Once you are logged in, a posting window will appear at the bottom of the messages. If you are not a member, please register for an account.
  • Posting is a two-step process. Once you have composed your message, you will be taken to the preview page. You will then have a chance to review your post, make changes and upload photos.
  • After posting your message, you may need to refresh the forum page in order to see it.
  • Before posting copyrighted material, please read about Copyright and Fair Use.
  • We have a strict no-advertising policy!
  • If you would like to practice posting or uploading photos, please visit our Test forum.
  • If you need assistance, please Contact Us and we will be happy to help.


Learn more about in-text links on this page here