Return to the Trees Forum | Post a Follow-Up

 o
Baby giant sequoia in winter

Posted by boredsuburban Long Island (My Page) on
Thu, Dec 19, 13 at 11:11

Hi,

I have a baby giant sequoia that I haven't watered in months. I had another one that died of root rot. I was told by someone that I should not water them in the winter because it's too cold, but I'm keeping the plants indoors. It's not hot inside but it's not cold either - about 60F but i'm not sure since it's next to a window and a heater as well. I checked the plant and it seems to be doing fine, with only a few needles on the bottom turning brown, but I don't know if the plant can survive the whole winter and spring without water. A few branches seem to be slightly browning. I attached a picture. It's not old at all, less than a year. What should I do? Leave it alone? Water it lightly? Put it in a warm spot with light and water it? Thanks for the help.


Follow-Up Postings:

 o
RE: Baby giant sequoia in winter

all those words.. and you didnt tell us the result of inserting your finger.. and whether the media has any ambient moisture in it ..

why are you limited to the bipolar dichotomy of drowning it.. or trying to grow it in a desert???

forced air heat...or not ... whats the humidity in the house???

i appears happy where it is.. though growing horizontally for some reason .. lol .. why in the world would you move it for watering purpose???? you are concerned about the variable called 'water' .. so you are thinking.. hmmm.. i will change location.. light.. and temp as well... that is called loving it to death ... dont do that.. lets stick with water ... for now ...

give it two tablespoons of water ... and walk away .. why.. i dont know.. mostly because i dont think their native habitat is arid .... it definitely needs some moisture.. and not as much as you gave to the one that root rotted ... find a happy middle ...

most of us tree peeps.. will say.. trees dont grow in the house... long term ... you might want to get some diverse opinion.. in the houseplant forum .... or try the GW search engine ...

good luck ...

ken


 o
RE: Baby giant sequoia in winter

60 is far too warm for a Sequoia in winter. Ideally, Sequoia seedlings are buried under several feet of snow for most of the winter, which is exactly what happens in their native habitat. Barring that, an unheated garage could suffice. Though, it will require acclimatization given its been 60 so far.

It seems to me that Sequoias around here are better planted outdoors when they have some size, enough to get them to some really strong growth within a few years at most. Otherwise bacterial infections like Cercospora and Kabatina can wipe them out during your typically humid summers.


 o
RE: Baby giant sequoia in winter

hi boredsuburban,
My suggestion would be to water your seedling until water comes out the drain hole. You shouldn't have to water it again for a few weeks. Definitely keep it away from the heater and keep an eye on it for mites.
How far are you from Morris Plains NJ? There is a beauty there at the Frelinghuysen Arboretum linked below.
This pic is of a 15' Giant Sequoia at Baltimore's Cylburn Arboretum. I'm not sure about the brown branches, but otherwise it looks fine.
 photo 09-28-13001.jpg

Here is a link that might be useful: Frelinghuysen Arboretum


 o
RE: Baby giant sequoia in winter

Yes, I don't know why this is being treated as some tender tropical. It is not...regardless of the actual species (which has not been identified). You are overheating it, and under watering it in my opinion. This is not some dainty, hothouse, tropical houseplant ...needs to be outdoors...in the ground. The only Sequoia that is marginal in NJ is the Coast Red...and even this one is being grown in certain areas (but not in houses).


 o
RE: Baby giant sequoia in winter

The words "Giant Sequoia" in the OP, and the image shown, both suggest this is Sequoiadendron giganteum.


 o
RE: Baby giant sequoia in winter

The bigger issue with either of the two California redwood/sequoias - the summer humidity + heat combo does a number on them.

Sam_md, I'll have to stop at Cylburn sometime - I'm impressed that Sequoia looks that (relatively) good down here. I've never seen a healthy one in the East to speak of any bigger than a few feet. I've seen larger ones, but they always have a lot of dead spots in them.


 o
RE: Baby giant sequoia in winter

FWIW I don't think your little baby tree would have any issue surviving outdoors in a Long Island winter. Being in a pot might throw it off a bit, but mounding some leaves or mulch around it would probably be enough if your coldest weather is not accompanied by snowcover (which on Long Island can be hit or miss like it is here in MD).


 o
RE: Baby giant sequoia in winter

I haven't heard of any problems with heat and humidity with regard to Coast Redwood (Sequoia sempervirens). It seems to do perfectly fine across the southeastern US.

Giant Sequoia (Sequoiadendron giganteum) is a whole other story...


 o
RE: Baby giant sequoia in winter

I saw a Sequoiadendron gigantea at the National Arboretum in Washington DC in the Gotelli Collection. If I remember right, it was over 40 ft in the year 2000 and looked pretty good.
MIke


 o
RE: Baby giant sequoia in winter

I have 6 baby giant sequoia, water them every day as long as you have well drained soil. They love water, they just don't like soil that's not well drained. If the rootball ever dries out, they will die.

If they are outside, they still need water, just not as much.


 o
RE: Baby giant sequoia in winter

boredsuburban,

I have grown Giant Sequoia (Sequoiadendron Giganteum) from seedlings smaller than yours, I have attached photos.

These trees love water, in the wild the big trees transpire over 500 gallons of water a day, but they take in thousands of gallons per day. It's true that the small ones get snow cover which protects them from browning, but after 3-4 years, they will stay green without snow cover. If you have cold winters, your Giant Sequoia will be fine, they grow in areas that do get below zero from time to time. However, if they are potted do not let the rootball freeze, that may kill them. Hot moist summers will not kill them, fallacy. These trees are among the most hardy of all trees on the planet, they live for thousands of years, they see lots of different weather. The one thing they have all year round is water, the water comes from mountains and seeps up from crevices and keeps the trees well watered no matter how hot or dry it is. The biggest problem with these trees in areas out of their normal habitat is lack of water. I water my potted trees 2-3 times a day in 90-100 degree humid heat, and every day otherwise. The biggest thing is they need excellent drainage, not lack of water. These do not grow like other evergreens, do not even compare.

These trees will lose some of the bright green in winter, and turn darker, not to worry that is normal. Once you plant the tree in the ground, they will grow past nearly any pest or fungus you can throw at them.

Photobucket Pictures, Images and Photos

Photobucket Pictures, Images and Photos


 o
RE: Baby giant sequoia in winter

see link

Here is a link that might be useful: Sequoia diseases


 o
RE: Baby giant sequoia in winter

  • Posted by bboy USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA (My Page) on
    Fri, Dec 27, 13 at 14:11

California has a Mediterranean precipitation regime, summers are dry. You wouldn't have to water your trees so much if they were not in clay pots. And the pot the larger one in the ground is in is too small.

We have the same climate as California up here except winters are colder than in lowland California, and we do not have the numerous hot days of southern California. Sierra redwoods growing in the ground do not have to be watered up here. In the metropolitan areas (Portland, Seattle) July precipitation is typically less than 1".


 o
RE: Baby giant sequoia in winter

I took this pic yesterday. It is the original 'Hazel Smith' sequoia which is a popular blue form. The location is the former Watnong Nursery nr Parsippany NJ.
I don't think that the brown is normal and that bothers me.
Could this be Cercospora sequoiae, a fungus which attacks foliage of conifers? If so, how does one treat a tree of this size?
 photo 07-09-14004.jpg
 photo 07-09-14006.jpg


 o
RE: Baby giant sequoia in winter

I don't think one does treat a tree that size; basically, just hope it has the vitality to power through it. Usually I don't think it kills large trees, just babies.


 o Post a Follow-Up

Please Note: Only registered members are able to post messages to this forum.

    If you are a member, please log in.

    If you aren't yet a member, join now!


Return to the Trees Forum

Information about Posting

  • You must be logged in to post a message. Once you are logged in, a posting window will appear at the bottom of the messages. If you are not a member, please register for an account.
  • Please review our Rules of Play before posting.
  • Posting is a two-step process. Once you have composed your message, you will be taken to the preview page. You will then have a chance to review your post, make changes and upload photos.
  • After posting your message, you may need to refresh the forum page in order to see it.
  • Before posting copyrighted material, please read about Copyright and Fair Use.
  • We have a strict no-advertising policy!
  • If you would like to practice posting or uploading photos, please visit our Test forum.
  • If you need assistance, please Contact Us and we will be happy to help.


Learn more about in-text links on this page here