Return to the Trees Forum | Post a Follow-Up

 o
Help with young crape myrtle

Posted by furbank 10 (My Page) on
Fri, Aug 23, 13 at 15:07

Hello fellow gardeners - Will the branch extending from the base of the tree's left trunk, crossing behind it's right trunk, create problems when it matures? I've heard so many stories about avoid pruning young crapes, yet recommend the removal of crossing branches. Well, this youngster is starting life with a crossing branch, and the removal of it would take out the majority of it's canopy right side. What shall I do? I realize that pruning should be done in late Jan. - Feb. I am very concerned & any suggestions are greatly appreciated. Thank you!


Follow-Up Postings:

 o
RE: Help with young crape myrtle

Crossing branches can be removed when they are seen.

Do it now. Your tree has plenty of other leaves to take over.


 o
RE: Help with young crape myrtle

Thanks for the quick response, however I failed to mention that the tree was planted in March 2013 zone 7 & hasn't established itself yet. Should I wait 2 growing seasons before cutting on it. There are so many conflicting care instructions given online, that I don't know the exact season to prune. Is it in the late Fall or early Spring for zone 7? Online says Jan., but wouldn't it be exposed to frost & be at risk?! Please help. Thank you


 o
RE: Help with young crape myrtle

"...the tree was planted in March 2013 zone 7 & hasn't established itself yet. Should I wait 2 growing seasons before cutting on it."

If you were "limbing-up" for aesthetic reasons, I'd say sure, wait until the second growing seasons to give your crape time to get established. However, in the case of diseased, dead, or rubbing branches, you can go ahead and prune them at your earliest convenience.

"...I don't know the exact season to prune. Is it in the late Fall or early Spring for zone 7?"

The ideal time for pruning crapes is late winter to very early spring. Pruning during this time will ensure that the plant is able to cover over the wounds as quickly as possible. It's also a good time because there are no leaves and you can more easily tell what you are doing. All this doesn't mean you couldn't prune at some other time. I would avoid pruning really late in the growing season, which would encourage new growth that wouldn't have time to harden off before winter.


 o Post a Follow-Up

Please Note: Only registered members are able to post messages to this forum.

    If you are a member, please log in.

    If you aren't yet a member, join now!


Return to the Trees Forum

Information about Posting

  • You must be logged in to post a message. Once you are logged in, a posting window will appear at the bottom of the messages. If you are not a member, please register for an account.
  • Please review our Rules of Play before posting.
  • Posting is a two-step process. Once you have composed your message, you will be taken to the preview page. You will then have a chance to review your post, make changes and upload photos.
  • After posting your message, you may need to refresh the forum page in order to see it.
  • Before posting copyrighted material, please read about Copyright and Fair Use.
  • We have a strict no-advertising policy!
  • If you would like to practice posting or uploading photos, please visit our Test forum.
  • If you need assistance, please Contact Us and we will be happy to help.


Learn more about in-text links on this page here