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Why are my beautiful mimosa trees dying?

Posted by scarediecats (My Page) on
Mon, Jul 8, 13 at 12:11

I have loved mimosa trees since I was a child so now that I am grown I have planted them all along my driveway (yes, I live far enough out in the country so that they are not a nuisance to my neighbors). I live close to Nashville, TN. The problem is, it seems that every year I loose at least one of them and have to replace the tree or let it start the re-growth process. Now, one of my biggest and oldest trees - at least 5 years old or more - has begun to die. It was in full bloom at the beginning of the summer and looked beautiful but now it has lost over half its leaves. There are three main trunks to this particular tree - so I guess you could say there are three trees in one. There is a white foam on all three of the trunks. Should I could cut down the two “sick” trunks (trees) - the one with no leaves left on them - and leave the third trunk (tree) - which is the only healthy part left? I have seen little, tiny green bugs on my smaller trees - where some of the leaves are turning brown. I don’t want to spray the tree with insecticide at this time of year because it is full of butterflies, bees and hummingbirds. The trees are so beautiful once they get so very large and full of their flowers - it is heart breaking to see them die. I hold my breath every year!! I see wild mimosa trees around our land and town every year that always seem healthy. I grew up with mimosa trees that you couldn’t kill!! Why are mine dying? What can I do to prevent this from happening again? Thank you for your help.


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Why are my beautiful mimosa trees dying?

its hard to 'see' anything w/o a pic

why next to the drive... and what does the driveway do to trees that are supposed to be dormant in winter??? .. sometimes winter damage does not make itself apparent until summer heat ....

ken


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RE: Why are my beautiful mimosa trees dying?

I can understand your fondness for mimosa. They are pretty when in bloom and the tiny leaflets give the tree a certain look. However, mimosas (technically, Albizia julibrissin, not a true mimosa) are a "SEVERE THREAT" to the environment here in Tennessee. The are causing significant loss of native flora and fauna. Your mimosa are only "far enough out in the country so that they are not a nuisance to (your) neighbors" if you don't consider plants and animals to be your neighbors! If I were you, I would consider the loss of such a pest plant as a gift from and for nature!

Here is a link that might be useful: Invasive Species List by the TN-EPPC


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RE: Why are my beautiful mimosa trees dying?

I agree with Brandon, these trees are bad news. When you introduce non natives bad thing can and do happen. For example look at the American Chestnut....you should be familiar with that story since you are living in the southern Appalachian region. billions of trees died all because someone thought it would be a good idea to plant a Chinese chestnut which ended up carrying the fungus that killed all those trees. I would say have an open mind and consider planting the natives...there are so many great options.


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RE: Why are my beautiful mimosa trees dying?

i loved the one in my grandmother's backyard (great for climbing) when i was a child but now i am not so fond of them because of their aggressive nature.
there is a disease that may be what your trees are manifesting symptoms of called mimosa wilt.
see link.

Here is a link that might be useful: mimosa wilt disease


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RE: Why are my beautiful mimosa trees dying?

Jeff_al…thank you for the ONLY informative response. Though I have studied the “Mimosa wilt disease” I came to this website in hopes of receiving “deeper insight” from an experienced arborist as to what other things I could do concerning the care of my Mimosa trees. I wish my trees were invasive - In 7 years I haven't had any offspring come up.
Ken_adrian; I did post a photo…I don’t know why it didn’t show up. I planted my trees next to the driveway because the green and pink canopy and beautiful fragrance make the drive up the driveway more than pleasant. It’s just my husband and myself so there’s no traffic to speak of - so no heat or exhaust. The driveway is gravel, very long and is far enough away from the trees to prevent root damage. As far as winter damage - some of my trees are 5-7 years old before they die. I wouldn’t think the winters are too harsh on the Mimosa trees since they are so very abundant in this part of TN (as well as all the way to Texas…my husband and I make the drive often). You can’t drive the highways (or walk through the woods) of TN without seeing Mimosa trees everywhere.
Brandon7 - as I stated in my post - my reason for not treating the trees at this time is that I’d rather lose the tree than kill the bees, humming birds and butterflies that love the trees. As far as these “dangerous” trees negatively effecting nature…I don’t think I will take on the “guilt trip” or pick up the “quest to rid” TN of such danger (since the Mimosa trees have apparently become very copious without my help). Not to mention, it seems your time would be better spent sharing your comments with the mega garden centers here in TN that sell many of those undesirable trees/plants (listed in your link) as fast as they can reorder them, or, taking a saw out into the woods of TN rather than fretting over my 7 Mimosa trees. FYI - For your peace of mind, we keep our land groomed regularly - thereby reducing the offspring (I’ve never seen a Mimosa tree on our land unless I planted it) as well as seeds to be carried off. What plants/trees I have on my land are contained as needed. What I would consider a “gift” would be to receive a knowledgeable answer to my question on how to keep the trees healthy rather than a pretentious opinion as to how one “feels” about the Mimosa tree. Thank you for the link you included but because I research any tree/plant I put on my land I know the “reputation” of the Mimosa tree and have know of it‘s invasive nature since I was a child (thus the consideration for my neighbors). I also know the “reputation” (from research and my experiences) of the wisteria (wisteria sinesis), burning bush (euonymus alatus), butterfly bush (buddleja davidii), honeysuckle (lonicera japonica), and bamboo (phyllostachys edulis), to name a few…yet these are just a few of the examples of “offensive plantings” I choose to have thriving in my landscape. Greenthumbzdude…rather than be redundant please see my response to Brandon7 above…I will again say, I, (nor my 7 Mimosa trees) are responsible for adding to the propagation of the abundant Mimosa trees population here in TN, (nor the fact that there are almost as many non-native trees/plants as there are native ones in many of our states).
I did not ask anyone’s opinion on how they “felt” about the Mimosa tree. I know there will always be diffident people who feel the need to give their opinion in such forums. Unfortunately I mistook this website as being “the place to come” to get knowledgeable responses from educated arborist to such questions as, “how to prevent certain diseases in certain trees”, thereby protecting the trees, which in return, protects the rest of “nature”. From the vacant responses I’ve received to my one simple question I see I’ve come to the wrong place. A website like this should be reserved for the purpose it was intended for, so maybe in the future the questions should be responded to with educated answers - not supercilious rhetoric.


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RE: Why are my beautiful mimosa trees dying?

sick Mimosa tree


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RE: Why are my beautiful mimosa trees dying?

Looks like mimosa wilt. There is little to be done - also don't replant one in that location as the pathogen is soil-borne and will likely re-infect new ones. You could send samples to a diagnostic lab if you want to confirm that it is Fusarium.

We have lots of mimosas here (none on my property) and I can't say I've heard of it displacing any particular native species. Are there any specifics on this in TN? Personally, I don't care for them - though I am interested in some related species such as A. coreana. I understand why people feel the need to "educate" others about the invasiveness of this species, given the hype, but I think the real impact of some invasive plants has yet to be determined. That said, there are some real "bad boys" in my opinion - cogongrass and Japanese climbing fern for example. By the way, one of my favorite trees is Populus alba, which doesn't even produce viable seed in North America (except rare hybrids with aspens), yet is banned in some states and considered a Class 1 invasive. Why? - because it produces suckers up to 100' from the original parent tree. Some agencies wrongly assume it produces seedling offspring and classify its invasiveness based on this mis-information...Lastly, you should see the debates on here about eastern red cedar! There are those who believe it should be banned from planting where it is native! It is even on some "official" invasive species lists in states where it is the only native conifer!


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RE: Why are my beautiful mimosa trees dying?

"I can't say I've heard of it displacing any particular native species"

Around here mimosa and various native sumac occupy the same sites. When mimosa gets large enough and begins forming a colony, the native sumac cannot colonize the area. Do you have sumac in FL?


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RE: Why are my beautiful mimosa trees dying?

Yeah, they are invasive in Florida as well. My assumption is they are on Missouri's list as well as along 270 between Hazelwood and Maryland Heights there are plenty growing in formerly natural areas.

Honeysuckle bushes are the worst IMO. You can see a difference in the woodlines as soon as you are sixty or so miles out of town.

Back to mimosas, maybe in your part of TN the wilt keeps em in check. Even here they are quick to grow, quick to die first colinizer type plants.

And yeah, if I were on the healthcare forum asking for the best brand of smokes or for studies to aid my attemot to get my property rezoned for hazardous waste dumps they would give me some flack.

Is that constructive? I dunno. Walk into the neighborhood bar or church with plans for highway expansion right through main street they will probably attempt to talk me out of it as well. Group think? Maybe. Society trying to get folks to do what is for the greater good? Maybe.

I am not on either end of extreme. I have acer palmatums. I also have a (gasp!) Bradford. Like you say, they are still being sold so it is not like w/o peer pressure and regukation any effect can be had. But I am not planting more invasives.

Here is a link that might be useful: ufl.edu


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RE: Why are my beautiful mimosa trees dying?

Thank you for the informative responses that have followed my last post. Salicaceae; Your statement… “Mimosa wilt…the pathogen is soil-borne and will likely re-infect new ones. You could send samples to a diagnostic lab if you want to confirm that it is Fusarium” …made me realize that I had missed the information that states that the problem is “soil-borne”. That shines the light on what I have been overlooking all this time. See - that is the point of my “putting myself out there” and asking for help - on a gardening website - for my Mimosa trees (especially knowing how some people feel about them)…an answer that will help prevent further harm to these trees as well as the guilt and disappointment that comes with watching them die. I did not realize I was on a forum that “focused” on enlightening people of invasive plants/trees - I though it was a forum where I could get information to help me keep my trees healthy. I know before hand the reputation, origin, and habits - good and bad - of everything I plant on my land because I do put so much research into what I plant before I plant it. I read every “opinion” I can find - and do not limit myself to rehearsed “biases”. I then make my decisions as to what to plant or not to plant.

j0nd03: we have Winged Sumac Scientific (Rhus copallinum) in abundance here in TN. My land was “packed” with them when we bought it. You couldn’t even walk through them they were so thick. Because they were so thick there was nothing else growing on the land except for a Sycamore tree here and there. They now only line my land. I think such a dense cluster of Sumac would easily give a Mimosa tree a run for it’s money.

toronado3800; though I have some Honeysuckle bushes remaining that were on my land when I bought it I agree that they are very dangerous because they are so obviously aggressive and damaging to everything they attach to. I keep a well contained cluster just for the smell and beauty of the flowers…otherwise our land maintenance consists of regular removal of any other vines found. Even vines that line the woods - that do not belong to us - but connect to our land.

Here is a little “hidden nugget” about the Mimosa tree.

Michael Tierra L.Ac., O.M.D., Founder of the American Herbalists Guild
(I am adding the website because I have only inserted part of the lecture here. Further reading is recommended because it is highly informative and interesting!)
http://www.planetherbs.com/specific-herbs/albizzia-the-tree-of-happiness.html

The flowers and bark of the mimosa tree (Albizia julibrissin) are among the most valued of Chinese botanicals for relieving anxiety, stress and depression. Commonly found growing throughout temperate zones in the Western United States albizia is native to China, Persia, Korea and Japan. It is traditionally known as "huan hua" (flowers) and "he huan pi" (bark) and popularly as the "happiness herb," and "collective happiness bark" by the Chinese. Recently some Chinese herbalists and acupuncturists have even called it 'herbal Prozac. Its use was first documented in the Shen Nong Ben Cao (Divine Husbandman's Classic of the Materia Medica) during the 2nd century for its mood supportive and calming properties as well as a tonic. Chinese people traditionally recommend its use for anyone who is suffering from grief as a result of a severe loss.
Both the bark and the flowers of albizia are used as a calming sedative in Oriental traditional medicine. Categorized in the Chinese Materia Medica as a calming spirit herb, the bark is thought to 'anchor' the spirit, while the flowers lighten it. The flowers have also been used for the treatment of insomnia, amnesia, sore throat, and contusion in Oriental traditional medicine (Kang, et al) as well as depression, melancholy and anxiety.
Considering the proliferation of antidepressant drugs throughout the Western world with their increasingly recognized adverse effects, it's wonderful that nature has, in abundance, a safer and better alternative probably growing in close proximity to one's doorstep. In my opinion, albizia offers a more profound effect in treating depression and anxiety than the two most commonly promoted herbs, St Johnswort (Hypericum perforatum) and Kava (Piper methisticum) and thus should be more widely used.

(ref. Wikipedia)...
The Mimosa SEEDS are also used as a food for livestock and by wildlife, and the sweet-scented flowers are a good nectar source for honeybees, humming birds and butterflies.

As you can see it’s a very different perspective on what people usually recite about the Mimosa trees. (NOTE: As you read the information about the Mimosa tree you might want to compare it to this one “sneaky” yet popular example - I’ll give just one example since I‘m sure no one is really interested in reading the list I have compiled of other, invasive or “truly” non-native (per state) plants/trees that are favored and collected by many gardeners - in every state). Gymnocladus chinensis: The unroasted PODS and SEEDS of the Gymnocladus chinensis are toxic: Also, It is "NATIVE" to the Midwest of North America …The Midwestern United States, as defined by the United States Census Bureau, consists of 12 states... Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota and Wisconsin.) Just a side note…Tennessee is NOT on that list.

Again, thanks to those of you who focused on trying to help me help the trees “I” love without adding condemnation.


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RE: Why are my beautiful mimosa trees dying?

Scarediecats, I'm sorry to hear about your mimosas: I too have always loved them since I was a child, in fact it was mimosas that peaked my interest and love of gardening. You could try planting some in large tubs...but ONLY using a good potting soil, such as miracle grow, etc, and above all not using any soil from the yard, etc.. That would probably prevent them from getting the wilt (from which there is no cure) I have had some for years in tubs that do well and bloom too. If you do plant them that way though, you'll probably have to repot every couple years or so, well at least root prune a little to keep them in the same sized pot, and add new potting soil. I think that would be the best option for you as the fusarium wilt disease is pretty prevalent in the South. Actually, planting them in a tub is nice, because they wouldn't get as large and you can actually see the blossoms better and from up close!

I hope this helps you. Good luck.


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RE: Why are my beautiful mimosa trees dying?

Cultivar 'Union' is resistant to Fusarium, so Google says.

I would like to see a case where Mimosa is pushing out climax vegetation; obviously it can have an effect on the non-climax species such as sumac. But if you get right down to it, sumac is "invasive" anyway, it just happens to be native.


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RE: Why are my beautiful mimosa trees dying?

Scarediecats,

I'm afraid you have made some very poor assumptions. My comments were not based on "feelings" unless you consider a general concern for our planet and its future as mere "feelings". If you had taken the time to review my link, you'd see that Albizia julibrissin is indeed on the Tennessee Exotic Pest Plant Council's list of Severe Threat invasive plants. I have had enough dealings with that organization to know that their analysis is based very solidly on science. If one is aware of their surrounds on hikes or just driving down the road, just about anywhere in this state, there will be little room to doubt the existence of the problem.

Your presumption that, since you don't see seedlings popping up on your property, your trees are not invasive highlights your lack of understanding of the problem. Unless you are monitoring a few square miles around your property, you have very little way to really judge the impact you may be having on the environment.

One thing that you said is somewhat relative. Since the problem of mimosas is so severe here in Tennessee, your plants are the "drop in the ocean". Like throwing out your hamburger wrapper on a heavily littered road, your actions may be lost in the vastness of the issue. Whether that means your actions are less problematic, may be debatable; I can see a little of both sides of the argument.

Believing that the nurseries that sell the trees are at fault is somewhat like blaming the fastfood restaurant where that wrapper, in the above example, came from for selling the burger in the fist place. As long as there are customers who either don't care, or who don't know better, and buy these plants, there will be someone somewhere willing to sell them.
_______________________________

I love Toronado's advice-on-the-best-smokes-in-the-healthcare-forum example. That's right on the money!
_______________________________

"But if you get right down to it, sumac is "invasive" anyway, it just happens to be native."

Wow, that's one more oxymoronic statement (unless Famartin is using the term invasive completely different that the rest of us here).


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RE: Why are my beautiful mimosa trees dying?

I live near the Tenn/Georgia state line south of Chattanooga. These mimosa trees are all over the place. Now that I look for them, it seems like every other tree I pass on the road is one of these plants. I've even got an old one on my land. Its in rough shape so I will probably cut it down this fall. I didn't know they were invasive.


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RE: Why are my beautiful mimosa trees dying?

I live near the Tenn/Georgia state line south of Chattanooga. These mimosa trees are all over the place. Now that I look for them, it seems like every other tree I pass on the road is one of these plants. I've even got an old one on my land. Its in rough shape so I will probably cut it down this fall. I didn't know they were invasive.


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RE: Why are my beautiful mimosa trees dying?

I wonder why?


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RE: Why are my beautiful mimosa trees dying?

"I wonder why (these mimosa trees are all over the place)?"

Ya recon it could be because they're invasive?? Bet ya never saw that one coming.


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RE: Why are my beautiful mimosa trees dying?

Kudos to you Scarediecats:
for politely and firmly cherishing a creation of this earth enough to defend and care for it throughout it's life. PEOPLE : ANY plant can be invasive and a hazard to allergy sufferers. We live in an ecosystem, not a plastic bubble. You may do so if you please. If you haven't the care to help a fellow responsible gardener and simply filled with hate for their cherished choice of botany. Please, kindly shut up and complain on a relevant thread.


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RE: Why are my beautiful mimosa trees dying?

Huh? M

This post was edited by Mackel-in-DFW on Wed, May 21, 14 at 1:29


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RE: Why are my beautiful mimosa trees dying?

Nevermind. M

This post was edited by Mackel-in-DFW on Wed, May 21, 14 at 1:32


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RE: Why are my beautiful mimosa trees dying?

ummm... what?


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RE: Why are my beautiful mimosa trees dying?

One of those times I am glad I subscribed to updates by email because those two posts by Mackel were interesting!


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RE: Why are my beautiful mimosa trees dying?

Now just wait a minute....

There is absolutely no hate on this board! People like to carelessly throw that word around these days, calling anyone who says something that you disagree with as a "hater".

You won't find a better board on the internet for finding more dedicated, thoughtful, sincere and helpful gardeners. I love this place! I have been helped so much, and believe me, they have tons of patience and compassion on here.

But when someone comes on and mentions a plant that they know hurts other plants, do you expect them to bite their tongue and not give their opinion? You can't control people like that. People are people. There's all different kinds of personalities on here and you should be tolerant of all of them.

I am appalled that anyone would describe the responses here as hate-filled. Good grief. How in the world does describing a plant as invasive rise to the level of hate?

Getting back to the original post, if you look up Golden Raintree, you might find that they sort of look similar to the Mimosa, well, in my opinion. Look into planting them...I have one, and it's adorable. They're nearly pest-free, tolerant of all kinds of soils, wind tolerant, and grow pretty quickly. Their leaves are stunning....

Good luck, and I am sorry for the loss of your trees. I lost 11 of my shrubs this winter, and I know how it feels.....


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RE: Why are my beautiful mimosa trees dying?

here is a picture of a mimosa that I've had for 21 years. I plant it in the ground in the Spring and dig it up and store it in the garage over the winter here in Portland, Me.


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RE: Why are my beautiful mimosa trees dying?

My tree almost died from the awful winter we had. Usually by this time of year it is blooming and the hummingbirds are all over it. We only have some small amounts of leaves growing on the main branches and trunk. The picture is one of it's residents from last year.Any suggestions? We planted it in 2002 from a small cutting and is now over 15 ft high. We love it and so do our neighbors. Very beautiful! We live in central Indiana.


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RE: Why are my beautiful mimosa trees dying?

It's a little amazing to me that people, like ClaraShane, try to "defend" actions or issues for which they next to no understanding. I see that so much these days, and it seems to me to be, by far, our number one problem as a civilization. Some worry about supervolcanoes, asteroid impacts, or mega tsunamis...I worry more about those that don't care enough to get a basic understanding of what they are talking about before jumping on the bandwagon.


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RE: Why are my beautiful mimosa trees dying?

The wilt has kept them down here, they used to be everywhere when I was a kid, now the Tallow trees have taken over and I am glad since our native trees have virtually no fall color. Come and get all Prunus carolina you want from my house since it is taking over, such a good native, maybe it and the native trumpet vine will strangle each other out. I hope. Where are all the pests and diseases to keep them in check? Apparently, now here. I spray it all with herbicide and have to do it repeatedly to keep it from taking over.

Notice the people who dominate each forum, like brandon7 here, and ken_adrian on just about EVERY GW forum, click on their name and go to their page, you get a long diatribe about themselves, does that tell you something? Who is brandon to tell someone that they know next to nothing? Nothing but hatefulness. Check out digdirt on the tomato forum and the great poobah on the container forum- same thing. Of course, nobody beats ken_adrian, aka socrates, with 6626 IN TOTAL POST. It seems that ego is by far, our number one problem as a civilization. And using manners is the next.
Go ahead brandon, let 'er rip, I KNOW you will have something to say, you always do.

Here is a link that might be useful: Socrates


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RE: Why are my beautiful mimosa trees dying?

You're not exactly a ray of sunshine either, fairfield8619.


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RE: Why are my beautiful mimosa trees dying?

So how do you see post count? I'm curious to see my number.

Arktrees


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RE: Why are my beautiful mimosa trees dying?

  • Posted by hoovb z9 Southern CA (My Page) on
    Mon, Jun 2, 14 at 11:17

Great thread, thanks!

Arktrees, do a search on your username and look at the count of the results.


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RE: Why are my beautiful mimosa trees dying?

I don't know why mimosas are said to be invasive. Mimosas are a pioneering species. And as such, they move forward preparing for the establishment of forest. They are nitrogen fixers. You see them where the land has been disturbed. For example, I see them by the thousands lining roads and highways around me. However, when I go into some of our nearby national forest land, I seldom see any.

To say that mimosas are invasive is pure ignorance. Mother nature is simply trying to take disturbed land back to forest. Miimosas are simply part of that equation.


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RE: Why are my beautiful mimosa trees dying?

poolecw,

"For example, I see them by the thousands lining roads and highways around me." There's your answer. There are plenty of native species that would have occupied those locations but were displaced. That is what "invasive" IS by biological definition. You might want to reconsider your statement.

With that said, there were many many mimosa growing wild where I grew up. I did not know they were not native. BUT there seems to be fewer in number and size. It would seem their pest may be winning at least in that area. Now other things are showing up instead.

Arktrees


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RE: Why are my beautiful mimosa trees dying?

If the roads and highways weren't built, then those mimosa lining them would not be there. Take a look at the population density of the mimosa near disturbed land and compare it to the population density of the mimosa in forest land. Like I said earlier, the mimosa is a pioneering species. It is a precursor to forest establishment. One a forest starts to develop in an area, the misosa will die out.

I have not the time or desire to debate you about it. Call the tree what you may. I'm simply saying that they serve a purpose. You should read Bill Mollison's "Intro to Permaculture". He mentions the mimosa specifically.


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RE: Why are my beautiful mimosa trees dying?

poolecw,
By Biological Science, the "DEFINITION" of invasive fits exactly what you said in your own words. You stated "I don't know why mimosas are said to be invasive.", and I explain exactly how they are invasive. Whether you choose to accept the science or not, is another matter.

Don't really care "I have not the time or desire to debate you about it". All that tells me is that you know you have been caught out. You don't agree, that's fine. You don't like it, that's fine. Mimosa is not going away as much as some may want them to gone. But you can get off your lofty horse now.

Arktrees


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RE: Why are my beautiful mimosa trees dying?

You know ilovemytrees, when you allow people to act out with impunity, then you are part of the problem too.
All I ask is for people to not be so nasty, disagreement is good and constructive, and to not be holier-than-thou cranks. Both brandon and ken consistently talk down to people like this is their own venue, even folks who come to GW for the first time looking for help. Apparently you find this acceptable, I do not and will call them down when I see it happening, although I will miss a lot of their nastiness since I do not get auto updates all the time like they do, I have other things to attend to rather than always being on GW all the time.


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RE: Why are my beautiful mimosa trees dying?

Interesting that fairfield pleads for people to not be so nasty and then immediately takes a shot at Brandon and Ken for "not having anything better to do than post on gardenweb all the time..." I don't post much but I appreciate the input that Brandon and Ken provide because they seem to be two of the more well-informed posters on this site.


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RE: Why are my beautiful mimosa trees dying?

texan86, "well-informed" huh? Just don't disagree with them or you will get it. The first time I visited the conifer forum way back when, ken was whining about about how people did not like him, he then succeeded in driving many away. I am not nasty to anyone, you will not hear me denigrate anyone like ken does. I'm not the first to have a problem with ken, but I'm almost the only one though who will call him out. And will continue to do so, if he can rant incessantly so can I.


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RE: Why are my beautiful mimosa trees dying?

Fairfield, your posts are making you look like the one that is nasty and whiny. You talk poorly about someone, and in the next sentence you say that you don't denigrate anyone on here. Hmm...


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RE: Why are my beautiful mimosa trees dying?

texan86, you really don't get it, only ken who is a crank and brandon who dominates and talks down to people as if this is HIS show, you sure don't have any problem whining, what's in it for you, why do you defend bad behavior? You are part of the problem.


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RE: Why are my beautiful mimosa trees dying?

Fairfield, if you don't stop trolling (yes, trolling) this forum, I am going to report you. I am sick of you coming on here, for no other reason than to denigrate long-standing, generous members, of whom I've learned a great deal from. You then go on to label other members who disagree with you as a "problem". Additionally, I'm sure the moderators/owners of Gardenweb would be interested in reading how you mock someone's post count on their forums.

I will no longer be responding to you, or to this thread.


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RE: Why are my beautiful mimosa trees dying?

  • Posted by lkz5ia z5 west iowa (My Page) on
    Tue, Jun 3, 14 at 14:51

ilovemytrees -"Getting back to the original post, if you look up Golden Raintree, you might find that they sort of look similar to the Mimosa, well, in my opinion. Look into planting them...I have one, and it's adorable. They're nearly pest-free, tolerant of all kinds of soils, wind tolerant, and grow pretty quickly. Their leaves are stunning"

and a nice thing about Golden raintree is they flower early in life and seed heavily and germinate readily, so you can start growing seedlings off yours in no time.


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