Return to the Trees Forum | Post a Follow-Up

 o
Growing Cedars from seed

Posted by country_sunshine (My Page) on
Sat, Oct 23, 10 at 15:59

I have a lot of Cedars on our property here in Middle Tennessee... and I would like to plant a line of them so as to block out a new neighbors unsightly junk yard he appears to be building...... I have one particular cedar tree that is nearly blue with little Cedar berries.... Can I just take a bunch of these and scatter them along where I want to make this Cedar Screen? Is there anything special I need to do?

Can anyone help me here?

Thanks bunches,
Carolyn


Follow-Up Postings:

 o
RE: Growing Cedars from seed

Cedars don't have berries, they have cones, around 10 cm long. A conifer with blue 'berries' is likely a juniper. Take the 'berries' and scrape all the flesh off the seeds, then sow the seeds. Typically juniper seeds will take 18 months to germinate - those sown now will sprout in spring 2012.

Resin


 o
RE: Growing Cedars from seed

cedars are conifers..the berries are cones.. there is a conifer forum.. but those peeps hang here.. so post where ever it pleases you ...

the free range blue seedling you have is consider invasive in many areas.. and that notion is indicated by your plant..

that i would encourage you to further plant more invasives... will not happen ...

every county in the US has a soil conservation district office.. your vision block is commonly known as a wind break..

the conservation dist.. will sell cheap stock in spring at the proper planting time .. and it will not be invasive .... something like 25 plants around $16 bucks... give or take ...

go that route.. rather than doing what you are thinking.. PLEASE ...

ken

Here is a link that might be useful: flip to the images side to see if it looks familiar ....


 o
RE: Growing Cedars from seed

Thank you Ken and Resin... (love that name !!) ... I will look into getting some from the conservation district... They advertise in early spring to sign up for certain trees here....

I really didn't know they were invasive.... we have quite a few, but not so they seemed invasive... so I learened something new today. Thank you...

Carolyn


 o
RE: Growing Cedars from seed

I love when native plants are termed invasive... LOL @Ken

Eastern Red Cedar is "invasive" as in that is their niche, colonizing open fields and preparing the way for larger and more desirable trees. Its not like Ailanthus or Silk Tree, which are non-native trees which invade the landscape from cultivated individuals.


 o
RE: Growing Cedars from seed

  • Posted by brandon7 6b (like 7b now) TN (My Page) on
    Sat, Oct 23, 10 at 21:00

As Famartin indicated, the juniper in question is almost certainly Juniperus virginiana (Eastern Red-cedar), and is a very common native in Tennessee. They are by definition NOT invasive. They really aren't even close to what I would call aggressive. If you want more of them, look around and I bet you will find small seedlings that you can easily transplant. I can't think of one single negative to using this plant as part of your landscape, except maybe they are kind of common and they are hosts for some rust disease (cedar-apple rust, for instance). Overall, I think this plant is a really good choice (it's tough as nails, evergreen, not very susceptible to pest or disease, etc).

Here is a link that might be useful: Map showing their NATIVE habitat


 o
RE: Growing Cedars from seed

oh come on guys ....

she already has a bunch of free range.. bird planted rogue seedlings all over the property .. and you pshaw this.. and encourage her to continue a monoculture ...

where has that logic been in all your other posts brandon ...

diversity rules... she already has too many of these ... and she needs to plant other things ...

as to this: Thank you Ken and Resin... (love that name !!) .. my mother thanks you.. unless you werent talking to me.. lol .. otherwise you are welcome ...

add some other things in your yard ... it will diversify your garden.. and your view ... who needs another 50 ERC ... eh??? leave that to the ditches and byways of TN ....

ken


 o
RE: Growing Cedars from seed

Whoa... hold on... please don't get all twitterpated here... I have a lot of ERC's on the property, but by that I mean, we probably have 20 altogether... We have two GINORMOUS ones around which we placed our circle driveway. Then along the drive way coming up to the house there are probably 3 or 4 large trees.. and then along the road there is another really large on... I am having a man come in and clear out a lot of underbrush that has encroached on our "lawn" so as to expose the little cedars that are sprinkled along the tree line and so that we can see the large oaks, maples, sweet gum, hickory, etc.. that we have in our little forest in the back of the house... There are some little cedars growing that are anywhere from 1' tall to 3' tall that I asked for him to leave as they are nicely spaced and staggered naturally rather than having that planted look. Perhaps I will charge up the batteries in my old digital camera so I can take a few photos...and then you can see what I mean. Kinda hard to make a judgement call without seeing what it really looks like. We are on a little over 7 acres and the only "problem" plant we seem to have is what they call "wild hedge"... and that stuff once it gets a toe hold pops up everywhere...
I have tried transplanting baby cedars but every one of them died.. so I did something that our creator didn't agree with...

Anyway, let me take some photos after church today so you can see the "lay of the land" so to speak..

Thanks,
Carolyn


 o
RE: Growing Cedars from seed

We are on a little over 7 acres and the only "problem" plant we seem to have is what they call "wild hedge"... and that stuff once it gets a toe hold pops up everywhere...

That wild hedge is probably chinese privet (Ligustrum sinense). A true invasive.

Consider also planting a few other evergreens like wax myrtle and some cheap pines. Both of these are available from the forestry commission in my state, might be for you too. Once other trees grow up, the pines can be easily removed if you like (soft wood, easy to cut with a saw and they don't sprout back from the stump) - but in the meantime they can be a cheap and easy screening plant.


 o
RE: Growing Cedars from seed

  • Posted by brandon7 6b (like 7b now) TN (My Page) on
    Sun, Oct 24, 10 at 20:02

"I have tried transplanting baby cedars but every one of them died."

They are usually pretty easy to transplant. Maybe you didn't get enough root, you moved them at a bad time of year, or they weren't properly cared for after transplant. Now would be a good time to try again, or you can do it anytime between now and early spring. Be sure to monitor the soil's moisture level carefully and don't let them dry out in between waterings.


 o
RE: Growing Cedars from seed

I've been transplanting several of these every year for some time. Stick to sizes under 12" and get as much root as you can. I pot them in 5 gal. pots. Water every other day for several weeks. Like to leave them in partial sun for first 6 weeks. Get about 75-80% survival. Once they've grown about 6-10" in the pot, their root system will be at the edges of the pot and they're ready for transplanting. They are always very hardy by that time. Never lost one with "5 gallon roots" yet. Very minimal watering is then needed for actual survival, but regular weekly or bi-weekly watering will keep them in good health and allow them to grow faster.


 o
RE: Growing Cedars from seed

Thank you for your tips.... I will go hunting for some little ones to pot up...

Carolyn


 o Post a Follow-Up

Please Note: Only registered members are able to post messages to this forum.

    If you are a member, please log in.

    If you aren't yet a member, join now!


Return to the Trees Forum

Information about Posting

  • You must be logged in to post a message. Once you are logged in, a posting window will appear at the bottom of the messages. If you are not a member, please register for an account.
  • Please review our Rules of Play before posting.
  • Posting is a two-step process. Once you have composed your message, you will be taken to the preview page. You will then have a chance to review your post, make changes and upload photos.
  • After posting your message, you may need to refresh the forum page in order to see it.
  • Before posting copyrighted material, please read about Copyright and Fair Use.
  • We have a strict no-advertising policy!
  • If you would like to practice posting or uploading photos, please visit our Test forum.
  • If you need assistance, please Contact Us and we will be happy to help.


Learn more about in-text links on this page here