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Quercus rubra in the Deep South?

Posted by alabamatreehugger 8a/8b south Alabama (My Page) on
Wed, Nov 2, 11 at 22:40

Just got back from a vacation in NYC and I picked up some Q.rubra acorns while walking in Central Park. Anyone think these would stand a chance of growing down here on the gulf coast?


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Quercus rubra in the Deep South?

Yeah if you stratify them in your fridge for a couple months first. But i doubt they would be able to reproduce once they mature.


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RE: Quercus rubra in the Deep South?

  • Posted by jqpublic 7b/8a Wake County NC (My Page) on
    Thu, Nov 3, 11 at 0:28

I live in 7b and they grow well here. As long as you can get them to germinate I think you'll be ok. We were well above 100degrees here several times this summer.


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RE: Quercus rubra in the Deep South?

I think I picked up about 8 of them (didn't want to walk around with pockets full of acorns, LOL). They all sunk in water immediately, except one that took around 24hrs. I have them in moist sand in the fridge now.


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RE: Quercus rubra in the Deep South?

We have them native in the woods here.
They are native all the way down to almost the FL/AL line, so if you got acorns from those trees they would likely thrive.

The native range of northern red oak:


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RE: Quercus rubra in the Deep South?

Moving any part of a plant, or soil from one area to another without proper Phytosanitary paperwork is dangerous and in most cases illegal. Human movement is the number one cause of the spread of invasive insects and diseases. You should burn these acorns now and order some from a reputable plant dealer.
I am sorry if I sound cross, but most people do not realize the damage they can do.
These are just a few of the devastating problems that were moved into locations they don't belong by unsuspecting people. I have seen first hand and worked on control and reducing the spread of many of the problems below. If you ever see the damage done by any of these pests first hand you will appreciate where I stand on moving plants and soil.
1. Asian Longhorned beetle
2. Sudden Oak Death
3. Lilly leaf beetle
4. Gypsy Moth
5. Hemlock Woolly Adelgid
6. Emerald Ash Borer
7. Zebra Mussels
8. Asian Carp
9. Winter Moth

I am sure you do not want to be the person responsible for moving a new pest or disease to your state.

Here is a link that might be useful: List of invasive species


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RE: Quercus rubra in the Deep South?

"Moving any part of a plant, or soil from one area to another without proper Phytosanitary paperwork is ... in most cases illegal."

That's incorrect. Unless the plant in question is a noxious weed (or state legal equivalent), or, is involved in a plant quarantine, it's not illegal for an individual to move plants or plant parts across state lines.


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RE: Quercus rubra in the Deep South?

IpmMan,
Most of the older posters here know my stance on invasive species. I understand their impact on the environment and have cleared as many of them as possible from my property.

SOD doesn't exist in NY and is only known in CA and OR. And as far as I know Gypsy moths don't spread through acorns.


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RE: Quercus rubra in the Deep South?

Actually it is illegal in many states. Even houseplants need proper certification to be moved into some states.
Are we sure SOD is not in New York? The big fat shiny Asian Longhorned Beetle was in New York and Worcester at least 10 years before anyone found it. Just because something has not been identified in an area does not mean it is not there. Any one who has conducted surveys knows that things are often very hard to find in low populations. Indeed most invasive species are found by homeowners and not the people who are actually looking for it.
Plus no one knows what other insects and diseases that we do not know about yet are in an area and lurking on plant parts, just waiting for an unsuspecting person to give them a ride.
Even soil on tires has moved nematodes hundreds of miles, to areas where they did not exist.
Again do not move plant material out of its local area.
Just look up the map for Thousand Canker disease of Walnut and think about how it could have possibly moved like it has?

Here is a link that might be useful: Thousand Cankers


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RE: Quercus rubra in the Deep South?

  • Posted by jcalhoun 8b Mobile County AL (My Page) on
    Mon, Nov 7, 11 at 15:25

Treehugger;

If you are familiar with Bill Finch, he has a good explanation as to why some trees and shrubs won't thrive here on the coast even though the species may be native to our area. Some species need to originate on the coast in order to thrive.

He is the garden editor of the Mobile Press-Register and can be contacted there.


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RE: Quercus rubra in the Deep South?

Seed provenance is pretty important in cases like this. Some northern species leaf out a month later or more and have a tough time with the heat. You should collect from your native populations.

For foreign species the seed should come from similar places or a little drier for drought tolerance.


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RE: Quercus rubra in the Deep South?

IPM, can you give us some examples of states with universal interstate plant (and especially seed) import/export restrictions for individuals? Hawaii is the only state I can think of that even comes close, and is in a unique situation. Other states would have one heck of a time even beginning to enforce such a ban, and I've never heard of even one example of this type of law in the continental United States existing or being enforced. I'm intrigued (as well as being HIGHLY skeptical of it being the norm).


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RE: Quercus rubra in the Deep South?

JCalhoun, I haven't heard anything out of Bill Finch in years. I remember when he had a show on TV. I have started many trees from native seed collected at Blakeley State Park, there are some beautiful Beech and Bigleaf Magnolia trees there. There's also an American Elm there near the landing that I wish I could get seed from.

IpmMan, There are LOTS of acorns and saplings for sale on ebay (not to mention the seed exchange here at GW), my dozen acorns aren't even a drop in the bucket compared to what gets shipped around out there.


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RE: Quercus rubra in the Deep South?

  • Posted by jqpublic 7b/8a Wake County NC (My Page) on
    Mon, Mar 26, 12 at 4:19

Hi, did yours sprout? I decided to do the same, although I used a local batch of acorns. Two sprouted and one was attacked by an animal of some sort. I sowed them in a 8" deep pot with about the same amount of width.

The taproot is already coming out of the bottom and I'm not quite sure what to do. I'm thinking I should just let it grow and transplant it in the fall. I really enjoy the lime green color of it's new growth!


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RE: Quercus rubra in the Deep South?

jqpublic,
IMHO, periodically trim off the tap root if it growing out the bottom. This will force side branching, and make planting easier.

Arktrees


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RE: Quercus rubra in the Deep South?

  • Posted by jqpublic 7b/8a Wake County NC (My Page) on
    Mon, Mar 26, 12 at 21:36

Thank you...I'm on it!


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