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Need help Identifying this tree...

Posted by JagerKing OHIO (My Page) on
Tue, Jul 15, 14 at 18:19

Can anyone help identify this tree?? Can't give much info, other that it can grow in Ohio.


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Need help Identifying this tree...

Need a close up, but it almost looks like a rather contorted silver maple.


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RE: Need help Identifying this tree...

Definitely need a close up, but the form is reminiscent of "twisty baby" locust. Under good conditions this variety can grow larger than advertised.


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RE: Need help Identifying this tree...

  • Posted by beng z6 western MD (My Page) on
    Wed, Jul 16, 14 at 8:35

Without a better pic, it does look like black locust -- a very nice specimen if so.


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RE: Need help Identifying this tree...

  • Posted by bboy USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA (My Page) on
    Wed, Jul 16, 14 at 17:16

Contorted black locust.


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RE: Need help Identifying this tree...

After some research, I'm still unsure about the difference(s) between contorted black locust ('Tortuosa') and 'Twisty Baby' (aka 'Lace Lady') - the two may be quite similar in habit as they mature. Dirr (Manual of Woody Landscape Plants) says about Twisty Baby, "(I have) observed 20 to 30' high plants; also quite fast-growing, grew 30' high at Milliken Arboretum in about 12 years." Dirr also says that Twisty Baby does not flower but Tortuosa does.


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RE: Need help Identifying this tree...

  • Posted by beng z6 western MD (My Page) on
    Fri, Jul 18, 14 at 9:23

Need a trunk and/or leaf closeup to verify.


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RE: Need help Identifying this tree...

  • Posted by ademink z5a-5b Indianapolis (My Page) on
    Fri, Aug 8, 14 at 12:53

I will tell you that 'Twisty Baby' is a baby-maker! lol I have suckers popping up DOZENS of feet away from the mother tree. I'm ready to cut it down!


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RE: Need help Identifying this tree...

  • Posted by bboy USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA (My Page) on
    Fri, Aug 8, 14 at 13:40

The suckering is likely to be from black locust seedling root-stock.

'Tortuosa' is more compact and narrow in growth. And older, having been on the market since at least the 1850's - whereas the new one really wasn't around even 20 years ago. Marketed initially as a dwarf shrub, apparently on the basis of specimens restrained by containers it was soon seen to often shoot right up when planted in the ground, to form a vase-shaped tree of normal density, tending to branch low. Whereas 'Tortuosa', as represented around here is often a sort of reduced size version of a mature black locust, with a see through top - a "bonsai tree" that may have been in place many years without breaking out of the 15-35 ft. size range.


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